Glenn & Rev. Al Sharpton


Learn more about the Restoring Honor Rally, 8/28 in Washington DC…

GLENN: Here’s a headline for you.

STU: Okay.

PAT: Give me a headline.

GLENN: Glenn Beck claims that much of what he’s done this year in African American study and on air presentation was Al Sharpton’s idea.

STU: It’s true!

GLENN: Let me explain.

STU: Yeah.

GLENN: Al Sharpton was on the set. Al Sharpton and I have a decent relationship. I think he’s, you know Al Sharpton, you know

PAT: You guys hang out on weekends.

GLENN: Al Sharpton is Al Sharpton.

PAT: How many barbecues and you and Al been to?

GLENN: You know who Al Sharpton is and I marched with Al Sharpton to keep my word.

STU: That’s right, against rap music.

GLENN: He came after Don Imus and I said, look, what Don Imus did was stupid, and I said, but you know that’s not and really? Don Imus? All this over Don Imus? What about rap music? And he said, well, I march all the time against rap music. I said, do you? He said, yeah. Well, when I do, are you going to march with me? And I said, yeah, I’ll march with you. If you are going to do that, I’ll march with you. He said to me as we were walking, he said, I can’t believe you’re here. It wasn’t pleasant. It wasn’t popular for me to march with Al Sharpton, but I did it because I told him I would.

STU: And you agree on that topic.

GLENN: And I agree on that. As we I did an interview with him as we marched together, arm in arm, I might point out. Locked and linked arms.

PAT: Sweating?

GLENN: And I said to him, I want you to know, Al, I said, I don’t agree with intimidation, I don’t agree with this kind of you know, you just don’t buy the rap album. You don’t intimidate, you don’t boycott. You just don’t buy the album. You speak out against it and you get parents to make sure their kids aren’t listening to that crap. And, you know, I said I disagree, but I appreciate it. And he said, I can’t believe you showed up. I cannot believe you showed up. And I said, I’m a man of my word.

So we’ve had you know, we don’t agree on very much, but we’ve had an interesting relationship. He was on my set one time over at Fox and I had him on and we had a great conversation, and he said I think it was on the air. He said at one point, "You know, I like that Faith, Hope, Charity, you know, but I think you should have a few black faces up there." And I said, good idea. There is the genesis. That is the genesis of looking for the black founding fathers. I didn’t think of that. Al Sharpton did. I’m stealing history. Well, talk to Al about it because it was his idea.

STU: That’s true. And you had credit from magazines, the Root magazine which is a you know, targeted

GLENN: Restoring

STU: African Americans. And they said that, you know, hey, look, we don’t agree with Glenn on a lot, but he’s told the truth about the founding fathers that were African American.

PAT: Weren’t you the number one blackest white guy?

STU: You were.

PAT: Because of it?

GLENN: Number one black white guy.

PAT: Yeah.

STU: I don’t know if you were number one but you were on the

PAT: One or two.

GLENN: I think I was for one.

PAT: One or two.

GLENN: I think there was a woman in front of me. She was the blackest white woman.

STU: Right. Congratulations on that, by the way.

GLENN: I think it was Lady Gaga, wasn’t it?

PAT: It might have been, or Christina Aguilera.

STU: You guys are always on the same list, you guys are always.

GLENN: But I think I was the number one black white man in America, for that. Well, it was Al Sharpton’s idea.

PAT: I would love to I would love to see that headline now. Now that you’ve said this and it’s Al Sharpton’s idea, you’ve knitted that, I’d love to see that splashed all over the place, Mediaite.

GLENN: Can I tell you, let me go a step further. In that same conversation on the air I think it was on the air. It may have been right after, you know, the cameras went off, but I think it was on the air. He said to me something along the lines, we were talking about the tea party and he said and he said it very, almost confrontational. He said, you see? Now do you understand what we’ve been going through? Now do you understand? And I said, yeah, yeah, I’m beginning to, Al. I’ve understood it intellectually. I didn’t say this to him on the air, but I understood racism intellectually, but most white people have never really experienced it. Their first real experience of an unjust government comes from the Black Panthers. You see the Black Panthers and you are like, wait a minute, this is so clear. This is voter intimidation! Well, that’s what people like Martin Luther King and Al Sharpton and everybody else, that’s what they went through. That’s what we were supposed to stop and fight against, and we did. Not in all cases. But we need to be vigilant. Black and white. And I think there is a historic opportunity to be able to now connect with all colors, because we all get it. And we should all stand there and say it’s wrong. Another idea of Al Sharpton’s on 8/28. It’s fantastic.

PAT: So join us one and all. I mean, this is going to be such a you were describing, you were describing the end of the rally to us right before we went on the air. I actually have chills all over my body just hearing it, the description the way you presented it this morning. It is going to be unbelievable.

