Glenn Beck: Eater X






Dan's Calorie Challenge...

GLENN: It is Friday, and yesterday we issued Dan an Olympic challenge and he was too much of a wuss, too much of a is it a wuss, Stu, or more just like an 8 year old girl?

STU: Yeah, a lot of people are just calling it a wuss girly failure is what most people are.

GLENN: It really was a girly failure. We said, you know, eat like an Olympic athlete. How a man can't eat like an Olympic athlete is really, I mean is really quite surprising, disappointing. I don't know. How would you describe it, Stu?

STU: I would describe it as expected.

GLENN: Girly man loss?

STU: When it comes to Dan, you just expect failure.

GLENN: So yesterday I said, you know, you've got to eat like Phelps, 12,000 calories. He couldn't do it in one sitting. "Oh, no, 12,000 calories, I can only get, what was it, 3400, something like that at the end of the show yesterday?"

DAN: By the end of the show I had, what, 3400, three hours, 3400.

GLENN: And you almost fell asleep at the end of the show?

DAN: I did. The milk shake almost put me in a food coma. I was surprised myself because the similarities between Michael Phelps and myself are just so striking. I mean, we're just, you know, just top athletes and in great shape. I mean, he can swim across the pool a million times. I can go up and down my stairs like once or twice before getting winded. So the similarities are there.

STU: When you put it that way, Dan, it is worse.

GLENN: It really, it is, it is. I don't think I want to hear the similarities or the differences on the breast stroke with you, either. But let's help you out a bit because yesterday at the end of the show I issued you a challenge: Okay, if you can't do it in three hours, then let's see if you can do it in 27 hours.

DAN: Right.

GLENN: And you have been eating since we left the program yesterday.

DAN: Yeah. I mean, I took a little bit of a break because it was you know.

GLENN: You took a nap.

DAN: Yes.

GLENN: So how many calories are you up to now?

DAN: I'm closing in on just shy of 8,000 calories. 7600 or something like that.

STU: 7548 is the official tally.

GLENN: Dan, I want you to know we got you a coach. We got you an eating

DAN: Really?

GLENN: Yes, we got you an eating coach. His and I'm not kidding you. This is serious. He is known by Eater as Eater X. He is a professional eater. His name is Tim Janus wait a minute. Tim, can I have I blown your cover as Eater X?

JANUS: No, that's okay, don't worry about it.

GLENN: Eater X anything like Racer X?

JANUS: I think it is but I didn't give myself a nickname. It's something you have to earn like respect or a contribution. I'm not really sure of the exact origin of it.

GLENN: Do you get a lot of respect being a professional eater?

JANUS: I don't know. At least to my face I do. I'm not sure what people say when I leave the room.

GLENN: Sure, sure. And you finished third in the Nathan's hot dog eating contest?

JANUS: Correct, yeah, in 2008 I did, yeah.

GLENN: Now see, I don't get me wrong because we're number three. So 3's a great place.

JANUS: Oh, nice, all right.

GLENN: But I mean, I'm not eating. You know what I mean?

JANUS: Right.

GLENN: When you're eating and you fail to, you know you're kind of a mid pack kind of guy. Is it kind of like you know what I'm saying?

JANUS: Am I disappointed? Is that what you're implying? Should I be or

GLENN: Well, depressed?

JANUS: You know, I'm pretty happy with it. Something where I've worked pretty hard the last four years. And every year I'm getting better. So, you know, I've been doing Nathan's, the Nathan's hot dog contest for four years now. The first year I finished ninth, the second year fifth, the third year fourth, this past year's third. So I think, you know, I don't know what your trend is in the ratings but certainly

GLENN: No, we just hover at 3.

JANUS: You do? Okay.

GLENN: We might even slip down to 4 or 5 once in a while.

JANUS: Just get back on track.

GLENN: Okay. So do you have any advice for Dan? He needs to consume another, what is it, 4,000 calories?

DAN: Well, this is the question. What do you want me to get I mean, I know what your answer's going to be but the news story says that Phelps eats 10,000 to 12,000. So I'm going to need about another 4300 and change here in calories for the next three hours.

GLENN: So do you have any recommendations, Tim, for Dan to eat another 4700 calories?

JANUS: Yeah. I mean, you know, one thing I was thinking just when I was on hold is maybe you know, I'm not sure what he's doing for exercise to burn those calories off but if he is just kind of sitting there sedentary, it's going to be tough, you know. He is not going to have quite the need for calories, his digestion's going to slow down. So if he can get active, do something like Michael Phelps does, maybe not go swimming but take a long bath, that might help him.

DAN: A long bath in I'm into that. That sounds good.

GLENN: It's disturbing now me picturing Dan sitting in a studio there in a tub.

STU: Glenn, no one asked you to picture him in a tub. That's what you

GLENN: Well, I'm an overachiever. I'm an overachiever. However, when I did imagine him in the tub, I also imagine him in the tub with all of that electrical equipment and so it does have a happy ending.

DAN: Yes.

GLENN: All right. So Eater X, is there anything that because he was going for jam over, you know, maple syrup yesterday.

