Glenn Beck: Work Sucks


Why Work Sucks and How to Fix It

GLENN: My daughter and I were talking about this last night.  She said -- in fact, I just, I brought in her letter this morning she wrote me.  I read it again in the car.  She said, "I know that you're a great dad because not only you work really hard but your children are wonderful.  Four wonderful children and each of us love you very much."  She goes on again about how the one thing that, you put the family first and you work hard to do so a couple of times.  And she capitalized "Work hard" in both of those sentences.  I learned that from my dad, and she talked to me about it last night.  She's learning that from me.  You've got to work hard.

Now, I happen to run a different kind of company where, you know, I don't care.  You don't -- I mean, you take vacation and everything else, but you just get your job done and, you know, there's a couple of slugs that were on the tour last week that were like, "I'm tired, I'm not coming in."  Come on, you're tired and you're not coming in?  Please.  However, I don't care.  I'm going -- I mean, I'm going to just hammer them for the rest of their life, but in a comedic way I don't really care.  You got your job done.  You get your job done, do whatever you want.  There's a new book out called Work Sucks and what to do about it.  Tell me if you think in the average workspace this would work.  Now, think of it in the perfect workspace, then think of it in the average workspace and then think of it in the government workspace.  Tell me if you think this would work.  You ready?

Here's some of the suggestions for changing the workplace.  One, employees have the freedom to work any way they want.  See, here's the thing.  In the perfect ideal work space, the people who don't work, they don't work there.  They're fired.  You know what I mean?

Stu, without naming names -- Dan -- there's nobody on our team that doesn't work hard because you don't last long.  I mean, we don't fire people.  I think we fired one person in the last 10 years.  We just don't hire mistakes.  And they would quit if they -- you know, if you just -- because you know what you're getting into.  So we can let everybody just do what they want.  I mean, wouldn't you say that you pretty much, you have the freedom to work any way that you want?

STU:  Yeah.

GLENN:  Yeah.

STU:  Yeah.  I mean, I have to show up for the show.

GLENN:  Now, I think that we've created kind of an ideal workspace or work environment in many ways.  So you have that freedom.  Now imagine that in the average workspace.  Do you think that that could be done?

STU:  Hmmm.  You know, I've always been a strong believer in -- I mean, this goes back to the high school.  I mean, it goes back to the high school days.  Like, why do I have to do homework?  I'm either going to pass the test or not pass the test.

GLENN:  Right.

STU:  You know what I mean?  I've always been a believer in that.  But I mean, I can certainly see that some businesses would have to be harder edge because you don't always have that person.

GLENN:  Yeah.  And you can't fire the bad ones.  You allow me to fire the bad ones, that's fine, I'll do that.  Absolutely because they won't -- you know, you do the job or you get the hell out.  But you can't fire them.  Now imagine if that were the case in government work.  Totally unworkable.  Totally unworkable.

STU:  Yeah.  I mean, because you'd never be able to fire anybody.

GLENN:  Never be able to fire people.

STU:  There would be no consequences.

GLENN:  Now think of this one.  Employees have an unlimited amount of paid time off as long as the work gets done.

STU:  Love that philosophy.

GLENN:  You think that's possible?

STU:  Well, yeah.  I mean, like, for example, in certain industries it's not.  If you have a McDonald's, well, then, no, you need to have it open so people can have the stuff.

GLENN:  Right.

STU:  If you are writing a book, you can certainly have -- as long as your books get done, I don't care if you do it one day, as long as it's great, then you have 364 days off.

GLENN:  In many ways that's the way we work.  I don't know how much vacation time anybody has.  I don't care.  Just get the work done.  You know what I mean?  You take the time off, you take the time off.  Nobody's counting vacations with us.  But there are some businesses where you couldn't do that because you can't get ahead of it.  But then there's the problem of, well, how do you -- if you have that system, how do you keep in touch with anybody?  I mean, it's a very limited amount of people that could do that.

STU:  Well, I mean, the point, though, is that if you can't get in touch with people, then it's not getting the job done.

GLENN:  Yeah.  I guess, I guess.

STU:  Certain businesses are set up that way.

GLENN:  Well, but you have a day off.  Employees should not be overworked.  Please.  Employees should be -- you shouldn't use slave labor.  Well, employees shouldn't be overworked, yes, you're right.  But you know what?  Here's the difference, I think, between success and failure.  There are a lot of people that rise to the level of success, not to their highest abilities but to where they're comfortable.  You know what I mean?  There's a lot of people much more talented than I am but haven't done what I have done because they're not willing to do it.  Not because they're lazy or anything else.  They're just not willing to do it.  There's a lot of people -- I mean, you work -- I'm sure you work with people that, you know, you're driving your car right now and you're like, yeah, Fred.  He's probably better than you, if you are honest about it, he's probably better than you but he is just not willing to do it.  And he's not lazy.  He is just not willing to do it.  He's like, no, my priorities are different.

