Ever had a bowl of hot, spicy chili and forgotten key details about your children’s lives? No? Neither has Glenn, Pat, Stu or Jeffy — but Alex Jones has.


Enjoy the complimentary clip or read the transcript for details.

GLENN: Did he testify yesterday?

STU: He did not.

PAT: He did not.

STU: It was supposed to happen today. It was reported yesterday he was going to testify —

GLENN: We’ve got to get a list — we’ve got to get a listener to go down there and just go — if you’re in Austin, call us now. If you have the day open. You’ve got to get down to this trial and watch this — report on it. I’d love to have somebody take notes and report on this tomorrow.

PAT: Seriously. I mean, yesterday it came out that he was apparently asked about big events for his kids or something or what grades they’re in. And he couldn’t remember what grade his kids were in.

GLENN: Well, but if they’re homeschooled, that’s kind of hard.

STU: Are they homeschooled?

PAT: I don’t know if they’re homeschooled.

STU: Do we have evidence of that?

PAT: His reason was that he had a big bowl of chili for lunch. I’m not familiar with the association between memory and chili.

STU: It’s a very spicy amnesia.

JEFFY: Yeah, you’ve never had hot chili.

PAT: And just forgotten my children? No, I don’t think so.
(laughter)

PAT: I don’t think so.

GLENN: It also came out yesterday in court that he takes his clothes off —

STU: Oh, yeah.

GLENN: — a lot. Like he’s done it with friends, family, and meetings and stuff.

STU: His wife said they were in a group therapy session. And that he just took all of his clothes off. And it’s very common for him to just take his clothes off for no reason in the middle of these things.

PAT: So that’s not a performance art thing. That’s real life.

GLENN: I don’t think he’s performance art.

PAT: I don’t think he is.

GLENN: I think he absolutely believes it.

PAT: He does. I think he does.

JEFFY: Wherever you’re at, you’re trying to sell your supplements, you want to take your clothes off.

STU: The only person saying it’s performance art is Alex Jones’ attorney, who is saying it’s not real. Because he wants custody of his children. I mean, Alex I think — I don’t — he’s even trying to say, well, I don’t mean that. I mean, I still believe everything I say.

JEFFY: Right. Because he knows the implications of it all, man. He’s done.

GLENN: No, he’s not. His people won’t care. They —

STU: It’s almost impossible —

GLENN: How do you discredit a guy who says the government is turning frogs gay and dumping Prozac into the ocean and the shrimp are committing seagull suicide? Come on. How do you discredit —

STU: It’s called shrimpicide. Whatever though. Just make up a term. Take serious information — you’ve got shrimp, who are walking up to seagulls.

PAT: Who are swimming. I don’t think he said they were walking.

STU: I don’t know. Do you have the clip?

GLENN: I have to tell you, there’s misinformation from Stu Burguiere right there.

STU: Why? Why? Because Pat — you’re taking Pat’s word for it?

PAT: Well, here’s — this is long, but…

ALEX: And in major prestigious reports, government studies find that shrimp are just swimming right up to birds. They’re overconfident.

STU: There it is. Keep it going. Keep it going.

ALEX: They’ve had their governors removed.

PAT: Oh, boy. Wow.

ALEX: They’ve had their compulsions removed.

PAT: If you’ve ever had your governor removed, you know how painful that can be. It’s not pleasant.

STU: Or your compulsion.

PAT: Right.

ALEX: And their fear level — this is what the studies, when they approved Prozac in ’81 had shown. That’s why it’s now on the drug insert. That, oh, yeah, most of the time you’re going to be having a great time. It’s a hallucinogen. It’s in a psychotropic category.

PAT: Yeah.

GLENN: Can I tell you something? If you’ve taken Prozac — because I took Prozac. Total hallucinations all the time. All the time.

STU: Oh, really?

GLENN: I remember there was a time I was on Prozac, and I was watching the internet and I saw this big, fat guy who was — who was talking about how the World Trade Center, that bombing was an inside job.

JEFFY: Huh.

GLENN: And —

PAT: No, that was real, Glenn.

GLENN: It was? No, it had to be a hallucination.

PAT: You weren’t hallucinating. That was real.

GLENN: Really?

ALEX: Some days, when you get angry or you don’t take the right amount of the medication or you try to go off of it or you mix it with other things —

PAT: Some days.

STU: Some days.

GLENN: Like LSD.

PAT: Yeah, yeah, yeah.

ALEX: You will break and go in and kill 20 people at a school and then chop your babies’ arms off. Or you’ll put your kids all in their car seats, chain them in, and drive them off a cliff. In every case — in every case, they’ve always been on it.

STU: Does he have a car seat with chains? Is that — is that a normal — I mean, I have a couple car seats myself.

GLENN: No, he wants to make sure that in case the babies start to get loose out of their car seat, they’re still chained in.

STU: Got it.

JEFFY: Yeah.

GLENN: So it’s car seats and chaining.

STU: Car seats and chaining. Got it. Okay.

PAT: You can’t tell me this guy is about —

JEFFY: Did that ever happen? Where someone chained their kids in? I mean, the Susan Smith story, where she pushed them into the lake, she didn’t chain them?

GLENN: This is the part of this — the shrimp are committing suicide because they’re on Prozac, and this is the part that you’re finding a flaw with?

JEFFY: I’m just saying, I’m just trying to find the facts. Just trying to find the facts.

GLENN: All right. Okay.

STU: But this is what people do. I mean, Jeffy is a good example of that. It’s how people think. They will take 100 statements in a row they know are false. Look for one that has the slightest bit of truth and investigate it. It’s so bizarre.

JEFFY: Yeah.