Legacy of Death: Obamacare Shows the Unintended Consequences of Big Government

Since the passage of Obamacare, thousands of people have died. In February of this year, National Review reported the following:

Public-health data from the Centers for Disease Control confirm what one might expect from a health-care reform that expanded Medicaid coverage for adults: no improvement. In fact, things have gotten worse. Age-adjusted death rates in the U.S. have consistently declined for decades, but in 2015 — unlike in 19 of the previous 20 years — they increased. For the first time since 1993, life expectancy fell. Had mortality continued to decline during ACA implementation in 2014 and 2015 at the same rate as during the 2000–13 period, 80,000 fewer Americans would have died in 2015 alone.

One factor may be overdoses related to opioid consumption. Research shows that opioid use is on the rise in areas where formerly uninsured people now have insurance. As overdose deaths spiked, the theory is that healthy people previously uninsured gained access to opioids through the Affordable Care Act, and became addicted.

“It’s worse in places where you’ve increased and given away free insurance, whenever people can get the free drugs and they can start addictions or worsen them or free up money to buy worse things like heroin,” Co-host Stu Burguiere said.

While Obamacare didn’t directly kill people, the unintended consequences of big government are, and always have been, severe.

“I’m not going to do what the left does. I just want to point out that when it comes to Medicaid . . . expansion, grandma is not going to lose her Medicaid. Who is going to lose — and have to go on the government dole in another way — are the only ones that were expanded. And those were for adults that aren’t in a special [category]. They’re not the elderly, and they’re not the women and children. That’s who was supposed to be covered by all of this,” Glenn said.

Enjoy the complimentary clip or read the transcript for details.