Glenn's interview with Curt and Shonda Schilling



The Best Kind of Different: Our Family's Journey with Asperger's Syndrome


by Shonda & Curt Schilling

GLENN: So, a couple of weeks ago, somebody comes into my office and said, Shonda Schilling has written a book and that's Curt Schilling's wife. And I said, Who the hell is Curt Schilling? And I said, Wait a minute. Isn't he the Yankee?

PAT: Fan.

GLENN: Wasn't he the Yankee that was voting for what's her face?

PAT: Martha Coakley.

GLENN: That's what it was. And so you know how they have we have Curt and Shonda Schilling in the studio with us and everybody else, everybody else that you do an interview with really wants you to, you know, do the interview and be, oh, yeah. Shonda, I'm here. This is how the book was sold to me. This is a story about a parent and a dad who's active and out and gone and the mom going, help! And everybody giving the wrong advice on what to do with kids and, you know, Dad has ADHD and you were the one who really kind of had to fight and track this down and find out what was going on with your kids. So, well come. I'm glad you're here.

SHONDA SCHILLING: Thank you.

CURT SCHILLING: Thank you.

GLENN: Curt, I'm glad you're here, too.

CURT SCHILLING: Hey, anybody that's been criticized by Whoopi Goldberg and Keith Olberman and Rosie O'Donnell is a friend of ours.

GLENN: And what's his name? James Cameron is the latest. And, also, Curt, I will tell you this: I asked I only asked one question about you, because I really know nothing about sports, is he a man of honor? And it was a unanimous, Absolutely. I said, Great. Let's have him in.

CURT SCHILLING: Thank you.

GLENN: So, tell me about, tell me about what happened with you, because I have three boys, one daughter

SHONDA SCHILLING: Right.

GLENN: And things weren't going well.

SHONDA SCHILLING: No. It was all coming crashing down at once. He has ADD. So, you can imagine all four of my kids have ADHD. It is a very impulsive

GLENN: No. I can't relate.

SHONDA SCHILLING: house. Nobody sits still.

GLENN: It's five kids.

CURT SCHILLING: I'm No. 5.

GLENN: That's what my wife says about me. And I tell you, when I saw you have three boys boys, because I have three daughters and one son

SHONDA SCHILLING: Right.

GLENN: boys are just different alone.

SHONDA SCHILLING: Right.

GLENN: So, man alive, you had your hands full.

SHONDA SCHILLING: Well, and my daughter is second. Most people think he's last, you know, but she's and she was. She was a really different kind of ADHD, couldn't pay attention in school. And I just assumed that it was because she was too worried about her social life, but in this one particular spring, the year that we went to the World Series, I found out that daughter was ADHD, I was suspecting that he had an either disorder. My limits with Grant had role come to the forefront because he just really sensed something was different and in the middle of this, in the conferences with the classrooms, the I go to pick my littlest one up, who's starting kindergarten the next year and they said, do you know what? He's not ready for kindergarten and I was just blown out of the water. And so how we judge ourselves as parents, I have come to find out, is the total wrong way and that is how they achieve. And through this whole journey that I've been on, I found out that, you know, even though I don't have a six month write up and that I don't get a salary increase

GLENN: Yeah, yeah.

SHONDA SCHILLING: really the happiness of my kids is what's most important and I wasn't living that way.

GLENN: You were you were being told that you don't you've got it all wrong with you know, you're not disciplining enough.

SHONDA SCHILLING: Right.

GLENN: You're not being spank them or whatever. Right?

SHONDA SCHILLING: Right. I mean, I was writing it off that he was the middle child, he was the third child, he just had a quirky personality, but it was all the unwanted advice, that people could see me that I didn't have control and it wasn't control that he was

GLENN: Yeah. I understand.

SHONDA SCHILLING: spinning around and running into walls and stuff. It was just a constant battle with him

GLENN: And what did you finally find out?

