In 60 seconds, a compelling story about a woman’s journey from being born with missing limbs to becoming a Paralympic gold medalist. Alpine skier Lauren Woolstencroft was featured in Toyota’s Super Bowl ad documenting her incredible story.

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“It’s revealed that the child is missing both legs below the knee and one arm. But she’s still perfect,” Glenn described the moving ad. “In that one minute, Toyota showed the world that all life matters.”

On today’s show, Glenn covered the best of the Super Bowl ads. Watch the full clip (above) for more.

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

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This is a rush transcript and may contain errors.

GLENN: You know, I like to watch the Super Bowls for the commercials. Usually because the game is just boring as snot. It comes, I know, from somebody who is not a sports fan.

But come on, it’s usually boring as snot. Last night was the exact opposite, in so many ways. I thought the commercials were boring.

And — and yet maybe they weren’t. The commercials last night told us something about what research tells people who are trying to sell us products. Because what they want to do is, they want to convince you, I’m just like you.

So what were they trying to convince us last night? What they trying to say, see, we’re just like you?

A beautiful newborn baby cries and fidgets in her hospital bed. She’s perfect. A nurse lifts her up to comfort her, to reveal that the child is missing both legs beneath the knee in one arm. But she’s still perfect.

That was a Toyota commercial last night. Hitting the ball out of the park. It was — it was a commercial, you know, for Toyota. But it wasn’t. It was about — it was about a Paralympic gold medalist. In 60 seconds, we saw her birth. We saw her struggles to use her mechanical limbs. We saw her failures and we saw her triumph.

Now, if you believe in eugenics, you know, there’s no quality of life for those born with deformities like that. I mean, but how could you possibly think that after watching Lauren thrive and go on to win eight medals? In that one minute, Toyota showed the world that all life matters.

It’s important to notice that — or mention that there were no cars mentioned in the ad. Because that wasn’t the point.

Toyota wanted to reach in and say, we’re just like you. They’ve transitioned — or they are transitioning to something called the mobility company. It’s because cars are going to change.

But they wanted to show that the technology they’re developing is going to help humanity. Dodge also opted to showcase their new technology.

But the car maker was heavily criticized for the commercial. It was a commercial for the Dodge Ram truck. I don’t know if you’ve seen this. Or seen, oh, my gosh, the outrage over it. Martin Luther King was used in the ad. A speech serving as the background. Exactly the way that I don’t even remember who did it last time with Paul Harvey. And this is a farmer. This is the same thing. People are outraged that dodge could use Martin Luther King’s words to sell cars.

I don’t see it that way. Any time we can listen to Martin Luther King, I think, is a good thing. And, boy, do we need to hear his words of empowerment now.

Yes, Dodge was selling their new Ram truck, but they were also selling and reinforcing what we believe about ourselves, but we’re not hearing it.

That we’re good. And we can serve each other. It doesn’t have to be like this.

In 120 seconds, the Toyota and Dodge commercials conveyed the message that advancements in technology could be used for good.

But more importantly, I think in 120 seconds, Dodge and Toyota reflected who we really are and what we want to be.