Glenn Beck: Climbing for Seals


-- Michael's Everest Challenge site

-- Find out more about the Warrior Fund

GLENN: 888-727-BECK, 888-727-BECK. Last night I had a dinner with a good friend of mine, Marcus Luttrell, Navy SEAL, part of Seal Team 8 that -- or is it Seal Team 10, Stu?

DAN: 10.

GLENN: Yeah, Seal Team 10. His brother I think is an 8. And he wrote the book The Lone Survivor which if you haven't read, it's just a remarkable story. These SEALs are amazing. We were having dinner and he was telling me, "Oh, yeah, I jumped out of a plane at 29,000 feet and I did this and, you know, you only pull your parachute when you're doing that high altitude, you only pull your parachute about 800 feet from the ground." I'm thinking to myself, I'd be dead. There's just no way I would do any of these -- he's talking about big picked up by the submarine, you throw this band around it. It's just bizarre what these people do and they do it all the time. All the time the SEALs are out. Another good friend of mine, Michael Kobold is in the studio. How are you?

KOBOLD: Hi, Glenn, how are you?

GLENN: You're a watchmaker. In case anybody doesn't know, Kobold watches, I wear Kobold watches. They are the only ones -- are you completely made now in America?

KOBOLD: No, not completely but close to 89% by value.

GLENN: This is -- and so many people don't know this. We stopped making watches a long time ago and Michael is a German who came over here and now is working over here and living over here, and are you an American yet?

KOBOLD: I'm not American. I'm here on a Visa. I'm German.

GLENN: All right. So -- but he's making watches, bringing them back here to America, makes them in Pittsburgh and they're great watches. In fact, the 24 watch which I have which is the one that was made for Kiefer Sutherland for the TV show 24 is the one I wear.

KOBOLD: That's right.

GLENN: And the SEALs wear his watches and everything else, great watches. Anyway, you are raising funds for the Navy SEALs?

KOBOLD: Yeah, in a roundabout way. So most people set up, you know, bake sales and lemonade stands, but the SEALs need a lot of money and this is not for the SEALs directly. It's for the Navy SEALs' families. If they get wounded or injured when killed in action, their families are taken care of by a fund called the Navy SEAL warrior fund. Which is a private institution and they raise money for these guys so that their families are taken care of when they can't take care of them anymore.

GLENN: And how are you raising money?

KOBOLD: Well, I'm climbing Mt. Everest in April and in May from Will Cross from Pittsburgh.

GLENN: Oh, in April and in May. We're just going to miss each other.

KOBOLD: Yeah, it's going to be a little bit tough. It's two months on the cold icy mountain there and with the worst food in the world.

GLENN: So again how are you raising money? I mean, that's cool that you're climbing Mt. Everest. What are you doing?

KOBOLD: Well, the way this all came about is I climb Mt. Everest with friends last year but I didn't get very far and, of course, Sir Ranulph Fiennes is the world's greatest living explorer. I had a week to prepare for this. I went up and I injured myself. I sliced my hand open. So I wasn't allowed to climb anymore. And then I support the Navy SEALs by various ways, we give watches away, we raffle them off and we auction them off. At one of these events a Navy SEAL commander, commander from Seal Team 10 said how far did you get up Everest? I said, not very far, 20,000 feet. He said, that's not quite the summit, son. And so I said, you know what, I'm going to try it again and this time I'll prepare. I'll take more than seven days to do it. I'll take, you know, three or four months. And if I get to the summit, you know, I'll raise the Navy SEAL flag. And then I thought, well, why not raise money for the SEALs that way, for the warrior fund. And so the Navy said, fine, we'll get a couple of SEALs together to train you. So I've been training on their base in Coronado Island in California for the last three weeks.

GLENN: That's insanity.

KOBOLD: Yeah.

GLENN: That's insanity. Most guys are -- have you cried yet?

KOBOLD: Close to it. They chased me up the seven story high thing called a cargo net and I'm relatively scared of heights and I --

GLENN: Oh, so you're going to climb Mt. Everest and you're afraid of heights.

KOBOLD: Yes. I didn't --

GLENN: What the hell is wrong with you? 20,000 feet and you still, you have like bubbles in your head still? What are you thinking, Michael?

KOBOLD: Well, it's not that scary on the mountain. The scariest part is crossing these ice ladders through the consume boom ice pool which is --

GLENN: Oh, I hate that part, the Khumbu ice fault. I hate that. That's the worst part of it.

KOBOLD: That is.

GLENN: I think anybody you talk to says the mountain's not that bad, but the Khumbu ice fault. What exactly, what is an ice ladder?

KOBOLD: Well, it's basically just your regular stepladder and except for that it's tied together to two or three more stepladders by just a couple of strings and then you lay that across this huge crevasse and you cross the crevasse by climbing over the ice ladders. And you can do this on your hands and knees or you can do it by just walking over it with your crampons attached to your boots and you fall --

GLENN: Your crap-ons?

KOBOLD: Crampons, crampons. They are these metal things to attach to your boots to make sure you can walk on ice.

GLENN: Oh, I thought it was for when you crapped on ice.

KOBOLD: In fact, when you go to the summit, you wear diapers, a lot of guys wear diapers because you are climbing for, you know, 12 to 18 hours straight.

GLENN: Yeah, I could hold it for 12 to 18 hours, but I don't, I don't think I would because how far is the fall if you fall through the ladder, the ice ladder?

