America by Heart - Sarah Palin



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GLENN: We have Sarah Palin on the phone with us. Where are you, Sarah?

SARAH PALIN: I am in Phoenix, Arizona.

GLENN: Phoenix? That's kind of the anti‑Alaska.

SARAH PALIN: We're thawing out.

GLENN: Let me ‑‑ first of all I want to talk about your new book, America By Heart: Reflections on Family, Faith and Flag and we'll get to that in a second, but there's so much to talk about. There's the TSA, the pat‑downs. China and Russia said today that they are quitting the U.S. dollar. There's north and South Korea, but I want to start with the tough question and that is are you considering running for president just so you can try Jennifer Grey for war crimes?

SARAH PALIN: Oh, my goodness. Yeah, let's get right to the Dancing With the Stars.

GLENN: Yeah. I mean, let's go right for the war crimes of Jennifer. Seriously, war crimes or just ‑‑

PAT: You hate her, don't you? How much do you hate her for beating Bristol?

SARAH PALIN: Can you believe how people are just so wacko?

GLENN: They're so nuts about this and it's like, it's ‑‑ we were talking about it last hour. The guys were joking about all of this about how much you just hate Jennifer Grey now and they are just trying to cause trouble for you. And ‑‑ because you don't have enough. And I said, do you know a soul that really even cares about this? I mean, it's a stupid show; let it go, people. Let it go.

SARAH PALIN: Well, even as Mark Ballas, Bristol's partner, said, you know, we're talking about a little disco ball here and there's a lot going on in the world today. Really? Is this what we're going to talk about?

GLENN: It's really nuts. So let's ‑‑

SARAH PALIN: It's nuts.


America by Heart : Reflections on Family, Faith, and Flag


by Sarah Palin


GLENN: Let's not talk about that. Well, you know what? Actually let me transition from Bristol to the book in this regard. You talk in the book a lot about family. You have the new TV show, which is tremendous, by the way. I think you're out of your mind.

SARAH PALIN: (Laughing).

GLENN: I saw you climbing the side of a mountain and I'm like, I don't know. I mean, is there food up there or something that is making this worthwhile?

PAT: Glenn wants to trade places with you, Sarah. He wants you ‑‑

GLENN: No, I don't.

PAT: You live in New York for a week and he'll climb glaciers in Alaska for a week.

SARAH PALIN: Try to exchange the jungle environment?

GLENN: Yeah, yeah, you go ahead.

PAT: Sit in meetings all day long with ‑‑

GLENN: People who just don't get it, ever? Ever?

PAT: Well, with the exception of some in those meetings who always get it.

GLENN: Really? No, no.

PAT: No?

GLENN: I can't think, with the exception of anyone.

PAT: All right.

GLENN: But the one thing that my wife and I were talking about is the exposure of your family. And I know the press has exposed the family, but you don't seem to have a problem with that. What do you think the effect of all of this is on your kids?

SARAH PALIN: Well, I'm just dealing with reality knowing that they're not going to let up until the collective will of the people is to remind the press that kids should be off limits. And in our case that just isn't happening yet. So I deal with the reality as it is and remind my kids that maybe in our culture there's not a lot of justice in terms of kids being left alone to just be kids and make mistakes but learn as they go and overcome challenges, you know. My kids have the same story as every other kid in this world.

GLENN: But my kids are left alone. I mean, but I just don't, I don't ever, ever put them in front of a camera. You know, anybody takes a picture of my kids, I go all TSA on them.

SARAH PALIN: Yeah, here's the deal. Here's the deal, what we got ourselves into, I guess, was there on the national stage, literally there at the GOP convention when I, being so proud of my family, bringing them on stage like every other politician has done since the beginning of time, being charged then with exploiting my kids and here I'm looking around going, wait, every other candidate, every male candidate brings their family on stage, proverbially and literally. So having done that. And then from there just sort of a different standard that's been applied in terms of the accusations that there's been exploitation or using the kids for whatever. Then, Glenn, having to correct the record and try to change the narrative into what the truth is about my family. So constantly being on defense and having to sort of counterattack the things that they say. That's the position that we're in.