SHONDA SCHILLING: I went in for the ADHD, which I was expecting and found out that he was on the spectrum of autism and he has Asperger's and I remember thinking, what does that mean, what does that mean? I was alone. He was on the road. And then walking out of that room and having your seven year old son sitting there and trying not to react again. You know, I couldn't react. I couldn't fall apart on him and then happened to fly to Chicago to tell Curt that it was autism.

GLENN: Curt, how did you feel as a dad? I mean, because I know I work all the time and I'm I mean, my wife is a miracle worker. Obviously yours is, too. She's dealing with the same thing with me with ADHD and working and gone all the time. It tore it tears me up all the time. How did you deal with it?

CURT SCHILLING: There was two initial reactions. The first one obviously is the immense guilt. I look back on how I raised my child. I'm a man. I'm the husband. Right? So, it's discipline. You know, do this, go there, be that. Well, just be a lot of the advice she was getting from me. At 11:30 at night when we would say good night and I love you, it's, Be stricter her, punish him, and that's not how you most children, especially with Asperger's. And the other one was, like everything else, when you're not presented a solution, you have to will stuff to happen. All right. Okay. All right. I get it. It's Asperger's. Now what? What do we? How do we fix this for him?



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GLENN: So, the most important thing that you learned, what's the most important thing you learned? What's the one thing people think of the book by the way, the name of the book is The Best Kind Of Different. You walk away. What is the one thing?

SHONDA SCHILLING: From the book?

GLENN: Yeah.

SHONDA SCHILLING: Is that I mean, really what I want I was trying to give Grant a voice, but what I really want is in society today, you never know what's going on in somebody's house and instead of that kid who's throwing a fit in the grocery aisle that we judge, you say offer a smile, because I sure could have used a smile a lot of times.

GLENN: You and I, we have a lot of common because that is exactly I walk by people. I know how I used to walk by people.

SHONDA SCHILLING: Yeah

GLENN: I walk by people now in the grocery store and I usually put my hand on their shoulder and I'll say, Stay strong. I'm with you.

SHONDA SCHILLING: Yeah.

GLENN: Do you know what I mean? And you can see the parent just almost break down because they're so embarrassed and they tonight know what to do

SHONDA SCHILLING: Right, right.

GLENN: And they're at their wit's end. I've got the tell you, I know people who have amazing families and who are amazing people and their family just burns to the ground?

CURT SCHILLING: Yeah.

GLENN: They've done everything they can.

CURT SCHILLING: The joy of life has to come from making your kids good people and not champions.

GLENN: The name of the book is the best kind of difference. Shonda Schilling and Curt Schilling. It's available everywhere. Thanks a lot, guys.

SHONDA SCHILLING: Thank you.

CURT SCHILLING: Thank you.

GLENN: Back in just a second.

(Out at 10:56 a.m.)

HOUR 3

GLENN: From high above Times Square in Midtown Manhattan, this is the third most listened to show in all of America. My name is Glenn Beck. So, last hour we spent some time with Shonda Schilling. She has a new book out called the Best Kind Of Different and it's about her family and the journey through Asperger's and it's an amazing tale and I think it will give husbands, wives, moms and dads and families hope that you're not that you're not that different. We all have no matter what it is, we all kind of face our own kind of journal me and we all feel kind of the same things. I don't have anybody in my family who has Asperger's, but we all feel many of the same pressures. So, we had a conversation about that. And Curt Schilling is sitting in the studio with his wife and we never had any conversation there and when I shut off the mikes, all the guys said, What the hell, you I mean, the guy I mean I'm, like, Yeah, yeah, whatever. I mean, isn't O. J. Simpson a Hall of Famer, too? I mean

CURT SCHILLING: Ouch.

GLENN: And so we were talking off the air and I just wanted to find of continue our conversation that we had off the air about what's happening in our country because, you know, these guys are going to talk to you about sports, but you're a businessman.

