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Dog Show Gender Gap? Journalist Is Worried About a ‘Glass Ceiling for Dogs’

What happened? 

Male domination in the world of … dog shows?

A Reuters report has exposed a neglected facet of male and female inequality: About twice as many male dogs as female dogs have won “Best in Show” over the last century at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in New York.

That’s not how any of this works …

After female dogs win, they typically “retire” and are used for breeding more show dogs. That gives male dogs an advantage since they can compete longer while still being able to stud, according to Reuters writer Stephanie Kelly. Female dogs are reportedly limited by their bodies.

“Males can keep going,” Westminster Kennel Club spokeswoman Gail Miller Bisher told Reuters. “They can be used as stud and continue showing and keep their coat and keep their shape of body and all that.”

Glenn’s take: 

Glenn tried to explain this horrifying example of gender inequality to Stu on today’s show. Watch his tongue-in-cheek reaction in the clip (above).

This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

GLENN: So Stu has been telling me through the commercial break there's no such thing as dog equality. And I said, you're exactly right, Stu. And that's the problem.

STU: Well, I wasn't saying it was a problem, per se. You seem to be indicating that dogs aren't equal to humans. And it doesn't say that's correct.

GLENN: No, I'm not even talking about that. I'm talking about dog equality. Dogs between dogs. Male against female.

STU: Oh --

GLENN: There's a glass ceiling for dogs, Stu.

STU: Oh, you're saying equality for dogs within the dog world?

GLENN: Yes. Let me give you the story from Reuters, and you are going to change your tune.

Writing for Reuters, Stephanie Kelly highlights how male domination in the -- in the dog world has become so bad that she now has to ask the question, is there a glass ceiling for dogs?

And the problem here is the females have to eventually retire from what they want to do, to go have puppies. And that keep them out of the competition world. And they can't compete.

STU: Because what they want -- what the dog wants to do is be in a competition?

GLENN: Yeah. Oh, my gosh.

For instance, the -- the winning female German Shepherd from last year at Westminster Competition, rumor. Not returning this year, because she had to become a mom. And so now she's a mom. So she's a stay at home mom that can no longer -- can no longer compete.

And it's because, quote, of this unfair truth of biology, that female dogs have been taken -- have taken home the award for best in show. They've only -- they've only won 39 times.

Just a little over half the number of times the male dogs have won. And -- and gender equality, it's not there. There's only 1,220 females, versus almost 1700 males competing.

And she also wanted to point out in her Reuters story that of the oppressive language involved.

STU: The oppressive language involved?

GLENN: Yeah.

STU: What oppressive -- can I ask, for example?

GLENN: What do you call a male dog?

STU: A dog.

GLENN: Right. What do you call a female dog?

No. No. Technically, they're --

STU: Right. I get what you're saying. But no one uses that technology.

GLENN: They do in the breeding realm.

STU: But it's not a negative in the breeding realm. It's just the name for female dog in the breeding realm.

GLENN: I don't even know what to say to you. You're such a Neanderthal. Oh, my gosh.

GLENN: I guess I am.

STU: Because I noticed in horse racing, for example, a male horse that might win a race or two, will be retired. Go to stud as they call it. Right?

GLENN: Yeah. A stud. And what is she?

What is she?

STU: What is who?

GLENN: What is the female horse? She becomes a nag.

(laughter)

STU: I guess that's true.

GLENN: So you've got the stud and the nag. The dog and the bitch. I mean, you want to talk about a glass ceiling, won't poor dogs.

STU: Wait. Why are you assuming these dogs care about winning these competitions at all?

GLENN: Because I read it from Kelly somebody or other at Reuters. She knows. She's been writing about the dog shows for a while now, I hear.

STU: You hear.

GLENN: She also says, aside from the breeding, competition can be rather taxing on female dogs, which can cause a change in temperament and hormones.

When a female dog enters a cycle every six months, some owners will forego showing it altogether because, quote, they're moody.

STU: No.

GLENN: I'm quoting from the article.

STU: That's not real.

GLENN: I'm quoting from the Reuters article.

Depending on the breed, a female dog in season will shed her coat, leaving her less impressive looking than her male peers. These kind of changes knock her out of the competition for months. And what does that mean?

That the male dogs have a better chance of winning. There's a glass ceiling for dogs in the dog world, Stu. And you don't care.

STU: I -- you know what, you're right. I mean, not about the ceiling part, but the I don't care part.

GLENN: Isn't that incredible?

STU: That's an incredible story.

GLENN: That's my favorite story from the weekend. I just --

STU: You like that better than the Olympics story that I was telling you about? I thought that was a pretty important one.

GLENN: The Olympics story? What was the --

STU: Not the North Korea one. The other big one from the weekend. Well, 11 big ones.

GLENN: I don't know what you're talking about.

STU: From Buzzfeed.

GLENN: Well, I don't frequent Buzzfeed.

RADIO

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