Yes, people are still talking about the NFL. On Tuesday, 11 NFL team owners and representatives standing in for players met to try to untangle the controversy over protests on the field. While they didn’t reach a specific deal in the huddle, both sides called the meeting “productive.”

On today’s show, Pat and Jeffy opened up the phone lines while sitting in for Glenn to invite discussion about the topic of kneeling in protest, which continues to be controversial.

Caller Robert from Alabama clarified that people have a right to protest in this country as long as they are not being violent or breaking the law.


NFL team owners now have to figure out how to mitigate damage to their business if players keep protesting and it alienates fans.

“They also have the responsibility to suffer the consequences, whatever they may be,” Pat added. “As ratings go down and they continue to anger more and more fans, it’s going to affect the bottom line.”

Jeffy pointed out that it’s an issue of perception as well. Some people will always see the protest as a form of disrespect for the flag and the national anthem, regardless of what the players intend to say by kneeling.

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

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PAT: Where there are bad cops, it seems they are coming to justice. When cops are exonerated, in some cases, there are good reasons for it. A jury heard out the evidence, weighed the evidence, and found in favor of the cop. I don’t know what you can do about that. 888-727-BECK.

Robert in Alabama, hi, you’re on the Glenn Beck Program.

CALLER: Hey, good morning. Thank you so he so on very much for allowing me to respond.

PAT: Uh-huh.

CALLER: Just listening to you two gentlemen. I just wanted to comment on some concerns that I have.

PAT: Uh-huh.

CALLER: I recall in the Pledge of Allegiance something that specifically said one nation under God. Indivisible with liberty and justice for all. Hence the words, in justice for all. In reference to the national anthem people protesting.

I support it 100 percent. I believe as long as it is a peaceful protest, I’m all for.

PAT: Uh-huh.

CALLER: The concern I have is when my commander-in-chief refer to those gentlemen as SOBs. I think that was very distasteful. I think it was out of order. And sometimes, I think our president has a tendency to antagonize the situation.

But when you’re more objective about it, Roger Goodell, the NFL, he knows that if he doesn’t get a hold of this whole situation, it’s going to be a loss of revenue, not only for the players, but for the owners.

PAT: That’s right. Uh-huh.

CALLER: Yeah, so I really feel that we just need to calm down and let the guys protest, as long as it’s decent and in order. I don’t think it’s hurting anything. I was at the Detroit Lions Saints games. And I sat next to some military people. I was on vacation and had a good conversation with them. The Saints, they kneel prior to the national anthem, and they stood along with the Detroit Lions.

PAT: Yeah, I don’t have any problem with that.

CALLER: This was just awesome.

PAT: Yeah.

CALLER: But in reference to the past two guests, a sign of disrespect. It’s not a sign of disrespect, they have the right to protest, as long as it’s in order. And I thank you for allowing me to respond.

PAT: Sure, thanks, Robert.

Sure, they have the right. But then they also have the responsibility to suffer the consequences, whatever they may be. So if the owner says, stop doing it because we’re losing revenue — and you just put your finger on exactly, Robert, what the problem is. There is a problem with it because they’re losing revenue.

As ratings go down and they continue to anger more and more fans, it’s going to affect the bottom line, of not just the players, but the — the owners.

JEFFY: Because whether it’s true or not, it’s perceived as disrespect for America.

PAT: Right. That’s right.

JEFFY: Whether it’s true or not. So when you have that perception, do something to change it, or have a nice day.

PAT: And in this society, you do have the right to protest. But there’s certain conditions.

For instance, when you’re affecting somebody’s business. And that’s what they’re doing.

JEFFY: And we said — look, when you’re off and we’re not at practice and you want to go down on the street corner and protest, go ahead.

PAT: Do what you want. Do what you want.

Yeah. As long as long as it’s — if I’m an owner, I’m telling them, yes, you’re free to do whatever you want on your off time. But when you’re on the playing field and you’re representing this team and my business and you are in front of my customers, you’ve got to act a certain way, especially when you’re being paid ten or $15 million to do it.

JEFFY: And while the NFL certainly has other limitations on what the other players can wear.

PAT: Yes, they get fined.

JEFFY: They get fined all the time.

PAT: Anything not approved by the NFL —

JEFFY: Right. Gone. Have a nice day.

PAT: Yeah.

JEFFY: I mean, even the one big example they use is, after the police shootings here in Dallas, the Cowboys wanted to wear stickers to represent the police officers.

PAT: Were told no. Yeah, they were told no. Five police officers were — were murdered. And they still couldn’t do a tribute to them. Yeah, sorry. Right. So it is a business.

JEFFY: Maddening.

PAT: And in a business, you have to act a certain way. If your employer tells you to do something, it’s a really good idea to do it. If he tells you not to do something, it’s a really good idea not to do it. If you value your employment.

JEFFY: Right.

PAT: Now, once you’ve been fired and you’re not making that money anymore and you’re not representing that business anymore, do what you want whenever you want. Go ahead. Knock yourself out.

JEFFY: Or if you start working someplace and you realize, you know, I’m not happy with what you expect of me. Get another job.

PAT: Exactly right. It seems simple to me.

JEFFY: It sure does. It sure does. We all have had jobs that we’ve quit, for one reason or another. Whatever reason that is. You have the job. You have the employment. And you realize, look, it’s either better across the street, or I don’t want to do what this job asks of me. I’m going to do something else.

PAT: And it seems like the Saints have a pretty good system where they kneel before the anthem, and then to show respect for the military people serving, the song, they stand. I think that’s great. If your owner is cool with that, keep doing it. If not, maybe you stop. It’s not that hard.

JEFFY: It’s not. And it changes the perception.

PAT: Yes. Yes.

And you do have the constitutional right to do — again, it’s not about that. It’s not about that. Because you also have certain responsibilities to keep your job. You don’t have the right to do whatever you please in the confines of your job. Changes things a little bit.

JEFFY: It sure does.

PAT: There’s certain things I can’t say right now. Well, what about my First Amendment rights? I can’t scream the F word over and over if I want. Well, yes, I could.

JEFFY: Yes, you could.

PAT: And then I wouldn’t be back for the next break. So…

We make certain concessions in this society.

JEFFY: Right.

PAT: To be civilized people.

JEFFY: And if that happens, I’m taking a knee.

PAT: If I got fired for screaming the F-word?

JEFFY: I won’t stand for it, Pat.

PAT: That’s beautiful, thank you.