CURT SCHILLING: Yes.

GLENN: And you run a big business in Massachusetts.

CURT SCHILLING: Yes.

GLENN: Which I don't even know you do it. I mean, I'm struggling to keep the doors open in Manhattan. And, you know, when Rush Limbaugh left Manhattan, the response was from the governor here, If I would have known it was that easy to get relinquish Limbaugh to leave, I would have done it a lot sooner. And they were talking about taxes.

CURT SCHILLING: Right.

GLENN: I mean, you're taking somebody who is creating jobs

CURT SCHILLING: Right.

GLENN: And you're pushing them out.

CURT SCHILLING: Yeah.

GLENN: And they have no problem with that.

CURT SCHILLING: Yeah, yeah. I own a software gaming company called 38 Studios and it's something that I started before my career ended, which was probably my first and biggest mistake because, you know, I assumed, Hey, you know, I'll just open this company and check in every now and then and see how

GLENN: Yeah, yeah. It didn't really work out this way.

CURT SCHILLING: It didn't really work that way, but, yeah, it's stunning to be able to watch politics on the state level play out as we it's a $60 billion industry last year, the video gaming industry. It's growing immensely quick and it's a lot of high education, high paying jobs and I've got about 160 employees, on our way to 3, 4, 500, hopefully a couple thousand. It's a potential multi billion dollar intellectual property we've created and so I'm really kind of, you know, the star athlete coming out of high school in a sense that I've got what every state wants now. I've got a company that's on the cusp of becoming something big, with a lot of job creation.

GLENN: We've had, we've had two states approach us and say, You come we've had New Hampshire and another state which shall not be named, approach us and say, Come here.

CURT SCHILLING: Yeah.

GLENN: Come here. We'll stand with you and we'll, you know we'll give you we'll cut your taxes in half because of what you've got in New York City. Hamas mass done that to you or have you had any other state that has done that?

CURT SCHILLING: We've actually been engaged in discussions. Massachusetts, that's where I started the company. That's where we're raising our family. That's where we want to be. We engaged the state about a year ago and we've had some dialog with them and the surprise has been the proactiveness of other states and other countries coming to us and asking us about potential moves. Listen, we've you know, we'll offer tax there's a big film tax credit thing that's going around in the country and a lot of states are complaining it's a hot ticket issue because they're not permanent jobs, they're not high paying jobs, but we've got Shutter Island was shot right in the town we live in. And we saw three or four local companies that are still that are in business and flourishing that would have been out of business, had that not happened. So, it's been an incredibly interesting couple of months for us.

PAT: Talking to former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling. Curt, I don't know if you were real political before 2004, but I've always been a Curt Schilling fan and I became a much bigger one, I think it was, late October, October of 2004, and you were on Good Morning America.

CURT SCHILLING: Yeah.

PAT: And here you are, star pitcher for the Boston Red Sox and you're on Good Morning America and you said something like I don't remember if I remember the exact quote, but it was something like, Tell everybody to vote and vote Bush.

CURT SCHILLING: Yeah.

STU: And it stunned the world.

SHONDA SCHILLING: I still feel the oh, my goodness, because I was sitting right next to him.

CURT SCHILLING: That went over well in Massachusetts. That went over really, really well.

PAT: That's a brave thing to do when you're a super star in Boston.

CURT SCHILLING: That's ignorance on my part.

GLENN: But hold it just a second. Is everybody in Boston, you know, in lockstep with I mean, I

CURT SCHILLING: You're asking the question you already know the answer to, I think.

GLENN: Not everybody is in lockstep.

PAT: But the vast majority, aren't they? I mean, you must have got a lot of flack. It was a Kerry state.

CURT SCHILLING: Listen. We have received more hate mail. We've received threats.

PAT: Rhetoric in mail?

CURT SCHILLING: Our charitable endeavors suffered financially significantly from that. Working with ALS, Shonda's Shade Foundation. She's a cancer survivor.

