We all know by now the brouhaha created by Meryl Streep’s speech at the Golden Globes in which she bravely attacked Donald Trump in front of her like-minded peers. Then, shock of shocks, Donald Trump declared Meryl Streep overrated and irrelevant. The media, rather than letting it go, have become obsessed with debunking President-elect Trump’s declaration. Equally unable to let it go were the host and co-hosts of The Glenn Beck Program, who made it their mission to debunk the debunking of Meryl Streep’s mediocrity.

Listen to this segment from The Glenn Beck Program:


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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors:

GLENN: So I get in early today, and, Jeffy, you would know this because you do the Pat & Stu show. They haven’t let go of the Meryl Streep thing.

JEFFY: It’s tough to let go of. When you say they, I’m in there with them. It’s still tough to let go of.

GLENN: It’s tough to let go of.

JEFFY: She is agonizing.

GLENN: Here, this is what kills me is the fact that the media actually tried to do a — a — what do they call it? A debunking of that. And they went to see if indeed Meryl Streep was irrelevant and overrated.

JEFFY: I mean, it’s —

GLENN: First of all, that’s an opinion. That’s not — I mean, this is the thing they decide to spend their time on. Really?

PAT: Pretty weird.

GLENN: It’s just so bizarre.

PAT: And, of course, she is overrated.

JEFFY: And irrelevant. I don’t know about irrelevant.

GLENN: Make the case.

PAT: Unless you have a standard set of criteria.

GLENN: Because I look at her — with the exception of that Abba nightmare that just won’t leave me alone.

PAT: Mamma Mia! is a good example.

GLENN: Oh, oh.

JEFFY: Yeah.

PAT: And that’s one of the ones they feature prominently in that big —

JEFFY: Yeah. The only reason I know that show is because my parents loved that show.

GLENN: Oh, I hated that show. I hated every second of that show.

JEFFY: I know.

GLENN: I would have eaten off my arms, if I could — if it would have meant I could be free from that —

PAT: And if you didn’t like a musical, there must have been something wrong with you.

JEFFY: Right.

STU: Mamma Mia! was one of the most traumatic experiences of my life, seeing that you made me go see it.

JEFFY: That’s right.

GLENN: Oh, yeah, I did. As a punishment.

STU: As a punishment for something. I don’t remember what it was.

PAT: Let’s talk Ricki and the Flash.

JEFFY: Another singing one.

STU: I think we can all agree Mamma Mia! was one of the worst things that’s ever been created. It’s also her highest grossing picture. In case you’re worried —

GLENN: But that’s not her.

STU: Yeah, I know it’s not her. Success, it’s not her. And that’s kind of the point I’m trying to make. Her entire career is filled with —

GLENN: Sophie’s Choice, not good?

STU: ’81 to ’85, she has two movies in there: Cramer versus Cramer.

PAT: No, that was ’79. But ’79 to ’85 was probably the highlight of her career. Cramer versus Cramer.

PAT: Right.

GLENN: Excellent.

PAT: Sophie’s Choice.

GLENN: Excellent.

PAT: And Out of Africa. Is that the other —

STU: You’re going to give her out of Africa?

GLENN: I’ll give her Out of Africa. What about Silkwood?

STU: Yeah, Silkwood.

PAT: Filmed in this studio on this stage, and that’s what it is —

STU: However, I mean, okay. Let’s just give her that for the fun of it. That gets you to 1985. So she’s got a few movies pre-1985 that you could say are good. Then you have a good decade of nothing, unless you want to throw She-Devil in the mix for a good third.

GLENN: Oh, horrible.

PAT: Are you forgetting Iron Weed?

STU: Thank you very much. So a bunch of nothing until — now, yes, she appeared — for example, she was a supporting actress in Defending Your Life. Defending Your Life —

PAT: That’s an Albert Brooks —

STU: That’s an Albert Brooks movie though. It’s not a a Meryl Streep movie.

GLENN: No, but she was good in it.

STU: She was okay in it.

JEFFY: She was okay.

GLENN: She wasn’t bad. She was good in it.

STU: Is it a career-defining role? The answer to that is no. The next one of those you get —

PAT: You might say a lot of people liked that.

STU: The next one you get really is Bridges of Madison County.

GLENN: Oh, was agonizing.

PAT: Which was horrific.

STU: Horrible. Horrible.

GLENN: Wait a minute.

STU: Now, ten years —

GLENN: Wait a minute. Wait a minute. Wait a minute. Let’s have the discussion —

STU: Terrible.

GLENN: — is it horrible — wait a minute, is it horrible or is it horrible because we saw her and Clint Eastwood with his and her shirts off.

PAT: Yes. That was a big part of it.

GLENN: I was scarred.