KOBOLD: It depends. I mean, it could be as little as 30 feet and as much as 100, 150 feet. But there is a line that you can hold onto. It's just for how long. That's the problem. So they are teaching me on Coronado how to hold onto all sorts of things and one of the ways is to lock your arms, that way you are not straining your muscles.

GLENN: Are you going back to Coronado to train with the SEALs?

KOBOLD: I am indeed. I'm flying out on Friday.

GLENN: Good, because I know we have a lot of SEAL listeners to the program there in the San Diego area.

KOBOLD: Yes.

GLENN: Make Michael cry like a little girl. Make him cry. (Laughing). All right. So if somebody wants to get involved, I mean, how are you raising money?

KOBOLD: Well, we've set up a website. There is the official Navy SEAL warrior fund website which you can Google, look up online, and you can make donations straight to them. And we have a website that tracks my progress and my expedition's progress which is www.Everest-challenge.com, and it's pretty cool. We'll have live updates from the mountain as we climb up and Sir Ranulph Fiennes is coming with us this time with a BBC camera to film us doing this.

GLENN: You have to call us when you get to the very top. You have to call.

KOBOLD: Absolutely, I will.

GLENN: We'll get you the phone number. Call us on your satellite phone.

KOBOLD: I can't agree we'll have such a clear connection as in the studio.

GLENN: Well, there's already -- you won't give a flying crap. You'll just be like, "Help, help." You know, the worst part I would imagine climbing Everest is then you get up to the top and you're like, oh, crap, now I've got to go all the way down.

KOBOLD: Yeah, that's the hardest part because you get elated and you get excited that you've made it to the summit and now you've got to go all the way back down to safety because most people when they die, they usually die on the way back.

GLENN: Have you thought about bringing a sled?

KOBOLD: No such luck.

GLENN: Michael Kobold, thank you very much. We'll talk to you again. Next time I talk to you, we'll talk to you I guess from Everest.

KOBOLD: Sounds good. Thanks for having me, Glenn.

GLENN: You bet. We'll have all the information, we'll send it in the free e-mail newsletter today. You can sign up for that at GlennBeck.com, free e-mail newsletter today, help the Navy SEAL.

Glenn gives the latest coronavirus numbers, updating YOU on everything needed to know as Americans and officials monitor China's new COVID-19 virus:

Daily Stats as of 5:30 AM CT (from John's Hopkins)

  • Total Confirmed Cases Worldwide: 799,995 (up from 735,135 Yesterday)
  • Total Confirmed Deaths Worldwide: 38,735 (up from 34,807 Yesterday)
  • Total Confirmed Recovered Worldwide: 169,995 (up from 155,950 Yesterday)
  • 5% of Active Cases are considered serious (requiring hospitalization) Steady from 5% Yesterday, but down from 19% high back in February
  • Note that 11% of US Confirmed Cases require Hospitalization, roughly on par with Italy at 12% requiring hospitalization
  • US has 164,359 Confirmed Cases and 3,173 Deaths, up from 142,746 cases and 2,489 deaths Yesterday
  • The United States of America now leads the world in total confirmed cases, with 63,000 more cases than Italy (although Italy leads the world in Deaths with 11,591 officially dead)
  • US has 3,173 Dead vs 5,507 Recovered and 3,512 in Critical Condition
  • The US Currently has 155,679 Active Cases of COVID-19, with less than 0.6% of the total US population tested
  • 15% of Americans who have been tested have been diagnosed with COVID-19
The Moment of Trump's Conversion: Dr Anthony Fauci Takes Full Responsibility https://dailycaller.com/2020/03/30/anthony-fauci-moment-donald-trump-realized-extend-social-distancing-mandate/
  • Dr Anthony Fauci, the Chief Medical Advisor to the coronavirus task force, explained on CNN that Trump listened and "got it right away" after being shown new data projecting as many as 3 Million deaths in the US if COVID-19 mitigation policies were lifted.
  • Fauci also said Trump's "first goal is to prevent suffering and death" and this was part of the reason why he knew the COVID-19 guidelines should be extended.
  • "You know, interestingly, we showed him the data, he looked at the data and he got it right away, it was a pretty clear picture," according to Fauci.
  • "Dr. Debbie Birx and I went in together and leaned over his desk and said 'Here is the data, take a look.'
  • Trump reportedly looked at them, understood the implications and he shook his head and said 'I guess we got to do it.'
  • "Medically, this is the right decision, and I stand behind it 100%," Fauci said.
  • "From a public health standpoint, we felt strongly that it would have been the wrong decision to pull back," Fauci said. "I mean, we are scientists, physicians, public health officials. We're not economists. We're sensitive to the idea that the economy could suffer, but weigh that against tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of American lives."
  • "...it was patently obvious looking at the data that at the end of the day if we try to push back prematurely, not only would we lose lives, but it probably would hurt the economy as well. So you would lose on double accounts. So, to us, there was no question what the right choice was."
Washington DC, Virginia, Maryland Join States Issuing House Arrest Orders https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/30/coronavirus-violators-of-marylands-stay-at-home-order-face-criminal-charges.html
  • Maryland and Virginia became the latest states on Monday to enact "stay-at-home" mandates amid the coronavirus outbreak, except for essential travel for work.
  • Virginia's order is in effect until June 10, making it one of the longest statewide mandates implemented so far.
  • Maryland's penalties for violating its order are among some of the strictest in the country, including a $1000 fine, and up to 30 days jail time for repeat offenders.
  • In total, more than 210 Million Americans now effectively live under some form of House Arrest or Shelter In Place type orders, with another, 50 Million facing travel or shopping/eating restrictions.
  • Only 6 states have not closed schools.