GLENN: I kept this close to my chest. I haven’t even told these guys until this morning because I just don’t want I don’t want it to get out. I don’t want anybody to know. And I described the ending. It was like right before 9:00. I told everybody what exactly was going to happen on 8/28, the last 10 minutes of it. And I think actually Stu was I mean, you were almost welling up there.

STU: Almost. You know, it’s one of those things, because we’ve been, you know this has been, to this point, largely an exercise in planning for us. I mean, you know, we’ve been working a lot behind the scenes, what’s going to happen, how are these things going to come together, what’s the media coverage on it. All that nonsense that goes up to it, and it’s just starting to hit me that this thing’s actually going to happen, it’s this huge historic event that we’re actually going to be part of and then when you kind of like you were just saying, it’s I have understood it intellectually this whole time. But when you, you know, describe the way this thing is going to end, I mean, it’s going to be so powerful. I’m just starting to feel it now. And it’s getting exciting.

PAT: You’ll cry like a girl.

STU: Yes.

PAT: You’ll cry like a little girl.

STU: No doubt about it.

PAT: There’s just no question.

GLENN: That’s the thing I don’t want to do.

STU: Oh, you have no chance, no chance.

PAT: Oh, you don’t want to?

GLENN: Oh, my gosh.

PAT: Oh, you’re gonna oh, please.

GLENN: It’s just, I just don’t want to but I when I stood at the Lincoln Memorial, what was it, Pat, how many

PAT: Couple of months, two, three months.

GLENN: A couple of months ago. I was so overwhelmed by the weight of it. By the that is a sacred space. When we get there, when we get there, I ask that you would introduce yourself to your fellow audience members. Anybody who is there with your family and everybody else, you introduce and you lock arms. I would love to see that audience locked in arms. You are all different from each other, you don’t know each other. You get to know each other. I’d like people to have however many people show up, 100,000 people. I’d like 100,000 friends by the time we walk out.

STU: Yeah. I mean, you’ve been talking a lot about Woodstock over, you know, the past couple of weeks about how it really is one of those things that, you know, people remember forever. And that’s one of the things people talk about, outside of the idiotic sort of nonsense of Woodstock. So many people made such, you know, such great relationships that lasted for such a long time.

PAT: Well, when you are having sex with people you don’t know, a lot of times, you know, you might call them up later on in life.

STU: I mean, if you don’t

PAT: Say, hey, remember we had sex in Woodstock in the mud?

STU: Remember in the mud?

PAT: We didn’t even know each other’s names?

GLENN: Your mom actually talked

PAT: Remember that?

GLENN: Jeffy, was it his mom?

STU: Please expand. Please don’t stop there. I don’t know how to

GLENN: I’m sorry, I’m sorry, I’m sorry. Yeah, you’re right. Was it your mom and his mom that were supposed to go and at the last minute their parents said, no?

STU: Yeah, my mom actually just, I guess there’s a concert venue up there now. I don’t know if it’s in the exact same place or near it. And she just went to a concert up there. And to her it was sort of like this finally getting there because she wanted to go really badly. Her mom said no. Again my grandmother, a very wise woman, very wise to stop her. But she finally got up there. And to her this was like a, you know, 30 I don’t know, how many years now? 40 year making.

GLENN: Jeffy said the same thing. I was talking to Jeffy yesterday. Jeffy in the studio?

STU: Yeah.

JEFF: Yeah.

GLENN: Jeffy, who was it?

JEFF: Well, it was my first wife. It wasn’t my mother. My first wife. And she had it all set up to go and then ended up not being able to go and was disappointed forever.

STU: Yeah.

JEFF: I mean, we get the Time magazine and the Rolling Stone anniversary issues and she would look through them like, I should have been there.

PAT: Your first wife was old enough to go to Woodstock? How old are you, Jeffy?

STU: He’s 84. That’s not that bad.

PAT: Wow. Wow.

JEFF: Yeah, that’s my first wife. I went the other direction the next two.

GLENN: You went for an older woman, like a much, much, much older woman?

PAT: Like she was 40 when you married her?

GLENN: The first time. You were 20, she was 40? That’s really

JEFF: Well

GLENN: disturbing.

STU: Just because it’s Jeffy. It’s not disturbing in the normal context. Anything Jeffy does is disturbing.

GLENN: Here’s the thing. You don’t want to miss this. If you’ve been on the fence, commit. Go. You don’t want to miss this.

STU: Yeah, I just had a friend who e mailed me yesterday who had we hadn’t really talked about the rally at all and he just said him and his wife to be are going to be going down there.

PAT: You don’t need tickets.

STU: Yeah, you don’t need tickets.

PAT: People keep asking, how do I get tickets? You don’t need tickets. Just go. Just show up.

GLENN: Just go. Leave your signs at home. Leave them at home. You’ll understand it when you get there. This is a totally different thing. You’ll never I promise you, you will never experience anything like this. You never have experienced anything like this. This is historic. Make sure you’re there. Next Saturday, a week from tomorrow at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.