Glenn Beck: The Woman who can't Forget




The Woman Who Can't Forget


by Jill Price

GLENN:  Now, most people will say, oh, well, she wants the attention.  No, she doesn't.  No, she doesn't.  Because she's not a freak.  The only reason why she wants to tell her story -- and this just happened to come out in the interview.  I just kind of mentioned this because, you know, it makes sense to me.  She's got the anti-Alzheimer's.  That's why she wrote the book, because she believes there are other people that are hiding in the shadows with perfect recollection that maybe science can study their brains like they're studying hers now.  Maybe in her head is the cure to Alzheimer's.

Jill Price has agreed to come on the program with us now.  Hello, Jill, how are you?

PRICE:  I'm good, Glenn, how are you?

GLENN:  Have I misstated anything?  Are you tired of this?

PRICE:  You know, I'm not tired of it.  I'm just tired.  It's exhausting and that's when I wrote the letter to the doctors, that's when I told them that it was exhausting for me.

GLENN:  May I -- and please feel free to say no.  May I go into the territory that you and I talked about right off the air when we finished that I said to you I knew about this but I didn't want to go -- I didn't want to go there because, out of your feelings?

PRICE:  Yeah, you can talk about that.

GLENN:  The reason why -- and I said to Jill, I've got to believe this is hell.  You not only have perfect recollection.  Explain the movie screen, the split screen in your head.

PRICE:  Well, like I'm sitting here talking to you but I also have a running movie of endless memories that just are constantly flowing through my head, free flowing.  So it's not anything that is connected to one other thing.  It's just constant, you know, memories throughout my life.  It's like watching a home video.

GLENN:  And you can -- and you know -- if you witness it or you saw it or you were around it, you can remember --

PRICE:  If I was interested in it, yeah.

GLENN:  Like if I said to you -- because you're a big TV buff.  If I said to you Magnum PI, what was the show before it and after it?

PRICE:  I know Simon and Simon was on during that time, but I really wasn't -- I didn't really watch Magnum PI.  I watched Simon and Simon and Landon.

GLENN:  So you have to -- if I give you a date, you can remember what you had for breakfast?

PRICE:  I pretty much remember the whole day.

GLENN:  So if I said to you August 1st, 1984, what were you doing?

PRICE:  It was a Wednesday and I had just come home from summer school from college a few weeks earlier and I was -- you know, every day it's not like every -- amazing things happened every day, but I remember something, I was with some friends of mine at the supermarket that night and I was wearing Koala bear slippers.

GLENN:  Stu give me a -- I'm just trying to prove a point.  I don't mean to make this into a parlor trick, but can you give me that date, Stu?

PRICE:  I'm sorry?

GLENN:  December 21st, 1988.

PRICE:  That was a Wednesday and that was the day that Lockerbie airplane crashed, Pan Am 103.

GLENN:  I just said to Stu off the air, I said find out the Lockerbie downing.

PRICE:  And my first recollection is of sitting and watching my soap opera and Dan Rather breaking in with the news.

GLENN:  What was the soap opera

PRICE:  As the world turns

GLENN:  And what was happening at the time?

PRICE:  That I don't remember.

GLENN:  You told me when we got off the air when I said to you that this is hell and you said to me that you have all of the feelings with the memories, and we talked about that a little bit.  And then you said, my husband passed away a couple of years ago.

PRICE:  Uh-huh.

GLENN:  So you remember your first kiss, unlike I would remember my first kiss.

PRICE:  Yeah.  I remember my first date which actually last Friday, the 27th was the first anniversary of that.

GLENN:  So you remember detail and you actually have the feelings that go with it.  So time doesn't heal you.

PRICE:  Correct.

GLENN:  What is that like?

PRICE:  It's tormenting.  And that's why after -- I was 34 and I just, I could not take it anymore and I Googled memory and obtained Dr. McGaugh's web page and I knew when I read his information that this was the man that I needed to talk to.

GLENN:  What did you say?  When you called him up, what did you say?

PRICE:  Well, I wrote him an e-mail and I explained that since I was 11 years old, I could basically tell you everything that happened and that I have a running movie in my head and that it's exhausting and I wanted to talk to him.

GLENN:  And what is your first memory?

PRICE:  Of my life?

GLENN:  Yeah.

PRICE:  Being in the crib and having my great-uncle -- like I was sleeping and my first memory is opening my eyes and seeing my great-uncle's dog staring back at me.

GLENN:  How old were you?

PRICE:  I was probably about 18 months.  And I remember -- I have three memories in the crib, but I could tell you a ton of memories from the time I lived in New York until I was 5 and then in New Jersey until I was 8.  But once I moved to California, everything started to become more clear where I could give you exact dates and tell you the days and that fine tuned itself for about the next six years.  So I was 14

GLENN:  How do you forgive yourself and forgive others if you are reinjured by the -- you know, many of us will, at least me, I know that I can't hold grudges because I kind of forget.  I'm like, oh, yeah, I was pissed at you.  I just kind of move on from it.

