Glenn Beck: ArtReview Magazine “Power 100″

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ArtReview ranks Eli Broad, Michael Govan, Glenn Beck among ‘Power 100′

GLENN: From high above, high above Times Square, third most listened to show in all of America. Hello, you sick twisted freak. This is the third most listened to show in all of America and the number 100 most influential person in art. Uh huh, uh huh. (Laughing). What is where did you find this, Stu?

STU: Glenn, this is ArtReview magazine.

GLENN: ArtReview magazine. And what are the criteria? What is this?

STU: Well, the magazine announced this morning the list of art world’s power 100 and several prominent L.A. names were among the illustrious including as you know, and you are very familiar, Pat, Eli Broad who came into the set of

GLENN: Oh, I love Eli. He’s so broad. Oh, Govan is on this?

STU: Govan is on it.

PAT: You couldn’t have a list without Govan.

STU: Obviously I could have just said this but obviously Tim Blum and Jeff Poe sharing Number 31.

GLENN: They share it this year, huh?

STU: Yeah. Obviously 16, just say it with me, Agnes Gund and, of course, at number 28 obviously, Ann Philbin and, of course, number 58, Richard Serra. And at 86 obviously Victorina.

GLENN: Oh, Victorina, finally, finally she’s does it give an explanation of how I made this list?

STU: You are number 100 on the list.

GLENN: So I’m in the hot 100.

STU: Yes.

GLENN: Of the most influential people in art.

STU: Now, shockingly

GLENN: I love this.

STU: Shockingly enough, but the L.A. Times when reporting this story, even with all those gigantic names on the list has used your picture, the guy who’s at number 100, for some reason.

GLENN: Not Victorina Miro?

STU: Or number 20, Mike… Kelley or number 29, Matthew… Higgs. Right. So you’d think with all those pictures to choose from, you wouldn’t

GLENN: Right.

STU: But shockingly enough they put it at number 100, I assume to make fun of well, I was going to say make fun of you because of your art criticism. But maybe there’s something deeper here. Maybe they understand the artistic talent of Glenn Beck.

GLENN: You know what it is? You know what it is? You know what it is? It is this is a very dangerous thing that these people are they are playing with 99 lives. Because artists are very sensitive and now they see my name on there and they are like, this list it’s almost like the Nobel Prize. This list used to mean something. It’s

PAT: Well, it’s like the Maxim hot 100 babes where they took up a space with Michelle Obama.

GLENN: Right.

PAT: And took some, you know, nubile 22 year old buxom babe who had had, you know, $5,000 worth of surgery.

GLENN: Are you saying that I don’t really I am not the most, 100 most important people in the art world?

PAT: In this analogy I suppose you could draw that conclusion.

STU: Oh, I thought you were talking about number 85, Daniel… Buchholz.

PAT: Who’s number one? We haven’t even talked about number one.

STU: Oh, my God, you are right. I can’t even believe this. I’ll give you the top 3 because this is big. Number 3, sir Nicholas Serota. Yeah! Whew.

GLENN: I call him Sir Nick.

STU: At number 2, Glenn D. Lowry!

PAT: Lowry was number 2 this year?

GLENN: That’s a crime.

PAT: I mean, I wouldn’t even put him in the top 10.

STU: Ahead of Larry Gagosian? I mean, come on!

PAT: Larry? I know, I know.

GLENN: Hang on just a second. Do they say why? Is there any explanation?

STU: There is a I didn’t give you number one. People are like, what don’t get cut off now.

GLENN: You wait. Wait for the magazine or the website or whatever this thing is.

STU: Number one is Hans Ulrich Obrist.

GLENN: Yeah.

PAT: For his work did they mention his works this year?

GLENN: It was the blue period. This was for his blue period called ya, sure.

STU: One of the most notable inclusions in this year’s list is political conservative commentator Glenn Beck who came in at number 100. Beck’s place on the list is no doubt due to his recent controversial foray into art criticism when he lambasted art created for New York’s Rockefeller Center.

GLENN: Hang on just a second.

PAT: Or perhaps they saw the George Washington painting. There you go.

GLENN: Could be. No, they haven’t even seen that. I’m changing that. I’ve decided to change that.

STU: To change what?

GLENN: The George Washington painting. Truth and Deceit is what I like to call it. Truth is on the top. It’s Gilbert Stuart’s painting of George Washington, as interpreted by me. And I saw his unfinished work really I’m just practicing for my art interview. I saw his unfinished work really more of a I saw more of the empty space there and I thought, George Washington really just rings truth to me.

PAT: I’ve always looked at that as opulent, not overly ostentatious.

GLENN: And I thought really if this unfinished work were folded, which you never do, but if it were folded and stored some place, well, like the holy shroud of Turin, what would be the reverse of the image of George Washington and truth?

PAT: I see. And your conclusion was?

GLENN: Well, because I thought it was too politically incorrect, I originally had painted FDR. But seeing that I don’t think it could get any worse, I went with the original idea and I repainted over. I’m beginning that process now of putting Barack Obama’s face as the reverse of George Washington.

PAT: Excuse me?

GLENN: Hmmm?

PAT: Excuse me? Who?

GLENN: I just thought it was you know, art is to make to push the edges of society, get you to think, get you out of your comfort zone, you know? It’s the one safe space that we as artists need to do, you know?

PAT: Won’t that be interesting to see if that is a safe space for you.

GLENN: Oh, no, of course it is.

PAT: Of course.

STU: You are one of the most powerful men in art. Of course.

GLENN: I’m one of the most powerful people in art. And I plan on next year being number 25.

STU: Really? You are going to move up?

GLENN: Oh, yeah.

STU: I like it.

PAT: Move up 75 spots?

GLENN: Because there’s no there’s just my love of the openness and the inclusiveness of the art world that has inspired my idea of having an antipropaganda propaganda art show, and we’re doing that here in New York which I think is going to be roundly accepted and praised for its challenge that it presents to society.

STU: You know who I know will be there is, of course, Number 11, Iwan Wirth.

GLENN: Oh, U?

STU: Iwan Wirth.

GLENN: He is. Sir Ted is also going to be there, which he is fantastic.

STU: You know what? At number 14, Jay Jopling, there’s no way you can keep that guy away from there, I’ll tell you that much.

GLENN: Yeah. So I thank you for the honor, art world, and believe me I’m not going to squander that. I’m going to make sure that everybody’s very well aware that you are so accepting of this small humble, dare I say it, just like you, artist.

STU: I just hope the commissioner of art does not come out and say you’re not allowed a list because

GLENN: I’ve been told now I can’t own an art gallery.

STU: Really?

GLENN: Yes.

STU: Wow. The commissioner of art has said that?

GLENN: Yes, the commissioner of art has said that.

 

  • http://twitter.com/whatthebeepny whatthebeepny

    Glenn, Indeed you deserve to be on the Top100 most influential artists list for the 2012 annal. Because your piece, right in line with post-modern standards, hit the mark for powerful confrontation with the establishment, has great shock value, and you exhibit dare devil panache. Your brilliant piece, “Obama in Pee Pee” deserves a mention in art history surveys from here on. You’re right up there with Jeff Koons my friend! You predicted the hypocritical vitriolic protest of the Obama Messianic  worshipers, and put a pin in it! And we heard one loud POP in the dead silence!

  • http://www.facebook.com/tristen.harwell Tristen Harwell

    well your gone now – 4:16 pm Dec. 20th, just looked at it and #100 is now 100. Gregor Podnar