GLENN: I will tell you this, that I, you know, I watched the first episode of your show and I saw you and Todd with the kids, and I saw the relationship that you and Todd have and I mean, I don't know ‑‑ you know, I don't know how you do it, but I liked the relationship that you two have. And he is just so anchored that, you know, I think there's an advantage to living up in Alaska to where it seems relatively normal in comparison to what this circus is. I think your family would really be hurt living in New York or Los Angeles or some place like that. It just, it's insane what's going on.

SARAH PALIN: Well, that pioneering spirit, that independence, that self‑resilience that is part of being an Alaskan, yes, that is the anchor. You combine that with having great faith in the knowledge that God has everything under control, He's got it all in His hands, we put our faith in God and those two elements help us just muster through.

GLENN: Now, you refer to yourself in the book as a feminist, which ‑‑ well, I'll just ask you straight: I believe you are a feminist. I believe you are a strong woman and you're like, get out of my way but not to the denigration of men. You just, you're kind of like a ‑‑ you're kind of like Texas, where Texas is proud of their state and they think it's better than everything else but not to ‑‑ they don't hate other states. You don't have to hate men to be a feminist. Did you just put this in the book just to piss the left off?

SARAH PALIN: Well, that certainly has been the result, hasn't it?

GLENN: Yeah.

SARAH PALIN: And that's fine, too. You know, Glenn, those gals who have hijacked that term feminist and then try to invalidate or discredit a conservative feminist, they baffle me because they're so inconsistent, they make absolutely no sense. And I think that the whole argument has turned on its head when they try to say we're speaking for all women when we, essentially we try to make women feel like victims, we don't like men and we are trying to really disempower women. This is my view on these feminists who came out of the Sixties and Seventies, some of them who led the charge, trying to make women feel less able, incapable of taking on all that life has to offer by making them feel like they're victims and if they don't, if they don't get a little bit of extra support, usually it's from government they would like the support, then women aren't capable of taking on the challenges. And I'm saying, no, you know, just like the pioneering women of, you know, decades and decades ago, generations ago. These women, they are the ones who pioneered through the West and alongside the men they plowed the fields and taught their children and raised families and contributed to their small communities and grew those communities. That's the same spirit that so many of these common sense mama grizzlies have who are running for office because they are saying we don't need government to do it for us.

GLENN: Yeah, it's a gun and a child on their hip. They got it done, the pioneering women, man, my grandmother was a pioneer. She came across the mountains in a wagon train and she ‑‑ the only story I know about her is she lost an eye on the trail.

SARAH PALIN: Really?

GLENN: I don't know how it happened, and she looked like a woman who lost her eye. And she lost an eye on the trail and the only story we have about her was when it happened she went, I'm fine, keep moving.

SARAH PALIN: Oh, man. That's strong. You know, that's that self‑sufficiency. And those gals back then, they weren't going to be bound by what society maybe across the waters were going to say what they should do and what they should be. They were just determined to create their own destiny. And they are, too, whom we get to forge, helping to forge these new lands and create America.

GLENN: You talk about Mr. Smith Goes to Washington an awful lot in the book which you know is one of my favorite movies, and Frank Capra was ridiculed at the time for It's a Wonderful Life and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, and Hollywood hated him. They mocked him, they panned his movies, and they are classics. I hope that you watch on December 15th when we go to Wilmington, Ohio. I don't know if you've ever been there, but this is Bedford Falls or It's a Wonderful Life. This town is Frank Capra city. It's amazing. And most people think that doesn't exist, and you and I both know it does.

SARAH PALIN: It does. And see, that's been part of my foundation. And I know that I, and you too, we get mocked for this perceived naivety and this unrelenting optimism that we have about America and those who want to be self‑determined and just, you know, get government off our back and make decisions for ourselves because we have a lot of faith in the individual and the rights that God has given us and government maybe tries to take it away and that's why we fight those government actions that would take away our God‑given rights. But that's part of my foundation, and I was brought up to love and to cherish even things like Mr. Smith Goes to Washington and It's a Wonderful Life which we watch every Christmas. And folks who don't understand where I'm coming from perhaps believe that I put too much faith in those ideals that are encapsulated in those pop culture films and yet I'm saying no, no, no, no, America needs to get back to that. But these are things that maybe Hollywood would never dare make again, films like that. Maybe, Glenn, you need to get into that business, too, and you can help shift some pop culture, please.