PAT: Really?

CURT SCHILLING: Nothing has even approached close to the vitriol we got from that comment.

GLENN: Hold it. This is from the right, from the Tea Parties, before the Tea Parties even started? Because the left doesn't do that.

CURT SCHILLING: Right.

PAT: They're tolerant and inclusive and loving.

CURT SCHILLING: Sure, sure.

GLENN: I love what Curt said. Curt said it wasn't Shonda. It was somebody else that was with you that said, You guys have to have security? And Curt said, It wasn't a concierge that met us in the lobby.

PAT: And then the other thing you got involved a little bit about Scott Brown, as well.

CURT SCHILLING: Right.

PAT: Do you know him very well?

CURT SCHILLING: Better than I did, yes, and there has been some discussion. Senator McCain is a very close friend of mine. There had been some discussion early on about me potentially running for the vacant seat and after I talked to some people in the republican party and talked to Shonda. It probably you know, when you retired from baseball, you tend to want to go to the other way from a privacy standpoint. You want to get more private. And I believe that an elected official, it's a 365 day a year job, 24/7.

PAT: It is.

CURT SCHILLING: And it just turned out to probably in the be the best thing. I heard from the Brown campaign at the time that, Hey, they were interested in having us support them and I said I needed to understood who he was and what he stood for before I would come out and publicly endorse them.

PAT: And then you had the Coakley thing, where she called you a Yankee fan. I mean, that did nothing but help Brown.

CURT SCHILLING: Do you know what? That people asked me abut did that offend. I didn't care. I just

PAT: Right.

CURT SCHILLING: It was more a matter of a reflection with how out of touch she was with the constituents in the state.

GLENN: I know. I couldn't believe she said that.

PAT: I know you were really surprised.

GLENN: Do you know what even I

PAT: There's a girl who doesn't understand baseball as much as me? That was a surprise. I think that was.

GLENN: It was. I have to just point something out. Shonda, I watched your body language when you started talking approximate when your husband started talking about running for an empty seat and your body language completely closed down. It is exactly, exactly what happens when people my wife is with me or any of my children are with me and when they somebody says, why don't you run, you can see it in the body language. What were you

SHONDA SCHILLING: Well, my first thought is a father, a single father of four wouldn't be a good candidate, but, do you know what? He is okay with because he's been doing it for 18 years, but it's horrible to see the stuff that's written about him all the time and not be affected by that. I don't think I will ever be okay with it. So, there's that sense of just sadness that there are people out there that are that malicious and that miserable, to follow everything he does just to make it a political point, that he doesn't have any freedom

CURT SCHILLING: Look. I lived in the ultimate macho environment, right? 23 years in a clubhouse. Nothing is sacred in a clubhouse. You said everything about everything, about everybody, because that's how you cope. That's how you get through it. And so, you know, a lot of this political back and forth and a lot of things you hear people say about you, it's a water off the duck's back for me.

GLENN: Let me ask you this. When you're in the clubhouse for those many years, did you ever engage in a tickle fight with other men?

CURT SCHILLING: We had our own probably pornographic versions of those, but, yeah, it's not something I I think we should interview there.

GLENN: Guys, I appreciate it very much.

CURT SCHILLING: Thank you.

SHONDA SCHILLING: Thank you.

GLENN: The Best Kind Of Different, Our Family's Journey With Asperger's Syndrome, Shonda Schilling and Curt Schilling, in book stores everywhere. Back in just a second.

Everything comes down to the two Senate runoffs in Georgia. If we lose both races, we lose the country. Democrats know this and are pouring in millions to usher in a Marxist agenda.

As the Left tries to hide how radical the two candidates really are, Glenn takes us inside the Democrat war room to expose the wolf in pastor's clothing, Raphael Warnock, and America's Justin Trudeau, Jon Ossoff. Socialism, the Green New Deal, and "defund the police" are all on the table. And Glenn warns of what's to come if conservatives don't activate: Chuck Schumer will weaponize the Senate, and the radical Left will launch an all-out assault to ravage the Constitution.

