Glenn Beck: America's Prophet



America's Prophet

FEILER: I'm wonderful, Glenn, and thank you for your very kind words and for your wisdom and your support. It means a lot. Thank you very much.

GLENN: I have ‑‑ my daughters, when they were young, they used to go to school, and I'd pick them up every day and I'd say, what did you learn today? And they would talk about whatever, and I could never talk about math. And I'd be like, whatever. And then they would ‑‑ and I would ask them, what did you learn in history? And they would tell me. And they were always bored with it. And I would say, well, let me tell you the story. And I would tell them the story. And they grew up. Both of them are studying history. And they are ‑‑ they both adopted my philosophy of, you are just, you are not a good storyteller. If you are bored by history, it's because somebody's not a good storyteller. This is the best storytelling of history I think I've ever read. I mean, do you consider this a history book?

FEILER: I consider myself a storyteller. Let's start with that.

GLENN: Okay.

FEILER: What I've tried to do my entire life is go out and tell stories. And I grew up in Savannah, Georgia, five generations. I have lived a life where I've gone out, entered different worlds, kind of followed questions that I had in my mind and set out to answer them. So I had spent, before working on this book, a decade retracing the Bible through the Middle East or walking the Bible, Abraham in a show I hosted on PBS called walking the Bible, and I just stumbled onto this story. I was spending more time at home. You mentioned your daughters. My wife had given birth to identical twins and we started traveling. I went to Plymouth as you mentioned and I ‑‑

GLENN: Tell this story first before you leave, stop here at Plymouth for a second. Tell the story of the first Sabbath on these shores.

FEILER: It's not, it's a story that is ‑‑ I never heard this story.

GLENN: Never heard it?

FEILER: So I go to Plymouth and I get on a boat and we sail on Plymouth harbor to this little tiny island that you cannot go to, that is inaccessible, that is in Plymouth harbor. And that is the island essentially where America began. So the pilgrims, they are living in England and they go to Holland. They sail, and you talk about Moses. They are feeling oppressed, right? So what do they do? They cross a tumultuous see, they go to an undeveloped wilderness, they set out to create a new promised land. The Bibles that they carried on the Mayflower were emblazoned with that picture of Moses. And the first thing they do when they get to Cape Cod is get down on their knees and thank God for allowing them to cross the Red Sea. But they know they can't live out in province at the very end of Cape Cod. They are hungry, they are out of hope, they are out of food, they have nowhere to go. They send out a small expeditionary force of 20 of these pilgrims and some of the men on this boat, and it crashes. Because you've got a bad stormy night and they're fleeing, the Indians were out there. They crash and they ‑‑ basically the oars break, everything. And they end up on this little tiny island. And they dry their oars, they get off on the island and they wake up the next morning and they realize that it is the Sabbath. And they are not going to travel on the Sabbath. They are deep, deep into the Old Testament and so they spend a day fleeing for their lives, resting and paying tribute to God. And they have service and they take a day off and they rest. And then they go into Plymouth harbor.

GLENN: You know, it's interesting because there's always the argument of, you know, is this a Christian nation, is this, what is this. You know, the answer that you come away with in reading, you know, the words of the founders is you can say that they all had a different view of Christianity or whatever, but they were deeply God‑fearing people. They're this ‑‑ that the idea of the Old Testament, this was real to them.

FEILER: That's such an important point, Glenn, because they didn't have the distance now that we all have now. Archeology, history, all these things that weren't even invented yet. So they didn't know this distance to the text. To them it was real. And what it was most of all, it was a precedent. It was an example that somebody else had been oppressed. Why is this story of Moses so important? It is fundamental, you can be in a difficult place, you can in a challenging place, a dark and dim place and you can imagine that there is a better world. And that for the pilgrims for the founding fathers, for generations and generations of Americans.

GLENN: For us.

FEILER: And today the reason for us ‑‑ I've written for twelve years books about the Bible but I have not written one that so resonates with the moment as America's Prophet does because we are once more in will challenging times.

GLENN: Oh, my gosh. We are chaining, we have the chains ‑‑ you know, I have to tell you there's ‑‑ every chapter of this I love. But the chapter on the Statue of Liberty, knowing, you know, I've read a million times the chains. But it never came to life to me. The tablets that she holds. Explain just a little bit of the symbology of the Statue of Liberty.

FEILER: It grew out of the assassination of Lincoln which I personally had not known and American lovers in France wanted to pay tribute to the assassinated president and to the American journey of freedom by building a Statue of Liberty. So Frédéric Bartholdi, the sculptor used the Roman goddess of freedom but adopted two symbols from Moses, the spikes of light around her head and the tablet in her arms, both of which comes from the moment Moses climbs down Mt. Sinai with the law, with the Ten Commandments. So 250 years after the pilgrims sailed into Plymouth harbor comparing their journey to Moses, new immigrants including many of the people in this studio where we're sitting now, the ancestors of these people floated into New York harbor and looked up, saw this nimbus of light, the outstretched arm and it forever secured America's place as the new promised land because that's what it is, Glenn. It's a sense of hope in a difficult place. And that's what's going on today.