STU: That was part of the movie, but it’s still a bad movie.

GLENN: I don’t have any recollection other than that.

STU: Let’s get — Pat, give the recollection quickly of what happened in the movie, Bridges of Madison County.

GLENN: I know this one.

PAT: Let’s see, a hard-working loving considerate husband and father, protector of his wife and children, as kind of a favor — a good thing for his children and a favor for his wife, takes the two kids to the state fair for a week.

STU: That’s nice.

PAT: And while he is doing that loving act of kindness for his wife, she is inviting some stranger — some drifter who showed up at the door in to do her for the week. I mean, it is a horrific premise.

GLENN: Wow.

STU: What a wonderful —

PAT: I mean, that’s the thanks he gets for being a good man. Hideous movie. I hate that book. I hate that movie.

GLENN: I remember reading the book and liking it. I don’t remember it framed that way.

PAT: I don’t think the book framed itself that way, but that’s what it is.

GLENN: Right.

STU: So that’s the breakup. From ’83 to ’95, we find the good piece of work, which is Bridges of Madison County, which as Pat I think just described was not as good as maybe some others say. Then you’re taking some more time off from her wonderful success as a magical actress, and you clear — I mean, you could go to adaptation, which I didn’t particularly like, but it was a critical darling —

PAT: I didn’t see it, to know what that is.

STU: Then you’re going all the way, I would say, to probably Devil Wears Prada.

PAT: Which is a good movie.

STU: Now, Devil Wears Prada is a career-defining movie. I think you could put it that way. However, is it really, be honest, a role that any other somewhat similarly aged actress could do?

PAT: Glenn Close could do it easily.

STU: Oh, absolutely. Sigourney Weaver. Absolutely. There’s a dozen people that you could think of at the top of your head.

PAT: Julia Roberts would have had no problem.

GLENN: Yes, yes, yes.

STU: You had to be old and mean. And that was essentially it. And it’s not that big of a deal.

GLENN: Betty White could have done it.

STU: Absolutely. She would have been fantastic in that role. But because it was Meryl Streep, it was some amazing thing that she did. In reality, it was just another movie.

And she, again, wasn’t the star of the movie. She was the secondary character.

GLENN: So where did she develop this —

STU: Right.

GLENN: Where did she develop —

JEFFY: Yes. This is the question.

GLENN: I was actually not on your side, until you started presenting the case.

STU: Because there’s a lot of stuff in here.

PAT: Julie versus Julia.

STU: Okay. Julie versus Julia is a pretty good movie.

PAT: Where she did a pretty serviceable imitation of Julia Childs. But so did Dan Aykroyd. He could have played that part.

JEFFY: Thank you. Thank you.

GLENN: No, that’s not true. That’s not true.

STU: No, he’s right. Aykroyd was better.

No. She did a good impression of that.

But, for example, Jim Carrey did a much better impression of Andy Kaufman. No one is throwing him into the freaking Hall of Fame for it.

PAT: Oh, yeah. That was genius.

GLENN: That was genius.

PAT: Yeah, that was genius.

STU: He was genius in that role. And everybody was like, oh, well, it was just an impression. That’s what she did.

And, by the way, she wasn’t even the main character in the movie. She was in the movie for like ten minutes.

Okay. So where are we here? Then we’re Mamma Mia! Okay? Which we’ve all discussed as a disaster.

PAT: But you’re right. 144 million. That’s her biggest box office.

STU: Biggest box office of all time. Inflation adjusted is a problem, but still.

PAT: Of all time.

GLENN: Literally, that could have been done by muppets. It’s the music that carried that.

PAT: Right. Right.

GLENN: That’s all that was, was a music video.

STU: Again, if you put a different person who was a better singer in that role, it would have been better. It wasn’t that she nailed the part above and beyond anybody else.

GLENN: But, again, I think the muppets would have been better.

STU: Exactly.

PAT: Then you get some roles where she was actually terrible in.

And Into the Woods is one of them.

JEFFY: Oh, my gosh.

PAT: Into the Woods, she was absolutely bad in that movie.

STU: It was a fairytale. Right?

PAT: Yeah. It was a Disney — she was terrible.

GLENN: Oh, yeah, yeah. Horrible. Horrible. Horrible.

JEFFY: Terrible.

PAT: Surprisingly bad. Because I was under the impression, still, buying into the three Oscars and eight Golden Globes, she’s a great actress. And I’m thinking, “She is terrible in this. What happened?”

GLENN: Right.

STU: And then Ricki and the Flash is the ultimate exclamation point in this conversation. She plays the aging rock star. A complete disaster. And, yeah, yeah, she has three Oscars. She’s had 19 nominations. How about winning occasionally? How about that?