JANUS: Yeah, go for the high calorie stuff. You know, I'm a big maple syrup fan. I'll drink the stuff plain. If there are no stipulations as to sort of, you know, how he gets the calories down, what kinds of things he eats, then just go for the calorie dense. Go for a quarter maple syrup. It won't kill you.

GLENN: Quart of maple syrup? It won't kill you.

JANUS: It's got to have a couple of thousand calories. There's a ton of calories in maple syrup. So go for that or go for one of those weight gainer shakes.

DAN: That's what I'm thinking. I've already got them going down to get a couple of protein bars, I can eat a couple of those. I can easily get a few of those down. Becky say we have a maple syrup jug.

JANUS: It's delicious, yeah. But no, I think you've got to look at Phelps and what he's doing. Honestly that guy eating 12,000 calories a day, as envy us as I am of him, I'm sure he gets tired of it and he's got to be trying to find ways to, you know, sort of cram the calories in quicker. So I'm sure he would be going for the calorie rich foods, too.

GLENN: How can you be a professional eater and say you are tired of eating? If I could eat all day long, I would eat all day long. I love eating. It's one of my favorite

JANUS: I would, too.

GLENN: What?

JANUS: I think I would, too. But at some point it becomes like a job. Everything that you do that you're forced to do.

GLENN: That's because you got into it eating professionally, that's taking all the fun out of it. I mean, you go into it professionally, then it is like a job. It's like are you married?

JANUS: No, I'm not.

GLENN: Have you ever you know, if you ever get married and your wife is like, "I want to have a baby," it becomes a job and it's not fun anymore. You know what I'm saying?

JANUS: Right, right.

GLENN: So it's kind of like your food looks at you like, come on, make love to me and it's no longer any you're like, nah, you want my food to kind of want me to not eat it because then it makes it better.

JANUS: Right.

STU: Wonderful analogies here, Glenn. Really you are on the top of your game. This is why we're trending down.

GLENN: This is why we're trending down.

STU: How many calories if you do one of these contests, Tim, because you have the Crystal hamburger one coming up?

JANUS: Yeah, we do on ESPN, Crystal hamburgers, a chain down South.

STU: How many calories do you do when you do one of those contests?

JANUS: Last year Joey Chestnut, I think he ate 103 Crystal hamburgers in eight minutes and that worked out to about 15,000 calories.

DAN: Oh, my gosh.

GLENN: Hello, Dan.

DAN: That is inspiring. That is inspiring.

GLENN: At what point, Eater X, did you decide, I want to be a professional eater? I mean, how do you get started?

JANUS: You know, initially I was just looking for a way to impress Jodie Foster and couldn't think of anything. But that should be like something different, you know. She's a tough girl to impress.

GLENN: Sure, sure.

JANUS: But, you know, I love food, love flavor. I've always had a good tolerance for discomfort in life in general and I was kind of vaguely aware of this competitive eating circuit and I thought that those three characteristics might make me a champion. So, you know, kind of on a whim looking for a day off and looking for something fun and different to do, I signed up for a local contest in New York City and I had a great time, did okay and left there thinking that I could do better and that I could have more fun. So I just kind of kept going and it went from there.

GLENN: How much money have you taken in?

JANUS: Each year, you know, it always changes. But, you know, it's 20, 25,000 extra. So it's

GLENN: Wait, wait, 20 to 25,000?

JANUS: Yeah.

GLENN: Really?

STU: He's one of the top three in the world, Glenn.

GLENN: How many people are in your field?

JANUS: I don't know. I mean, you know, we have several thousand on the roster, guys that go out there and sign up with major league eating events. We have several hundred people there all the time.

GLENN: Did your mom or your dad ever say, come on, honey, get a real job?

JANUS: There was something, there was kind of a Bell curve of acceptance with them. It started off, you know, they were very happy for me and they thought, great thing for a son to be having fun with. And then the deeper involved that I got, I think they were starting to worry about me. It was really only, you know, until they sort of saw the tangential benefits starting to accrue, they saw me going places, meeting cool people, doing things I wouldn't do normally, you know, being on the Glenn Beck show.

GLENN: This is a high point for your parents.

JANUS: Yeah, right. They just started to kind of come around again and they did: Well, you know, maybe this isn't such a waste of time. So it's fun for them now. They will be down, we have a contest this weekend in Connecticut at the eating pork ribs and they can come by, they can watch me and see me and have fun for a few hours.

GLENN: Let me ask you this because this is what I thought of, Michael Phelps, because all guys are like this. All guys, when we're growing up, we can eat a ton. And then all of a sudden we hit 30 and we're like, wait a minute, I can't eat as much. And that's why we get so fat so fast because I think we're just, we've trained ourselves to eat that much. When Michael Phelps decides, "Oh, enough of this swimming thing," this guy's going to be as big as a house, we're going to take him out, his skin's going to grow into his couch, isn't it?

