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Producer J.P.: The scope of Man in the Moon is staggering

The past two nights I’ve been able to see about 50 percent of Man In the Moon.

It really didn’t hit me how big this production really is until last night. Seeing the moon rising above the stage, watching the dancers, listening to the amazing soundtrack and hearing the story, really opened my eyes to the importance of this story being told in this massive production.

It’s amazing how many people are helping to produce this show. The best of the best from around the country and the world right here in Utah all willing to help one man who had a story and an idea. A story that needs to be told to America…To wake America up.

The soundtrack is beyond one of the most amazing things I’ve ever heard. When we were in the studio on Monday night listening to the full soundtrack of the show, everyone realized that something important is happening in Salt Lake City this week. The music is more then just brilliant people who wrote the music, it has so much power and emotion to it. It will be something you have never before heard.

So far this has been an amazing experience, I have never been more proud to work for a man who is not afraid to go above and beyond, to step outside of the box that we Americans have put our creativity and imagination in. I have never been more proud to work for a company who is willing to do what no one else will, tell the truth. Be willing to stand for truth when no one else will stand.

You all are in for a treat.

Morning Meeting fun

Morning meeting with Glenn, Stu & Pat. Pat was poking fun at Glenn’s shirt. Funny, but wrong. – Joe Kerry, Chief of Staff

Intern Blog: Perry goes to Washington

As if moving from a mountain in Tennessee to New York City isn’t scary enough, imagine working for a powerful company run by Glenn Beck and being sent to DC the second week on the job.

My first week working for TheBlaze consisted of analyzing app reviews, selecting pictures for the website, reading through a bazillion fan mail e-mails and meeting the one and only Glenn Beck (this all being much more than I’ve done in my other five jobs combined). During this busy week, I was also told I would be attending a quick trip to DC with two other marketing interns. We were asked to tag along to a reception hosted by TheBlaze, which promoted getting TheBlaze on cable and the event also discussed the importance of media in the future. This event had cream of the crop speakers including Senator Ted Cruz, Senator Rand Paul, Representative Marsha Blackburn, and Senator Mike Lee.

After waking up at 5:00 AM we embarked on a train to DC – this train was slower than the cars on the interstate – and arrived in the nation’s capital around 11:00 AM and went straight to the venue.

Arriving in DC was incredible. It was very refreshing to see blue sky without skyscrapers obstructing the view and smell fresh air without the smell of sewage (but don’t get me wrong, I heart NYC). Upon arriving at the stunning and delicious Acadiana restaurant, we stuffed 150 gift bags that contained some great info on how to get TheBlaze. After running out of red tissue paper with only a few bags left, Nancy and I went to the closest convenient store looking for the essential ingredient to make the gift bags look like a fiery blaze. The women at the CVS said there was a “great gift shop a few blocks away”, but I learned a few blocks in DC doesn’t mean the same thing in New York. After a hike to this “gift shop”, we arrived at the address and gift shop it was not. Actually it wasn’t even remotely close. It was a grocery store and butcher shop. So unless the woman at CVS just wanted us to stuff the bags red meat, the thirty-minute trip wasn’t worth it.

We finally arrived back at the restaurant and eagerly waited for the guests to arrive. Although a minor role, our job was to man the welcome table and hand out nametags and gift bags. I loved this job for two reasons. One because we were lucky enough to greet the guests and meet the all the wonderful congressmen who spoke at the event. Being the star struck young adult that I am, when Senator Ted Cruz and Rand Paul approached the table I started to slur my words when we thanked him for coming. The same thing happened when Glenn Beck walked by and I shot him an awkward smile and wave, as if we had been friends for years. We haven’t. Clearly I panic in the presence of greatness.

The second reason I loved working the welcome table was because we were next to the kitchen and all the food that was brought out on trays came by our table first. And being a college student interning in NYC, receiving free food is like having a birthday every day.

Unfortunately we were not able to be in the room with all these fabulous people, but the good news is we could hear everything that was being said. It was truly amazing to hear these politicians speak, and it was even more amazing to me that senators who have so much influence in government came to support this company. When I had a little free time, I slipped into the room a few times to hear Senator Cruz joke about Glenn Beck broadcasting from jail one day, and Senator Paul imitate the silent monologue by Glenn Beck from his show the night before.

I was lucky enough to meet and take a picture with Senator Ted Cruz, but of course with my luck something went wrong. My camera must have had the same reaction I did in the presence of greatness and panicked because THIS is what the picture looked like.

I don’t think I will ever be in a room with such influential people in my life. Being in this room full of people who are so passionate about what they do is truly inspiring. Every single person who works for this company is so passionate about TheBlaze and it really shows. My role in the reception was pretty minor, but it was by far the best and most memorable day of work I’ve ever had. TheBlaze is making their imprint in history, and yesterday I saw a glimpse of how truly amazing this company really is.

- Perry

Intern Blog: Lauren’s first day in Texas sent her to Oklahoma to provide disaster relief

Most people’s first day of a new job or internship includes sitting at a cubicle, filling out some paperwork, and trying (and usually failing) to connect to the company’s computer server. My first day as an intern with Mercury One involved helping with disaster relief work in the heart of Oklahoma. I quickly learned that nothing deters this incredible organization. Although severe storms were once again pounding Oklahoma this past weekend – to be quite honest, I’m deathly afraid of tornadoes and was more than a little nervous about the trip – the team was on the ground within hours. I pulled together my courage, packed my backpack, and joined Mercury One for a humbling, moving, and life-changing experience.

Those of us new to disaster relief did not know what to expect as we drove in to Oklahoma. At first, everything seemed normal. As we suddenly turned a street corner, however, our eyes fell upon the desolation. Joel, a fellow intern, said in amazement, “When we first got there and were looking at the neighborhoods, you’d see a single devastated street or house – just a small window of destruction. And then you’d look up and see that everywhere there was nothing.” I had seen pictures in the media, but being there in person left me speechless. Homes were reduced to a pile of rubble, yet parts of everyday life still caught my attention: a toothbrush caught between two bricks, a stuffed animal poking out from underneath a piece of concrete, the game Battleship lying on the side of a road. These small remnants of people’s possessions forced us to remember that this was not debris; it was the lives, hopes, and dreams of men, women, families, and children.

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Doc Thompson & Skip LaCombe finish 24 hour broadcast

Congrats to Doc Thompson & Skip LaCombe for pulling off an amazing 24 hour broadcast. Things got a little weird during the late hours, but they pulled it off!

This is what awesome radio (and regret) look like around 3am and 19 hours into a broadcast.

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