Earlier this month, Russian President Vladimir Putin warned that the leader when it comes to artificial intelligence will also “become the ruler of the world.”

Putin predicted that wars would eventually be fought by AI proxy, saying, “when one party’s drones are destroyed by drones of another, it will have no other choice but to surrender,” according to the Associated Press.

Glenn talked about the future of AI and why America needs to stay ahead in robot research on radio Tuesday. He compared Putin’s word of warning to President John F. Kennedy’s famous speech about why the U.S. sent a man to the moon.


“We choose to go to the moon,” Kennedy said on Sept. 12, 1962. “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard …”

In 2017, countries including the U.S., Russia and China are racing ahead in a different sphere: AI that will completely disrupt how our world works.

“The race now is on,” Glenn said. “This is what the world is racing to create: super intelligence that learns on its own, thinks in a completely alien way and has no human morality.”

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

NASA via Getty Images

VOICE: We choose to go to the moon in this decay and do the other things, not because they’re easy, but because they are hard.

GLENN: That was 55 years ago today. I don’t know what it is with the date of 9/12, but we decided to go to the moon on 9/12. That speech happened in Houston.

Kennedy gave his famous, we choose to go to the moon, 12 years after Sputnik. We went from getting laughed at to landing men on the moon. October 4th, 1957, Soviet Union successfully launched what was called Sputnik into orbit. It was the first satellite.

Soviets were kicking our butt. Two months later, we tried to keep pace by launching the Vanguard TV3. It exploded on the launchpad. We were the laughingstock. But it was the Sputnik moment that changed everything. We realized that we had to roll up our sleeves and get to work.

And thus began the modern day space race. The races were already afoot. But space alone was — was not really the objective, at least not with the Soviets.

Now, the space race is over. But there is a new objective. And this time, the space race — the new space race is on AI. And I think the Sputnik moment has already occurred. The race is on now to be the first to build intelligent machines. The nation that develops AI, quote, will be the ruler of the world. And that’s what Vladimir Putin said to a group of students last week in Russia.

This was his version of “we choose to go to the moon.” Styles are a little bit different. Kennedy was at his inspirational best. Putin was classic Putin. Quote: When one party’s drones are destroyed by drones of another, we will have no choice, but to surrender.

The race now is on, but not towards the heavens. What is it we’re creating now?

Last year, the microchip maker Nvidia began testing their version of self-driving cars, but this car was different than the ones being tested by Google and Apple and Tesla. This car was not programmed by a computer. This car programmed itself. It learned to drive by watching a human drive, and then it wrote its own program.

It’s the latest development that AI has and has all of its supporters excited. And all of its naysayers scared. It’s called Deep Learning. And the problem is, is some of these systems are becoming so complex that the human creators don’t even understand them anymore. Machines that are writing their own code and learning how to make decisions without being prompted to do so. Their style of reason and thought is completely alien to the researchers trying to figure it out. Trying to figure out what we created.

This is what the world is racing to create. Super intelligence that learns on its own, thinks in a completely alien way, and has no human morality.

With the way we’re going with human morality right now, maybe that’s a good thing. But the question is: The AI race is on. And Putin has just given his “go to the moon” speech. But 55 years from now, will history remember us as the winners or the losers of the AI race, no matter which side wins?