Can you name the three branches of government?

If you’re able to list executive, legislative and judicial as the three branches of the U.S. government, you are one of just 26 percent of Americans who can, according to a new poll from the Annenberg Public Policy Center.

This survey’s results show us that America is having an identity crisis, Glenn asserted on radio Wednesday.


“We don’t even know who we are,” he said.

We have all the information in the world available for us through technology. How is it possible that Americans are so ignorant about our own government when we have so many tools available and everyone is required to go to school?

“The generation with the most information is the least informed,” Glenn said, urging Americans to reach out to one another as we relearn the basics.

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

This is a rush transcript and may contain errors.

GLENN: America has a really serious problem. And here it is: We don’t even know who we are.

Even worse, we don’t even care. We don’t even care that we don’t know.

Only 26 percent of Americans can name all three branches of our government. Twenty-six percent.

Now, this is a little depressing, but it has been brought to us by the annual constitutional day civics survey. According to the survey, more than one-third of Americans cannot name any of our First Amendment rights. Any. Not one. There’s five, by the way. They can’t name one.

Now, how is that even possible? In a nation where you have to go to school by law.

We have less of an excuse than any previous generation of Americans for knowing — for not knowing the basic mechanics of our government. I mean, there was a time when you couldn’t find this stuff. There was a time when, you know, you couldn’t afford a book. You couldn’t get to school. School wasn’t — whatever the excuse was. But we have more tools and resources at the touch of a button than our ancestors could have ever dreamt of. And yet they would be sad to know how little we know. It is pathetic. Pathetic that the generation with the most information is the least informed.

Any population that doesn’t know the basic functions of its own government, doesn’t know its fundamental rights, is asking — is begging to be taken advantage of.

Our Constitution is the longest-running Constitution in the world. Two hundred and twenty-nine years and counting. But that doesn’t make us invincible. This is an experiment. And it requires participation. It requires our attention. It requires care from us Americans.

But we’re not willing to give it, it seems. Although I think America needs a scolding, this isn’t a scolding. This is a plea.

Let’s help each other learn the basics. Let’s stop fighting about stupid statues and, please, let’s fix this before it’s too late for our children.

The story goes that Benjamin Franklin walked out of the constitutional convention at the very end, and a woman came up and said, “Mr. Franklin, what sort of government have you given us?”

He said, “A republic — if you can keep it.”