PRICE:  Right.

GLENN:  And I kind of just remember, oh, yeah, we had a problem but I'm not really sure.  You're reinjured either by the things that you did in the past or by the things that others did, and you have full recollection of it.  How do you move past that?

PRICE:  Well, considering myself, you know, I don't give myself a break and I'm really hard on myself and that's why this is so tormenting to me.  When it comes to friends and family, I have somehow managed -- I don't forget it and I never forget it but I've had to somehow manage how to rise above it or I would have no friends.  And I have to do that to be able to survive in society.

GLENN:  And you never really went into it.  Your friends just all thought, "Oh, wow, you've got a really good memory.

PRICE:  Well, they understand that it's a little bit more than that where I can -- I'll call them up and say, do you know what we did 20 years ago.  So they know that it's really, really good but they've never really understood the torment that this has caused me.

GLENN:  How -- have you noticed, do people generally remember the same way?  For instance, if you and I were friends and we had a long, you know, relationship where we were always doing things together, have you noticed that individuals remember things in patterns, or do we remember things in patterns as a group?  For instance, your life must be very frustrating to where you're like, no, that's not what happened.

PRICE:  Exactly.  Exactly.

GLENN:  Right.

PRICE:  And I have to -- and that's happened recently where I was with some friends and somebody was telling a story and I was like, no, that's not really the way it happened.  And I don't like to do that because I don't like to call people out.

GLENN:  You would be a massive drag.  You know what?  I've got to tell you something.  It would be perfect.  We should have you just be the person that does security everywhere.  You could be an eyewitness everywhere.  I mean, I've got to tell you if you ever have it out for somebody, they're doomed.  Because all you have to do is --

PRICE:  And that's not my personality.

GLENN:  That's good.

PRICE:  You know, I'm not like that.  But that's happened where I'm -- that's not how the story went.  Or I'll be telling -- like recently I told a friend of mine a story about something that played out over ten years and she did not remember any of it and her husband looked at her and said, if Jill's telling you, that's just the way it is.  So people know that when I'm telling them something that it is the truth.

GLENN:  What have you learned about people outside of you about our memories?  Have you noticed or looked at patterns of how we forget or things that we forget?  Have you noticed any pattern that, oh, wow, I can see why they didn't remember it that way?

PRICE:  No, not really.  I just notice that people -- like, my story never changes, but every -- from listening to people I realize that they just, their memories fade.  So they don't see it the way it really happened.  So they kind of -- it's changed a little bit.

GLENN:  Do we remember it more fondly or worse?  Or is it --

PRICE:  Oh, I think you guys remember it for fondly.  Because see, I remember, you know, the way it happened.  And that's very painful for me.

PRICE:  Well, I think that's why I'm interested in -- I was interested in the patterns and interested in, is it positive or negative because it's human nature.  You know, they say time heals.  That is a defense mechanism so we don't shut down.

PRICE:  Right.  And my memory has not protected me.

GLENN:  Have you ever been -- and if this is too personal, that's fine.  Have you ever been really depressed?  Has this ever caused you -- I would kill myself -- I mean, no --

PRICE:  Yes, I have.  I spent the first half of 1991 where I could barely leave my house, leave my bed.

GLENN:  Because of the things that were just going through your mind over and over and over again?

PRICE:  Well, there were things that had gone on over the previous five years that just paralyzed me after a while.

GLENN:  And again, you don't have to answer this question, Jill.  Gosh, I thank you so much for talking.  It's just so fascinating.  Do you think you're going to be able to fall in love again because you -- you still remember every detail of your husband and you still have that feeling and it doesn't fade.

PRICE:  You know, I'm still in that moment of when he died and it was three years.  So you know, I loved being married.  I was only married for two years.  I hope one day I get married again, but I really at this point, I don't know if I can even go there.

GLENN:  The name of the book is "The Woman Who Can't Forget" by Jill Price.  You believe that there are other people out there like you.  Does the doctor believe there are other people out there like you?

PRICE:  Yes.

GLENN:  Any idea of the amount or percentage of the population that might have something like this?

PRICE:  I don't know but I hope by coming forward, other people will come forward and he will be able to study a whole group of people to find out what's going on in our brains.

GLENN:  You are the only documented case on planet Earth.

PRICE:  Uh-huh.

GLENN:  Is it a chemical thing?  Is it a -- do they have any idea what's caused this?

PRICE:  They don't, but we did my brain scans in 2006 and I just got the results in January, and there are regions and structures in my brain that are three deviations bigger than the control group that I was compared to.

GLENN:  Her name is Jill Price.  The name of the book is "The woman who can't forget."  Jill, what a pleasure to talk to you.  Thank you so much.