GLENN: I also ‑‑ and correct me if I'm wrong because maybe I have this wrong. But I also have the ‑‑ walked away having the distinct impression that there was something else going on with the Statue of Liberty, that it was a gift but it was also a dual gift almost to themselves over in France because they were trying to hold us up. Explain this part.

FEILER: Well, because the French essentially ‑‑ what was going on was a battle in France at the time between what was going to be the future of France and it was basically the Democrats, if you will, the people who were interested in Republican democracy in France who wanted to tell to the French that they could have an alternative to the king and imperial authorities. So it was a way of saying we're going to make this connection and thereby inspire the French and simultaneously inspire the Americans. And to me what I love about the statue, and it's not far from where I live in Brooklyn today, is that it is poised forever on the promised land. So that when Ronald Reagan, in 1986 on the 100th anniversary of the statue, goes there and gives this gorgeous speech in which he links America from the pilgrims all the way up to today and says I have always believed that God somehow placed this country here as a symbol of freedom. People came from all over the world and it embodied the idea of a new promised land. And it's one of the most beautiful speeches Reagan ever gave. And he links the stories going all the way back to the pilgrims, all the way back to the founding fathers as you have done here today all the way back to the Statue of Liberty. The great icons of America, Statue of Liberty, the Liberty Bell with the quote from Moses, the pilgrims inspired by Moses, the founding fathers wanting Moses on the seal, all the way through. You cannot separate biblical values from American values.

GLENN: The Supreme Court even looks at Moses as they are sitting at the bench, if they look up, if I'm not mistaken, at the painting of all the great law‑givers, but Moses is their central figure.

FEILER: Six representations of Moses on the Supreme Court, in the chambers, on the frieze, in the chamber, and there's a great story about it that's actually not even in my book. There are two tablets, right? And the tablet that's showing in the painting in the Supreme Court chamber is the one that says don't murder, don't steal, don't commit adultery. But the Hebrew word for lo which is the no is covered up. So the actual painting says "Steal, murder, and disrespect your parents."

GLENN: The name of the book is America's Prophet.

I want to go back to the Statue of Liberty again and I want to see if I have captured in my own head the point of what you were trying to, one of the ‑‑ I think it was a more subtle point in what you were trying to make. You tell the story about the woman who wrote the famous poem.

FEILER: Emma Lazarus.

GLENN: Tell that story real quick.

FEILER: She was a Jew living in New York in great splendor and she wasn't particularly adapted to the Jews, but when the Jews starting coming over oppressed in Russia, she kind of had a reconnection to them and she wrote this poem, it was a fundraising thing that didn't really work and it wasn't until a generation later that it kind of went on kind of retroactively linking the plight of the Statue of Liberty to the immigrants.

GLENN: So what I see is that the French wanted to salute us but also we're trying to say, look, everything is destroyed. I mean, this old stuff, it doesn't work anymore, right?

FEILER: Yes, yes.

GLENN: So we've always read this poem as, Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest‑tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door.

I've always read it in my head like that. After I read your book, may I reinterpret and tell me if I have it right, that it is a ‑‑ it should be read like this, because it is not a message necessarily to the poor as much as it is a message to the old world.

FEILER: Absolutely.

GLENN: Where it should be read like this:


Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,


With conquering limbs astride from land to land;


Here at our sea‑washed, sunset gates shall stand


A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame


Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name


Mother of Exiles. From her beacon‑hand


Glows world‑wide welcome; her mild eyes command


The air‑bridged harbor that twin cities frame.


"Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" Cries she


With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,


Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,


The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.


Send these, the homeless, tempest‑tost to me,


I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

Shouldn't it be read more like that? It was, you send me your rejects and they will succeed here. They will be free and everything can be done. It wasn't, it wasn't so much pity on them as much as it was you are enslaving. I can take the dread, the people you reject and they will be kings here.

FEILER: Not ‑‑ but not that, not the old, not the storied pomp. I mean, is there any more word that captures the kind of heraldry of the kings and queens? Not, not, not. But, but, but. But hope. But light. But opportunity. And now I'll read back to you if we might what Ronald Reagan said 100 years later when he stood there and he said, I have always believed there was some divine providence that placed this great land here between the two great oceans to be found by a special kind of people from every corner of the world who had a special love for freedom and a special courage that enabled them to leave their own land, leave their friends and their country men and come to this new and strange land to build a new world of peace and freedom and hope. That's the essential idea of the Moses story. Not but. You can leave the slavery of the past. You can leave the horrific. And Egypt was the superpower at the time. And you can go plunge through those waters, persevere through the dryness and set out to create a new promised land. It's a land of hope. It is a narrative of hope. It offers people the opportunity themselves to create a better world. As Shimon Peres once said to me, the Egyptians build pyramids, the Israelites build stories. And that's it. America has always been based on an idea and has been based on a spiritual connection between these people and God. And you cannot separate America from these biblical values, which is often what happens today.