GLENN: Just wait. We are. Just wait.

SARAH PALIN: Good, good, good. Good. And why you need to do it, Glenn, is we are to be salt and light out in the world. We are not to just assume that our own little circle of influence within our church or within our own little neighborhood or our small family, that we're going to get out there and change the world just by preaching to the choir? No. Pop culture is the great influencer in our society. We are called to and we should be proud to and not hesitate to get out there and show them what truth can be and what can ‑‑ what light can shed on some darkness in the world. And that's how we're going to change the world.

PAT: Sarah, you said in the last few days that you are considering a run for president.

SARAH PALIN: Yes.

PAT: And polls show that you would probably win the Republican nomination. How would you handle a situation like just developed in North Korea?

SARAH PALIN: Well, North Korea, this is stemming from I think a greater problem when we're all sitting around asking, "Oh, no, what are we going to do" and we're not having a lot of faith that the White House is going to come out with a strong enough policy to sanction what it is that North Korea's going to do. So this speaks to a bigger picture here that certainly scares me in terms of our national security policies. But obviously got to stand with our North Korean allies. We're bound to by treaty. We're also bound to by ‑‑

STU: South Korea.

SARAH PALIN: Yeah. And we're also bound by prudence to stand with our South Korean allies, yes. And, you know, to remind North Korea, well, we're not going to reward bad behavior and we're not going to walk away and we do need to press China to do more to increase pressure on that arena.

GLENN: How do we press China? I mean, Sarah, I'm going to go way out on a lunatic fringe here but I've talked to enough people are in this missile business who say that was not an airplane contrail that we saw off the coast of California. It is my belief that that was a two‑stage missile launched by China telling, sending a signal that the world has changed. They're dropping the dollar in their trade with Russia today. I mean, they control the world. The world has changed. We're no longer the superpower that we were even two years ago.

SARAH PALIN: Well, that's right. And China's going to own our notes because we are becoming so beholden on them. And a lot of this has to do with energy. When we're not allowed to responsibly exploit our own natural resources, and that's, of course, one of the ways that America grew into such a prosperous nation.

GLENN: Yes.

SARAH PALIN: We developed domestically our own energy supplies. Instead as we're reliant on foreign sources of energy, here's one thing that we can do in pressing China. They need to restrict energy exports to North Korea. But do you think that the Obama administration gets that and understands why we would need to? No, they do not because they're still locking up the lands that are warehousing our own domestic supplies of energy. So they have it all wrong on energy policy to start with.

GLENN: Real quick. If you were going through the scanners today, are you going through the scanners, you getting the pat‑down or what?

SARAH PALIN: Either one just is just so intrusive. You know, I think I would do the pat‑down because I don't want the naked pictures, you know.

GLENN: Yeah, yeah. I know. You're ‑‑ I can guarantee you, Sarah, when you fly commercially, if you take that scanner, I can guarantee you the picture of you will come out. I can guarantee you.

SARAH PALIN: Of course it will.

GLENN: It will.

SARAH PALIN: Of course it will because things have already leaked out about things we have had in our luggage and we're like, how do they know this kind of stuff and who leaks this kind of stuff? But Glenn, what worries me is ‑‑

GLENN: Now I want to know what was in your luggage but I'm out of time.

SARAH PALIN: (Inaudible) hot dogs and we snuck through. But no, it's ‑‑ you know, I think about my teenage daughters. I don't want somebody frisking them, you know, and maybe that's just the mama in me again, but we've got to have a ‑‑ we've got to profile the bad guys and we've got to profile their behavior, those who we assume could do some damage on an airplane. And we go search them and then, yeah, there's got to be that assurance that everybody getting on the airplane isn't carrying a weapon. All of us absolutely. But nothing like TSA thinks that they are going to get away with today. Not when they're not even profiling those who could be doing the damage.

GLENN: Okay. Thank you very much. Sarah, great talking to you.

SARAH PALIN: Thank you.

GLENN: Have a great Thanksgiving and best of luck. The new book is America By Heart: Reflections on Family, Faith and Flag available in bookstores everywhere. Have a great tour and stay safe, Sarah.

