Critical race theory: Marx and 1984

Photo by Viktor Forgacs on Unsplash

In 1984 by George Orwell, Room 101 of the Ministry of Love is where evil itself resides. Big Brother monitors every citizen, so The Party knows every single person's greatest fears. Room 101 is the last resort for torture. The final phase of re-education. Nobody emerges from Room 101 without submitting to Big Brother, without betraying everyone they know in service of Big Brother.

Winston, the main character, undergoes every type of torture imaginable. Through beatings, sensory deprivation, forced starvation, and all kinds of psychological torture. And, still, he refused to talk. He'd remained unshakable for so long.

The thing that is in Room 101 is the worst thing in the world.

Winston is forced to watch other prisoners go into Room 101. Eventually, it's his turn. A member of The Party named O'Brien straps him to a chair.

“You asked me once," says O'Brien, “what was in Room 101. I told you that you knew the answer already. Everyone knows it. The thing that is in Room 101 is the worst thing in the world. It varies from individual to individual. It may be burial alive, or death by fire, or by drowning, or by impalement, or fifty other deaths. There are cases where it is some quite trivial thing, not even fatal."

The door opens again. A guard comes in, carrying something made of wire, a box or basket of some kind. He sets it down on the further table. Because of the position in which O'Brien is standing. Winston cannot not see what the thing is.

“In your case," says O'Brien, "the worst thing in the world happens to be rats."

One of the other methods of torture involves negative feedback—what Leftists would call “gaslighting." It means convincing someone that they're absolutely insane—that they no longer have a grasp on reality.

Life has become so much like 1984 that we can look at the torture scenes and actually somewhat relate.

At one point, O'Brien tells Winson, “We do not merely destroy our enemies, we change them." Compare that to this quote: “The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it." That's Karl Marx, describing the Marxist mission. And this requires every aspect of life to be determined by political activism.

This idea has not gone away. I'm sure you've noticed. It's practically the mission statement of the Left today.

A few years before his death, Orwell said, "Every line of serious work that I have written since 1936 has been written, directly or indirectly, against totalitarianism."

The entire dystopia of 1984 is based on The Soviet Union. Let's just say it's no coincidence that Big Brother has a mustache.

This post is part of a series on critical race theory. Read the full series here.

BIGGER than Tiananmen Square? Here's what the China protests are REALLY about

(Left) Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images/ (Right) Video screenshot

China has been locking its citizens down for over two years under its zero-COVID policy, and it's becoming more and more clear that this isn’t just about COVID but something much more serious: slavery and control. Now it looks like many citizens have had enough. Protests are currently spreading throughout China and, unlike during the Tiananmen Square protests, the word is getting out.

On Monday's radio program, Glenn Beck looked into the protests' "real motivations," explained how they’re different from the 1989 protests at Tiananmen Square, and predicted how these events are a "game-changer for the entire world."

Watch the video clip below. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

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The American Journey Experience is the new home of the car Orson Welles gave to Rita Hayworth. Orson Welles gave this car to his future wife Rita Hayworth for her 24th birthday.

George Orson Welles was an American actor, director, producer, and screenwriter who is remembered for his innovative and influential work in film, radio and theatre. He is considered to be among the greatest and most influential filmmakers of all time and his work has had a great impact on American culture.

Every year as Thanksgiving approaches, the fear of politics being brought up at the dinner table is shared by millions around the country. But comedian Jamie Kilstein has a guide for what you should do to avoid the awkward political turmoil so you can enjoy stuffing your face full of turkey.

Kilstein joined "The Glenn Beck Program" to dissect exactly how you can handle those awkward, news-related discussions around the table on Thanksgiving and provided his 3-step guide to help you survive the holidays with your favorite, liberal relatives: Find common ground, don’t take obvious bait, and remember that winning an argument at the cost of a family member won’t fix the issue you’re arguing about.

Watch the video clip below. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn’s masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis, and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.

On Friday, Mercury One hosted the 2022 ProFamily Legislators Conference at The American Journey Experience. Glenn Beck shared this wisdom with legislators from all across our nation. We must be on God’s side.