GLENN: The name of the book is America's Prophet. If you buy ‑‑ and I've got four out this year. If you can only buy one book, buy a second one and make it America's ‑‑ no, buy this book, America's Prophet. It is absolutely fantastic. And I have to tell you, Bruce, you made me want to leave what I do for a living and go write history books because I was in the bell tower with the Liberty Bell. I was at Plymouth rock with you. I was in the Statue of Liberty with you. It is a fantastic book. I cannot recommend it high enough. Thank you.

FEILER: My pleasure. Thank you very much.

First comes the "crisis," then comes the expansion. The federal government is seizing on the January 6 Capitol riot to take carte blanche to do whatever it wants and weaponize the event to further empower the new overlords of our country — the intelligence community.

On Glenn TV Wednesday, Glenn Beck reveals what's happening with the U.S. Capitol Police and argues they've morphed into a new arm of the intelligence apparatus, boosted by a massive increase in funding and surveillance equipment and new offices OUTSIDE the Capitol building. The Biden administration has also hidden basic details regarding January 6. Why did officials refuse to release the name of the officer who killed Ashli Babbitt? Where are the 14,000-plus hours of CCTV footage? As any intelligence organization knows, it's best to operate outside the realms of oversight.

Glenn exposes the hidden hand of government that could be used to punish and destroy innocent Americans who are only guilty of holding the "wrong" political view.

Watch the full episode of "Glenn TV" below:

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The conditions in Afghanistan under the Taliban rule — for Americans, allies, Christians, women and more — continue to deteriorate, and the people there continue to plead that we will not forget them. On the radio program Monday, Glenn Beck gave an emotional update on current evacuation efforts, including the tragic story of one girl — an American passport holder — who was not rescued in time.

"I have a pit in my stomach like I haven't had in a while. What is happening in Afghanistan is both miraculous and horrendous," Glenn began. "What's going on right now one of the most amazing things I've ever personally witnessed — the evacuation of Americans, those [Afghans] who helped us, Christians that are dying, women that are under incredible conditions. I see things that I can't show you. I see the pleadings from people who are in safe houses, 'Please, don't forget us.' I see what they're being sent by the Taliban.

"If I die today, my entire life will have been worth it for what you have helped get done, in just the last three weeks. You have saved well over 5,000 people," he continued.

Fighting back tears, Glenn added, "I ask that you pray for those in the Middle East, that are in the midst of doing work, that a Moses-style miracle will happen. ... There are several people that are in dire need of medical care. Friday, we told you — along with the congressman from Oklahoma [Rep. Markwayne Mullin] who had just returned — [about] a father and two daughters that were blue passport Americans, and a mother who had a permanent residence, a Green Card. The daughter was very ill. And they thought, that if we couldn't get her out of there, that she would lose her legs. I got a call on Saturday morning, that we were too late, that she didn't lose her legs. She lost her life, waiting. There are now two Americans, instead of three."

Glenn showered his audience with gratitude, repeating that "well over 5000" lives have already been saved because of their incredible generosity, but lamented that there are still thousands more people yet to be saved.

Watch the video clip below to hear more updates from Glenn:

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To donate to these rescue efforts, visit NazareneFund.org or MercuryOne.org.

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To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

Megyn Kelly pulled her sons out of the private elementary school they attended after she learned that the boys were asked "weekly" if they were still sure they were boys. But that's not all that this "experimental transgender education program" taught.

Megyn joined Glenn Beck on the radio program to tell the story, which she thought had ended when the school apologized, and to talk about what's next for America as our leaders refuse to promote actual psychological support for our kids and instead "parade" transgenderism as the solution to their problems.

"When [my son] was in third grade, I found out they unleashed a three-week experimental transgender education program on these boys, with really inappropriate videos. The kids were confused. These are 8- and 9-year-olds, Glenn. They have no idea what the school is even talking about with the trans thing. They got really in-depth, with really in-your-face videos — and then parents complained. And the school did something it hasn't done in its 400-year history, which was they apologized. Even they realized they had done wrong," Megyn explained.

"But, then I said to my son a year later, so did they ever round back to the trans thing? Like, whatever happened with it? And he said ... they bring it up every week. ... [They ask] how many people here still feel confident that they're a boy? Do you still feel sure you're a boy?" she continued. "This is not support. This is not nonbullying. This is indoctrination. And it's deeply confusing to the children, and wrong."

Megyn went on to give examples of how she's seen trans ideology turn "support, nonbullying, kindness, friendship, allyship, on its head."

"The absolute surrender of the medical community to this insanity is a scourge on this nation. It's disgusting what is happening with our doctors," she added. "There are people who are legitimately transgender, or who have gender dysphoria. And for those people, we should be supportive and they should get the care that they need. But what we've done instead, is taken everyone who expresses any kind of gender confusion and said, you're trans. You're trans. And we have our psychiatrists doing this."

"It's crazy," Megyn asserted. "The fact that we're doing this so willy-nilly in the name of allyship and support, it's abusive. It's criminal."

Watch the video clip below to catch more of the conversation:

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.