SARAH PALIN: Thank you. Talk to you later. Bye.


 

Christmas is the gift that keeps on giving for radical leftists. This charade goes on year after year, where decent folks across America try to enjoy and celebrate Christmas, and a few militant progressives disapprove. It's exhausting. We get it, you don't like Christmas. And that's totally fine. But entire communities of people who do like to celebrate Christmas are tired of their celebration being held hostage by an extreme minority—sometimes just one person—getting offended.

This year, a self-described “Unintentional Grinch who stole Christmas" is in the lead to win Scrooge of the Year. The principal at Manchester Elementary in Omaha, Nebraska sent her teachers a memo this week outlining all the Christmas-related items and activities that will not be allowed in their classrooms.

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The banned list includes:

  • Santa
  • Christmas trees
  • Elf on the Shelf
  • Singing Christmas carols
  • Playing Christmas music
  • Making an ornament as a gift
  • Any red and green items
  • Reindeer
  • And, of course, candy canes. Not because the sugar will make the children hyper, but because, as the principal explains, the candy cane is shaped like a “J" for Jesus.

She writes, “the red is for the blood of Christ, and the white is a symbol of his resurrection." In case you try to cheat, different-colored candy canes are not allowed either.

Why is this principal going out of her way to delete any trace of Christmas in her school? She explains:

“I come from a place that Christmas and the like are not allowed in schools…"

Her list, “aligns with my interpretation of our expectations as a public school who seeks to be inclusive and culturally sensitive to all of our students."

What about being culturally sensitive toward students who do celebrate Christmas?

Kids will survive if they're accidentally exposed to a Santa.

The irony here, for this principal and others who hate Christmas and the Christianity that undergirds it, is that Christmas has long existed on two parallel tracks. You've got the Christian celebration of the birth of Christ on one, and you've got the Santa Claus, secular mythology on the other. That means there is more than enough about the Christmas season that has nothing to do with Jesus if that's your thing.

You don't need a totalitarian list of forbidden things to protect the children from a 2,000-year-old holiday. Kids will survive if they're accidentally exposed to a Santa, or a Christmas carol, or—heaven forbid—a manger scene.

Avenatti bails on 2020 presidential run, leaving Biden as 'most qualified' — really?

Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for Politicon

Well, that de-escalated quickly. Michael Avenatti, lawyer of Stormy Daniels, announced he will not run for president in 2020 after all. That takes the number of Democrats planning to challenge Trump down to around 724.

In a statement, Avenatti said he would still run, but he decided not to out of respect for his family's “concerns." He didn't list their concerns, but said:

“We will not prevail in 2020 without a fighter. I remain hopeful the party finds one."

Speaking of — if you've been wondering who's the most qualified person in America to be president, wonder no more. It's former vice president Joe Biden.

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How do we know? Because ol' Joe told us so, at a book tour stop in Montana. The 76-year-old says he'll make a decision about a 2020 bid within the next two months, which is campaign-speak for “I'm definitely running, so get out your checkbooks."

Biden admitted:

“I am a gaffe machine, but my God what a wonderful thing compared to a guy who can't tell the truth."

Yeah, about that… the first time Biden ran for president, in 1987, he was actually pulling ahead of the Democratic pack until his campaign got snagged on plagiarism. He got caught lifting entire sections of a speech by Neil Kinnock, a British Labor Party candidate who ran for Prime Minister and lost to Margaret Thatcher. It wasn't just the fact that Biden copied exact sections of Kinnock's speech, he also stole biographical facts from Kinnock's life and tried to pass them off as his own — like saying his ancestors were coal miners.

The most qualified person in the country to be president? Maybe in the mind of Joe Biden.

Perhaps in the pre-Internet era, Biden thought he could get away with it. But he didn't. An adviser for Michael Dukakis' campaign saw a tape of Kinnock's speech and put together a side-by-side comparison video of Biden's plagiarizing, then sent the tape to the New York Times. As reporters dug further into the story, they found that Biden had also lifted large portions of speeches by Robert Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey.

