8.28.10: The Documentary

This is our first full-length documentary and it’s going to blow you away. It’s an exclusive inside look at the making of the 8-28 Rally. When we say exclusive, we mean it. From the time Glenn arrived in Washington DC to the time he took the stage our cameras were rolling. You will not believe what went on behind the scenes. Learn more…

GLENN: I want to go to Walter in Indiana. Hello, Walter, welcome.

CALLER: Hey, Glenn, how you doing this morning?

GLENN: Very good, how are you?

CALLER: Well, listen. I’m sitting here with the owner’s manual for our country and our people and our souls. I have the Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, and the Holy Bible.

GLENN: Yes, sir.

CALLER: And I’m absolutely infuriated with all of these people passing out first place trophies to last place people that run last. I’m sick of it. It does an injustice to the people and it does an injustice to our country. My daughter is 10 years old and I pride myself in making sure that she does her homework and is the best she can be.

GLENN: Yes.

CALLER: She comes home from school and instead of running out into the trailer park for two hours playing with the other kids, I make sure she pounds the books and gets everything right. The other day she comes home and I said, how did you do on your social studies test? She goes, Dad, I did wonderful, I got an A plus again. And I go congratulations. She goes, but Daddy, we’re going to have to take the test again. I go, excuse me? She goes, yes, Mrs. Brown says we have to take the test again. She’s in fifth grade. I go, that can’t be right, honey, why? Now, this is out of my daughter’s mouth. She takes a breath and she sighs and she looks at me: Daddy, all of the other children in the class except for two of us did terrible because they don’t study much. So the teacher said, quote, we’re going to have to retake this test over and over again until the scores for our classroom come up. Well, that was it. I seen enough, you know? We talk about separation, you got to separate, you got to do your own thing, you’ve got to live by these basic rules. I went stomping over to the classroom and I asked the teacher, I said, is this really possible? She looks and me like inquisitive, well, why wouldn’t it be? Quote Glenn, I can’t even make this up: We have to wait for the other children to catch up. And I said, no, we’re not going to waste time with my daughter. Can’t for the 15 or 20 minutes while all of the other children are, quote, catching up? Can’t you give us some other stuff to push her forward? And this is what she said to me, Glenn: It will make the other children in the class feel not as equal.

GLENN: Oh, gosh.

CALLER: That was it, Glenn. I’ve tried as hard as I can to be in the system. That was it. I took her out of class. I said, we’re done. I’m scared to death, but I’m as excited as I can be. I’m going to get all of the old school Constitution, the declaration, George Washington, Ben Franklin and I’m going to teach her about a great history of our people and our ancestry. And I’m tired of this country accepting mediocrity. I’m tired of these people lowering the bar saying we’re all equal. Glenn, when we were born out of our mothers, we’re all equal. But when we start walking and talking and doing all these other things, there’s a big disparity. And when I spend my two hours making sure my teacher, my child is reading and writing and these kids are out there running around like hoodlums not paying attention, my child has to suffer? It’s time for America to get right and it all starts in the home. It comes from yes, sir, no, ma’am, thank you, get on your knees and pray to God. And I want to hail you and I want to thank you guys for waking people up and standing there and just telling the truth. And that’s about it.

GLENN: Walter, I’ve got to tell you something. I think you’re amazing. I think this is fantastic. Make sure that you teach your child, as I’m sure you will, charity, love, respect, and


CALLER: Honor.

GLENN: You keep going. You’re darn right, honor.

CALLER: When my daughter has her friends over to the house, I know I don’t want to take too much time. And then the parents that see when the kids that stay for the day or sleep over and then come home, the next day I’d get a phone call and the parents will say, Wally, can I ask you a question? Sure, why? Well, when our children were over to the house, is it true that they got on their hands and knees and scrubbed the kitchen floors with rags? And I go, well, sure. And I go, well, why did they have to do that? I said, well, they wanted a meal. See, we’ve all got to row our boat. We’ve all got to be in the boat. We’ve all got to row as one. And if you are not going to row, get the hell out of the way or stop getting in mine. And I want to thank you because you’re just like the highlight of our day. We laugh and joke. Because we’ve felt this way our whole lives. And it’s great for somebody to have a light bulb on and to say, look, the truth is the truth. And you can dress it up, you can do it, but the truth is going to set you free. And you think it’s an accident in this country when you go to St. Louis and you see these great, great monuments but then you step outside of the monument and our inner cities and our cities are falling apart with decadence and slums? We used to be champions. We used to be heroes. We were these great pioneers with a dream. And our head to the sky and our knees in the ground thanking our Good Lord. And look what we’ve turned into. A social network of give me and "I’m entitled" and you just keep up the good work, brother, because I’m going to keep it on our end and anytime you’re in Indiana, you come on out.

