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GLENN: From Los Angeles on September 11th, 2008, it has been seven years. I want to play some audio from the convention with John McCain where they played this 9/11 thing and I want to? ?I don’t want to make this into politics at all. What I want you to do is I want you to hear the words of Keith Olbermann after they played this tribute to 9/11:

OLBERMANN: I’m sorry, it’s necessary to say this and I wanted to separate myself from the others on the air about this. If at this late date any television network had of its own accord showed that much videotape and that much graphic videotape of 9/11, and I speak as somebody who lost a few friends there, it? ?we? ?would be rightly eviscerated at all quarters perhaps by the Republican party itself for exploiting the memories of the dead and perhaps even for trying to evoke that pain again. If you have reacted to that videotape the way I did, I apologize. It’s a subject of great pain for many of us still and was probably not appropriate to be shown.

GLENN: Okay, stop. I couldn’t disagree with this man any more. On the five year anniversary, five year anniversary of September 11th, I asked CNN to play the video of the collapse of the towers. They’re in a video vault now. Getting those videos on the air took almost an act of God. Nobody wants to show you these videos anymore. Nobody wants you to see these anymore. Everybody blames it on the pain. You know what? On September 11th, September 11th, 2001, we were all in shock. I remember how I felt. Do you? I remember how lost I was. I remember I didn’t know what was coming our way. I had forgotten all about Osama Bin Laden. I warned against him in 1999 and forgot about him. On September 11th I knew what was going on. On September 12th I and you and millions of other Americans stood in line to give blood. They didn’t need any blood. There weren’t going to be any survivors. But as we stood in line on 9/12, we all promised ourselves we would never, ever forget. We all promised ourselves that we would do whatever it took to get these killers. Well, a lot of these killers are still wandering around. But more importantly, a lot of us have become that 9/10 American. We don’t want to be reminded. We don’t want to live through the pain anymore. We don’t want those emotions brought up. Well, you know what? I think those emotions should be brought up.


Last week I told you, last week I was at WOR in New York. Their studios are one block, one block south of the World Trade Center. From their studio you can look around the corner, peer through the buildings and you can see the canyon that is still there. The weekend before, I had gone down to the World Trade Center. I went down to the site. Just three blocks to its south is the giant globe that used to be between the two buildings. The buildings collapsed on it. It’s deformed. It has holes in it. It’s crushed in some parts. It now sits in a park, Battery Park, just about a mile away across the water from the Statue of Liberty. As I took my friends past that, I begged them not to go to the World Trade Centers, "Please don’t go. You’re going to be angry. Just don’t go." Not angry at the right people, angry at us. They said they really wanted to see it. I said okay. My wife, being smarter than I am, made me wear a baseball cap and sunglasses. Thank God for that because I saw something I didn’t expect to see at the World Trade Center on a lazy Saturday afternoon and that is a giant crowd of 9/11 Truthers all gathered by the lip of the canyon. I’m sorry. It’s too right to call it a canyon. It’s too kind. It’s a giant hole in the ground. And I come around the corner and I prepared myself to see again what I had seen right after September 11th. I was standing on the same ground that I stood just a few days after September 11th, as the smoke billowed down the street, as I saw Humvees and razor wire, as I saw the military with automatic weapons for the first time in my life on American streets. I had prepared myself to go stand on the same damn streets that I stood right after 9/11 and remembered the smell of that city. Try as I might, I can never fully get the smell of the rubble of 9/11 out of my nostrils. I had prepared myself for that. I had prepared myself for being upset at the scumbags that have not rebuilt the towers on Ground Zero. I prepared myself for that, but I had not prepared myself to come around the corner and see a group of Americans standing there with signs blaming us for 9/11, claiming that it is a government scandal, a government cover-up, yelling about the media. The 9/11 Truthers like to blame me and say the only way you can explain my career is because I’m the guy who orchestrated the media. I’m the guy who somehow or another, I guess I’m a CIA plant. They are right about one thing. There is no way to explain my career. I’ll give them that. I certainly don’t have enough talent, and I’m not smart enough to be able to figure out the things that I should know at this point in our country’s history. But I am tired of those people who want to put their heads in the sand. I am tired of those who want to pretend this never happened to us. I’m tired of the people on both sides of the aisle that won’t get the damn job done, and I am tired of Americans who just want to point to us. I apologize in advance to Keith Olbermann. If you happen to be listening, you should turn off the radio. I apologize to anyone who doesn’t want to relive 9/11, who doesn’t want to take once a year, just a few minutes out of your day to remember the things that we promised to ourselves and we promised to our brothers and sisters and our friends and neighbors that we would never, ever forget. I apologize to you in advance for keeping the promise I made to you and myself on 9/11.

(911 audio playing)

GLENN: It is Tuesday, September 11th, 2001. This is Glenn Beck. Dateline New York, in one of the most audacious attacks ever, terrorists hijacked two airliners, crashed them into the World Trade Center in a coordinated series of blows today that brought down the twin 110 story towers. Thousands may be dead. 58,000 people work at the World Trade Center. One plane, United Flight 93 crashed north of Somerset County airport, a small airport 80 miles southeast of Pittsburgh. United said that flight, Boeing 757, left Newark at 8:01.

(Audio playing)

GLENN: The voice in the middle of that package said something that stuck out to me today and that is, we’re all Americans. We need to stick together.