On his radio program Thursday, Glenn shared stunning details of a private encounter he had with Former Fox CEO Roger Ailes while working for the network. Ailes died Thursday morning at the age of 77.

Glenn recounted the closed-door meeting with Ailes in his office.

“I’m walking out after this meeting with him,” Glenn said. “I start walking toward the door, and I see this picture — this black and white photo of a young Roger Ailes, maybe 29, in the Oval Office.”

RELATED: He Was a Brilliant Man: Glenn Remembers Roger Ailes

When Glenn asked him what the picture was, Ailes replied, “Oh, that’s the first split screen.”


Glenn had the shock of his life when he realized Ailes had actually worked on the split screen featuring Richard Nixon making a phone call to the moon.

“This is the kind of stuff that was just kind of like hanging around him, the kind of life that you’re not going to find on Wikipedia,” Glenn said. “If you go to Wikipedia today, all you’re going to see is the bad stuff.”

If you look closely in the video below, you can see the split screen line moving back and forth:

H/T: Stu Burguiere

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

GLENN: And the door to his library was a solid wood door, and he went in — and we were going to have a talk, and he closed the door. And as I’m walking out after this meeting with him — I don’t even remember what it was. We were just talking.

And I — and I get up, and he’s taking a phone call or something. And I get up, and I start walking towards the door. And I see this picture, this black and white photo of a young Roger Ailes, maybe 29, in the Oval Office. And he is — there’s a camera beside him. And he is pointing down to the left.

And he hangs up the phone, or whatever. And I said — now, this is behind a door. The door is usually open.

And I said, “Roger, what is this picture?” And he said, “Oh, that’s — that was the first split screen.”

And I said, “What?” And he said, “Somebody had to come up with the split screen. You know, we didn’t always have split screen.” And I’m like, “Don’t talk down to me.” And I said, “What was it?”

And he said, “We were in the Oval Office. It was Dick Nixon. And I said, ‘We should come up with a way to where Dick can talk to Neil Armstrong, but we should split the screen, so when Neil is on the moon. He’s in one box and the president is in the other box.'”

This is revolutionary thinking at the time. And he said, “But when we put it together, you know, Neil is on the moon. We don’t know which way he’s going to be facing or turning or anything else. And I don’t know which side of the screen the box of the about the is going to be on.” He said, “So we set up three TVs, one that I could see and two — one on one side of the Resolute Desk and one on the other side of the Resolute Desk.”

And I said to the president, “Look at me. As soon as you go on and you say, ‘Neil,’ they’re going to go to this new split screen, when — when I see which side of the television you’re on, I’m going to point to one of the televisions. You look at that television because it will look like you’re looking at Neil in the picture.”

So he said, “That’s the moment where I’m looking at the television, seeing Neil Armstrong on the moon. And I point to the president, ‘That one.'”

This is the kind of stuff that was just kind of like hanging around him, the kind of life that you’re not going to find on Wikipedia. You’re not going to find — and if you go to Wikipedia today, all you’re going to see is the bad stuff.