GLENN: Walter, I love you, man. Thank you very much.

CALLER: We’ll do some cow tipping, how’s that?

GLENN: You got it. You got it. Thank you very much.

STU: I love that guy.

GLENN: I love him. I love him.

STU: He’s from Indiana. Is that a borough of New York City?

GLENN: Let me tell you something. If you’ve read "Atlas Shrugged," and even if you haven’t, you may have asked yourself this question: Isn’t there some place I can just go? I just want to take my family, I want to be I want to be safe, I want to be I want the 8/28 experience where we don’t all agree with each other and we’re not all, you know, we’re not all white. We’re just all Americans. And we’re just trying to be decent to each other. And we’ll hold ourselves to a higher standard: Hey, knock it off. We will say those things to each other. But we’ll also say, are you okay? There is no place like that. The pilgrims came here for that. The immigrants came here for that. How sad is it that we now look at this land and say, "Where can we go?" If you’ve read "Atlas Shrugged," where is John Galt? John Galt left. The pioneers, the inventors, the doers, they left. They found at this time, if you read "Atlas Shrugged," it reads like today. It was at this time that John Galt just disappeared. Where’s John Galt? Where is the head of this corporation? Where is this inventor? Where are all the great minds? Where are they going? What are they doing? Well, they had found a place where they could just go disappear, be off the radar and just live the life that they wanted to. You might ask where is that place. It doesn’t exist. There is no place like that. If you’re looking for a physical place. But I am telling you now, I am about to go all John Galt. We were talking in the break and Pat, I think, said 8/28 has changed you. And Stu said what was it you said, Stu? It’s changed you

STU: You seem like you’re like, above the fray more. Like you just don’t want to deal with the nonsensical back and forth of it all.

GLENN: And it has changed me in a material way. It has changed me to the very core of my being. And I’m about to go all John Galt. But there is no place to disappear to. It is just the unplugging of the system. It is just the unwillingness to play the game. It is the unwillingness it is the willingness to say the game you are playing is corrupt. The game and the rules and the system that you have set up is a system of slavery and oppression. And I’m not going to play it. It is exactly you know what just happened on the phone call? A man in Indiana went all John Galt. That’s what happened. He unplugged from the system. He’s still in the community, he’s still around you, but he’s decided he’s going to be a positive source. He is going to make sure that his daughter is a clay pot, his daughter has everything in her to preserve the idea of merit and honor and integrity, of individualism, of charity, of faith. So his daughter is a seed that will be allowed to be planted. He is not only planting that seed now, he is watering it and nourishing that seed. And that seed will grow and inspire others. When they have been beaten down by this system, when they have no future in this system, when they have been filled with lies, someone will be able to stand up. I don’t know where we go. I don’t know how this works. I don’t know what tomorrow brings, but it may not be on a radio broadcast. It may just be on it may just be over the fence to your neighbor. But you must see yourself as an individual not just inside the system that is the voice of America. So if, God forbid, they stomp out the ideals and the values and the principles that have made this country the life changing country, the life changing system of this planet, whether it be over the airwaves, whether it be over shortwave, whether it is offshore, whether it is just at a barbecue at your neighbor’s house, you be the voice of freedom. Your children are the voice of America. Do not ever let them take it. Unplug from a corrupt system and be a positive force in that they don’t know what to do with it. Be a positive force in this system. Be an example that others will look at. You may think it makes no difference. I know this because of my best friend Pat. When I was at the biggest dirt bag stage of my life, my best friend Pat never faltered. Never faltered. I never saw the man live outside of his principles and his values, not once, not ever. And quite honestly it pissed me off. Because if he could do it, it meant I had to be able to do it, too. And I couldn’t do it at the time. But he never faltered. And when I was at my lowest point, he was there just quietly saying, "You know what? There life doesn’t have to be this hard." And I wasn’t ready to hear him until I was into my storm. And because he had weathered every storm, storms that are beyond your wildest imagination, not a perfect family by any stretch. His family has gone through storms. I’m sorry. I hope you don’t mind me telling this, Pat. But his family has gone through storms that are bigger than my family’s storms, and he made it, and his family came out the other end. Well, when I was in my storms, "Okay, all right, how are you doing it." That’s who you need to be. You need to be John Galt so the system doesn’t corrupt you. Unplug. Spit yourself out of the system. Go all John Galt on them. It doesn’t mean you have to go find some place to live. It means you just live the way you know you’re supposed to. And be a shining example of goodness and courage and temperance and frugality and common sense and faith and honor, and you and your children will change the world.