PRICE:  Thanks, Glenn.

GLENN:  You bet.  Bye-bye.

Is that amazing?  Is that amazing?  That, you can't get on television.  That was a piece of the truth that you didn't hear on television because of no other fault other than just time, just time.  When we come back, I'm going to give you some pieces of television that are insidious.  The truth you haven't heard.

On Monday's episode of "The Glenn Beck Radio Program," Glenn opened up about the tragic death of his brother-in-law, Vincent Colonna Jr., who passed away unexpectedly on April 5. He also shared some of the important thoughts and insights he's learned through the grieving process.

"Last Monday, I was sitting in this chair ... the two-minute warning comes and Stu said to me, 'You ready for the show?'' ... And that's when my wife [Tania] came to the door of the studio here at our house and said, 'I...' and she held the phone up. And then she collapsed on the floor in tears," Glenn began. "Tania's brother had passed. To say this was a shock, is an understatement."

Glenn described his brother-in-law as having "a servant's spirit."

"He was always the guy who lit up the room. He was always the guy helping others. He would never stop, because he was always helping others," Glenn said of Vincent. "He was on the school board. He was a little league coach. He was the soccer coach. He helped build the church. He took care of the lawn of the church. He was constantly doing things, raising money for charity, working over here, helping to organize this. But he was never the guy in the spotlight. He was just the guy doing it, and you had no idea how much he had done because he never talked about it.

"We also didn't know how much mental anguish he was in because he never talked about it. And last Monday morning, after spending Easter with the family ... he killed himself. This is now the third family member of mine that has gone through this. And I keep seeing it play out over and over and over again, in exactly the same way."

Glenn described his thoughts as he, Tania, and her family struggled to come to grips with the devastating loss.

"I learned some really important things as I was watching this wake. I'm seeing these people from all walks of life ... the people that were there, were there because [Vince] made a difference in their life. He was a true servant. As I'm watching this, all that kept going through my mind was, 'by their fruits, ye shall know them.' The fruits of his labor were on display. He was a servant all the time. All the time ... he found a way to love everybody.

"There are two great commandments: Love God with all your heart and mind and soul. And love your neighbor. So those two great commandments boil down to: Love truth. Because that's what God is," Glenn said.

"Love thy neighbor. That's where joy comes from. The opposite of joy is despair, and that is the complete absence of hope ... and how do you find joy? You find joy by rooting yourself in the truth. Even if that's a truth you don't want to accept. Accept the truth," he added. "But we have to stop saying that there's nothing we can do. What are we going to do? Well, here's the first thing: stop living a lie."

Watch the video clip below to hear more from Glenn:


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After imprisoning a pastor for refusing to follow COVID-19 restrictions, Canadian officials barricaded his church. And when some church members retaliated by tearing down part of the fence, Canadian Mounties arrived in riot gear.

Rebel News Founder Ezra Levant joined Glenn Beck on the radio program to give his insight on the crazy situation. He described the new, armed police presence surrounding GraceLife Church in Edmonton, Alberta, and how it not only encouraged hundreds of protesters to stand with the church in support but forced congregation members underground to worship as well.

What's happening is eerily similar to what occurs everyday in China, Levant says, and it must stop. Who would have thought this type of tyranny would be so close to home?

Watch the video below to hear Ezra describe the religious persecution taking place in Canada.


Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

Enough prayers? Why is supposed Catholic Joe Biden suggesting that Congress ought to stop praying for after someone commits acts of gun violence?

On Friday, Stu Burguiere and Pat Gray filled in for Glenn and discussed President Joe Biden's remarks during his speech on gun control. "Enough prayers. Time for some action," Biden said. Stu and Pat were surprised how dismissive Biden appeared to be on the idea of prayer.

Watch the clip to hear more. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

Just days after Canadian pastor James Coates was released from prison for refusing to bow to COVID-19 lockdown restrictions, several police officers showed up at another church to ensure restrictions were being followed. But Polish pastor Artur Pawlowski of the Cave of Adullam Church in Alberta, Canada, knew his rights, telling the cops not to come back until they had a warrant in hand.

Filling in for Glenn Beck on the radio program this week, Pat Gray and Stu Burguiere played a video of the interaction.

"Please get out. Please get out of this property immediately. Get out!" Pawlowski can be heard yelling at the six officers who entered his church.

"Out! Out! Out! Get out of this property immediately until you come back with a warrant," he continued. "Go out and don't come back. I don't want to talk to you. You Nazis, Gestapo is not allowed here! ... Nazis are not welcome here! Do not come back you Nazi psychopaths. Unbelievable sick, evil people. Intimidating people in a church during the Passover! You Gestapo, Nazi, communist fascists! Don't you dare come back here!"

Watch this clip to see the heated exchange:

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.