Watch the full special below:

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Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) joined the "Glenn Beck Radio Program" to explain how mail-in ballots are typically disqualified during recounts at a far higher rate than in-person, Election Day ballots, and why this is "good news" for President Donald Trump's legal battle over the election.

"One of the things that gives the greatest cause for optimism is, this election ... there's a pretty marked disparity in terms of how the votes were distributed. On Election Day, with in-person voting, Donald Trump won a significant majority of the votes cast on in-person voting on Election Day. Of mail-in voting, Joe Biden won a significant majority of the votes cast early on mail-in voting," Cruz explained.

"Now, here's the good news: If you look historically to recounts, if you look historically to election litigation, the votes cast in person on Election Day tend to stand. It's sort of hard to screw that up. Those votes are generally legal, and they're not set aside. Mail-in votes historically have a much higher rate of rejection … when they're examined, there are a whole series of legal requirements that vary state by state, but mail-in votes consistently have a higher rate of rejection, which suggests that as these votes begin being examined and subjected to scrutiny, that you're going to see Joe Biden's vote tallies go down. That's a good thing," he added. "The challenge is, for President Trump to prevail, he's got to run the table. He's got to win, not just in one state but in several states. That makes it a lot harder to prevail in the litigation. I hope that he does so, but it is a real challenge and we shouldn't try to convince ourselves otherwise."

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Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean is perhaps even more disgusted with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) for his coronavirus response than BlazeTV's Stu Burguiere (read what Stu has to say on the subject here), and for a good reason.

She lost both of her in-laws to COVID-19 in New York's nursing homes after Gov. Cuomo's infamous nursing home mandate, which Cuomo has since had scrubbed from the state's website and blamed everyone from the New York Post to nursing care workers to (every leftist's favorite scapegoat) President Donald Trump.

Janice joined Glenn and Stu on the "Glenn Beck Radio Program" Tuesday to ask why mainstream media is not holding Gov. Cuomo — who recently published a book about his leadership during the COVID-19 pandemic — accountable?

"I'm vocal because I have not seen the mainstream media ask these questions or demand accountability of their leaders. [Cuomo] really has been ruling with an iron fist, and every time he does get asked a question, he blames everybody else except the person that signed that order," Janice said.

"In my mind, he's profiting off the over 30 thousand New Yorkers, including my in-laws, that died by publishing a book on 'leadership' of New York," she added. "His order has helped kill thousands of relatives of New York state. And this is not political, Glenn. This is not about Republican or Democrat. My in-laws were registered Democrats. This is not about politics. This is about accountability for something that went wrong, and it's because of your [Cuomo's] leadership that we're put into this situation."

Watch the video excerpt from the show below:

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As America grows divided and afraid to disagree with the Democrats' woke plan for America, Megyn Kelly is ready to fight back for the truth. For nearly two decades, she navigated the volatile and broken world of the media. But as America leans on independent voices more than ever, she's breaking new ground with "The Megyn Kelly Show."

She joined the latest Glenn Beck Podcast to break down what's coming next after the election: Black Lives Matter is mainstream, leftists are making lists of Trump supporters, and the Hunter Biden scandal is on the back burner.

Megyn and Glenn reminisce about their cable news days (including her infamous run-in with then-presidential candidate Donald Trump) and to look into the chaotic and shady world of journalism and the growing entitlement it's bred. For example, many conservatives have been shocked by how Fox News handled the election.

Megyn defended Fox News, saying she believes Fox News' mission "is a good one," but also didn't hold back on hosts like Neil Cavuto, who cut off a White House briefing to fact check it — something she never would have done, even while covering President Obama.

Megyn also shared this insightful takeaway from her time at NBC: "Jane Fonda was an ass."

Watch the full podcast here:

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