Those revelations led Biden to admit he got an “F" for a course in law school after he plagiarized five pages for a term paper. Biden was caught in more lies about his academic credentials and enough embarrassments mounted that he finally withdrew from the race.

The most qualified person in the country to be president? Maybe in the mind of Joe Biden.

Saturday Night Live writer Nimesh Patel, an Emmy-nominated comedian, is the latest victim in campus culture's wacky game. Patel is the first Indian-American writer for SNL, so by the usual standards of identity politics, he should be safe. Not the case. All of the rules went out the window when he was performing a stand-up comedy set for an event called "cultureSHOCK: Reclaim" at Columbia University hosted by the Asian American Alliance.

He joked that being gay cannot be a choice because “no one looks in the mirror and thinks, 'this black thing is too easy, let me just add another thing to it.'"

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For one, that's less of a joke and more of a statement. It's exactly the kind of safe, pro-LGBT statement that you would think campus feminists and trans activists would squeal with glee to hear.

According to Columbia's school paper, student organizers, offended by Patel's joke, rushed the stage 30 minutes into the set and told Patel that he needed to finish his set and say a few closing remarks.

Patel argued that his jokes were not offensive, and that they were actually much-needed insights into the real world. He also made it clear that he stands in solidarity with the Asian American Alliance.

They still cut his microphone off and booted him off stage.

Patel hasn't commented on the uproar, but here are a few comments from people who were in the audience:

The Columbia Spectator quoted three students who were in the audience. One of them said:

“The message they were trying to send with the event was opposite to the jokes he was making, and using people's ethnicity as the crux of his jokes could be funny but still offensive... He definitely wasn't the most crass comedian I've ever heard but for the event it was inappropriate."

Another student said:

“I really dislike when people who are older say that our generation needs to be exposed to the real world. Obviously the world is not a safe space but just accepting that it's not and continuing to perpetuate the un-safeness of it… is saying that it can't be changed," said Jao. “When older generations say you need to stop being so sensitive, it's like undermining what our generation is trying to do in accepting others and making it safer."

The radical version of leftism that has overtaken college campuses... will eat their own without thinking twice.

The third student wasn't bothered by the jokes:

“While what some of the things that he said might have been a bit provoking to some of the audience, as someone who watches comedy a lot, none of them were jokes that I hadn't heard before and none of them were jokes that elicited such a response in my experience."

The third student is a little ray of hope in all of this, but I'm afraid that people like her are increasingly outnumbered and unwilling to speak up.

The jokes were clearly not racist or homophobic. If anything, they seem to have been designed to pander to overly sensitive campus activists who all too often cry “racist" and “homophobic" and all their other insults.

It just goes to show that the left, particularly the radical version of leftism that has overtaken college campuses, will stop at nothing to push its postmodern narrative. They'll spare nobody. And they will eat their own without thinking twice.

Forbes recently described student loan debt as the $1.5 trillion crisis, adding that "Student loan debt is now the second highest consumer debt category - behind only mortgage debt - and higher than both credit cards and auto loans," which is affecting 44 million borrowers in the U.S.

There's also the cultural effect that college is having, the indoctrination that young people are being subjected to. More and more powerful people are recognizing that college as an institution is a problem.

Last Friday, Peter Thiel gave a keynote speech at the Intercollegiate Studies Institute's Collegiate Network editors' conference. He told a roomful of 100 students:

Universities today are as corrupt as the Catholic Church of 500 years ago. At some point, if it's 100 to zero, you start to suspect you're in North Korea. Does the unanimity mean you've gotten to the truth, or does it mean you're in a totalitarian state. We have this illusion that all sorts of important decisions have been decided.

He added:

We are not on the losing side of history. The other side is on the losing side. The reformation is going to happen, and it won't come from within, but from the outside.

Thiel has worked actively to bring about the change that he's talking about here. The lawsuit he led against Gawker helped topple their empire of filth and lowest-level journalism. He has also created The Thiel Fellowship, which "gives $100,000 to young people who want to build new things instead of sitting in a classroom. The idea that we are on the losing side is a form of psychological warfare."

We're not on the losing side. Not in the slightest.

And he's right. We're not on the losing side. Not in the slightest. We're on the up-and-up. Things are only going to get better from here.