TIME magazine announced today that its “Person of the Year” issue will honor the “silence breakers,” women and men who spoke out about sexual harassment and assault to spark a movement.

When actress Ashley Judd and other women went on the record to share their stories about film mogul Harvey Weinstein, their accounts of sexual harassment and assault started an avalanche of similar allegations against powerful men in multiple industries.

RELATED: Dan Rather Once Excused Bill Clinton Assault Allegations; ‘It Happened a Long Time Ago’


On today’s show, Glenn talked about TIME’s pick and noted that there are “many lessons” we can all learn from these “silence breakers.”

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

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This is a rush transcript and may contain errors.

GLENN: TIME Magazine has just announced their person of the year. The person of the year. Silence breakers. Yeah, I know. It’s a new boy’s band. The Silence Breakers. No. The silence breakers are the men and women who have finally come forward to talk about the sexual misconduct or assault they experienced at the hands of powerful people.

Now, I happen to agree that this is probably the biggest thing that has happened this year. This is going to — this really makes an impact. But it’s not a person.

It’s people of the year. It’s an event of the year. That’s a movement of the year. That’s not a person of the year. But that’s a feud that I’ve been having with TIME for quite some time. And they don’t seem to care.

Speaking up about assaults by Harvey Weinstein and others like him, TIME claims these victims have been humbled and humanized. And have humbled and humanized Hollywood. They write, movie stars are supposedly nothing like you and me. They’re svelte, glamorous, self-possessed. They wear dresses we can’t afford and live in houses we can only dream of, and yet it turns out that in the most painful and personal ways, movie stars are more like you and me than we’ll ever know.

No, I don’t think this is — do you think this has personalized them? I don’t — no. Uh-uh. Not one story has happened where I thought, you know what, they’re just like me.

Well, that’s because you’re a white guy. Yeah, and I can’t relate to all of the white guy perpetrators. This is not — this is not who we are.

I think it’s — I think it’s an epidemic proportions wherever there is real power. There is real power in Hollywood. There is real power in DC. There is real power in the financial sectors.

We’re just getting started here. It is a fitting homage by — by TIME, given the past three months of non-stop allegations, but I have a problem with it. Juanita Broaddrick and Paula Jones aren’t mentioned by name in TIME’s article. So does this mean that you’re only a silence breaker if you only claim sexual assault in the past few months? Aren’t these silence breakers? Juanita Broaddrick, weren’t they the pioneers that did the hard thing and took it in the face and took the lashes to set the stage for these silence breakers?

Apparently not. Women have been speaking out for years against powerful people and those who abused them. It’s only now that we’re actually listening to them and not saying, well, look at the way she was dressed.

There are many lessons to be learned from the silence breakers. You’re not alone. Even movie stars experience ugly parts of life. Don’t be afraid to speak out.

If you experience assault of any kind, there’s no shame of going to the police immediately. It’s the most powerful thing you can do. And as we’ve seen recently, the court of public opinion is a very dangerous place. An allegation doesn’t immediately make you guilty, from either direction. So let’s continue to hold up due process and ensure that justice grows and prevails for everyone.