JANUS: He is so lucky, I think you are partly right because the only reason I used to eat a ton of food and what happened was I began to realize is my metabolism was flowing if I didn't change the way I thought about food and I just kept going out there and eating the way I used to eat that I would become a big guy and so you know, I've kind of had to trick myself into believing that, you know, eating too much and feeling full outside of a contest is not a good healthy thing to do. So, yeah

GLENN: How do you wait, how do you stretch your stomach out and then bring it back in? I mean, aren't you starving after a contest or after, you know you've prepared yourself and then

JANUS: It's kind of one of the misconceptions, though, is that, you know, my stomach it can stretch and it will if I need it to. So I have the ability sort of thumbing that from it. But, you know, at rest it's the same size as anybody else's. So if I put food into it, it fills up, you know, to a point where it needs to stretch. It fills up just like anybody else's does and I'll feel full but, you know, if I want to keep eating, if I have to keep eating, if we're doing the Crystal square off, you know, and I need to eat more hamburgers, I know that it can handle that and it can stretch further. So I don't actually, you know, feel full any later than you would, but I do have the ability to kind of keep going and I know I have it. So

GLENN: Let me ask you a question.

JANUS: Yeah.

GLENN: My perception is the Japanese are the best at it and they are good at three things. They are good at math, they are good at building robots, and eating hot dogs. Is that true?

JANUS: They are very good at it, but I think Americans have closed the gap at this point. You know, the hot dog champion the last two years is an American from California, you know.

GLENN: How are they even competitive? How is anybody on this planet competitive with America?

JANUS: Well, it's tough. Once we put our minds to it, you know, we do have a great, you know, talent pool in this country and we've sort of uncovered that now. As competitive eating got really big, you know, Americans came out of the woodwork and realizing, you know, that they could do it and they began to challenge and they began to win. And there's only one Japanese competitor at the Fourth of July now because really only one of them maybe, you know, is good enough to truly challenge at this point.

GLENN: Eater X, thank you very much, I appreciate it, Tim Janus.

JANUS: You're welcome.

GLENN: Dan, send somebody for maple syrup. I think there has to be a maple syrup jug off.

DAN: I'll give it a shot now. I'm inspired now. I'm ready to go. Beck by the way, is that not what I've been saying here? Everybody's like, oh, Glenn, you are down in the mouth, you are worried about everything else. I've told you a million times, only when the United States is down on the map, that's when we hit it.

STU: So you are saying our geopolitical situation is similar to competitive eating?

GLENN: Exactly right.

There are new curriculum standards being implemented into schools throughout the nation for health classes that not only go far beyond what's appropriate for young children, but are entrenched in clear political biases, too. Under the standards, third-graders are taught about hormone blockers and endless gender identities, and topics get shockingly graphic for kids as young as 11. Some schools are even teaching their teachers and kids to ignore what parents have to say about these topics. And the worst part may be that many parents are completely unaware what their children are being taught.

Tina Descovich, co-founder of Moms for Liberty, joined "The Glenn Beck Program" to explain exactly what you can ask at your next school board meeting to ensure this "horrifying" curriculum isn't being taught in your kid's school.

Watch the video clip below:

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It should come as no surprise that a newsworthy story receives more media coverage when released on a Monday than a Friday. The reason is in part due to a large number of news-consuming Americans checking out for the week to focus on their weekend plans rather than the news.

On Monday's radio program, Glenn Beck shared information that President Joe Biden decided to release on Friday — when fewer people would notice — regarding the Climate Finance report. This report is marketed to Americans as "A Roadmap To Build a Climate-Resilient Economy." But Glenn believes the report to be Biden's Great Reset warning shot to banks.

In this clip, Glenn warned that if Americans don't stand together, in eight years we all indeed will own nothing. Watch the clip for the full story. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.



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On today's radio program, Glenn Beck was joined by Bill O'Reilly to discuss the top stories of the week.

For O'Reilly, the biggest story this week centered around someone mysteriously missing from mainstream media news reports today: Mark Zuckerberg. Specifically, O'Reilly said it's the 'scandalous' way the Facebook CEO spent nearly $420 million to influence the 2020 election — and did so successfully.

Watch the clip to hear the full conversation. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

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On Thursday's radio program, Grace Smith and her father, Andy, joined Glenn Beck on the phone and provided a first-hand account of Grace's refusal to wear a mask at school.

Smith, 16, began a maskless protest after her school district in Laramie, Wyoming, decided to implement a mask mandate. As a result, Grace received three suspensions, was issued two $500-citations, and was eventually arrested.

"How long were you in jail?" Glenn asked.

Grace said was taken to jail but was never booked nor was she was placed in a jail cell.

Glenn commended Grace's father, Andy, for raising such a "great citizen" and asked if it was Grace's idea to protest. Andy said it was Grace's idea, explaining that they took the position of arguing on the grounds of civil rights rather than the efficacy of wearing a mask.

Grace has since withdrawn from public school and started a home school program. She also told Glenn that she will continue to fight the school district, legally.

You can donate to Grace's legal fund here.

To hear more from this conversation click here.

Disclaimer: The content of this clip does not provide medical advice. Please seek the advice of local health officials for any COVID-19 and/or COVID vaccine related questions & concerns.

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