STU:  Yeah, you get to the point where you're comfortable.  The thing that reminds me of this is when you watch The Biggest Loser and you watch these people who are 550 pounds and they have done nothing in their life but eat Twinkies and they are working out for eight hours a day.  Now, there's no way I believe that I could do that.  Obviously somebody -- there has to be some way that I'm capable of doing it, but because these people, who have done nothing athletically their entire lives are able to go out there and kill themselves day after day after day just because they're motivated by a television show.  You know what I mean?

GLENN:  Yeah, it's what you're motivated by.  Some people are motivated by whatever.  Some people are motivated by money, some people are motivated by, you know, title, some people are motivated by their family, some people are motivated by time off.  I mean, everybody's different.  So whatever -- yeah, what is it you're willing to sacrifice.  Everything is a tradeoff in life.  There is no such thing as a balanced life.  You've got to integrate it.  It's a tradeoff.  You are going to do this?  Well, that means you are going to have to do a little less of this.  So not being overworked, it should be your choice.  Should be your choice.  I agree.  I mean, that's like a -- that really is like no slave labor.  No kidding.  We shouldn't overwork employees?  No.  Really?

Now, I guess some people do but then again, what is the definition of "Overworking"?  Seriously, what is the definition of "Overworking"?  Because some people overworking is not the same definition.  You know what I mean?

STU:  I think you can get to a point -- it's clearly different for everybody, but I think you can get to a point where like maybe it affects your health or, you know, certain things like that.  But it should be -- and another thing is like, you know, pilots have a certain amount of time they shouldn't be flying in a row.  I mean, there are certain lines I'm sure you can find but, you know, overworking is a --

GLENN:  Personal thing.

STU:  Term we don't understand anymore.  Look at the people who built this country.  We weren't working six hour days.  You know, they were building a nation.  I mean, these people were killing themselves every day to get this stuff done.

GLENN:  But you know what?  Those people slept, though.  You know the average sleep back then was like 9 hours?  Those people slept.

STU:  Was it really?

GLENN:  Yeah.  Their average sleep -- well, because they had nothing else to do.  I mean, a lot of people, they had candles but you didn't have books.  You didn't just go to the bookstore and get a book.  So you had to entertain yourself or whatever and it's like, put the kids down, I'm going to bed.  And then you had to get up the next morning at, you know, 6:00 in the morning or 5:00 in the morning and go grow your own food.  Can you imagine?  They worked hard.  They worked hard.  They worked from sun up to sun down.  There's no difference between what they did.  We're a little soft.

STU:  Yeah.

GLENN:  We work hard in different ways.

Every meeting should be optional.  No one would go.  You going to a meeting?  Here's what it should be.  Every meeting -- not optional.  Every meeting should be necessary.  How many meetings do you go to, you're like, "Oh, shut up; it's the same.  We're just such a great team and look how much the company is making, and you guys need to work more.  By the way, sexual harassment in the workplace isn't tolerated.  Here's an attorney.  Listen to him for a while."  Oh, shut up.

STU:  The reason why the office is so successful is because so many people feel like they're (inaudible) every day.

GLENN:  Every day, every day.  You go to those meetings and, oh, such a waste of time.  The meetings shouldn't be optional.  They should just be necessary.  And only the people that should be there should be there.  Everybody else -- look, if you don't get sexual harassment, you're fired.  You know what I mean?  Don't you think things are a little bit more black and white?  We just have to -- we just have to kill all the attorneys (whispering).  That's what we have to do.

"No work schedule should be imposed."  Really?  At McDonald's?

STU:  Some places you need to have business hours.

GLENN:  I mean, I'm going to roll in around noon today.

STU:  I mean, there are roles, though.  Certainly there's roles in probably every company where they don't need to be there the specific hours that the business is operating.  I mean, you know, if you have, you know, someone in a --

GLENN:  As long as your communication is open.

STU:  Yeah.

GLENN:  As long as everybody knows what everybody else is doing, if you are working at all as a team, you know?  But I mean, if you're, you know -- I don't care when you come in.

Here's my favorite.  "There should be no judgment about how you spend your time."  See, here's the thing.  I agree with every single one of these in the libertarian sort of way but this requires a well disciplined group of people.  This requires self-motivating, self-starting kind of people.  When you have that, you can do whatever you want.  It doesn't matter.  Can you imagine these rules in the government?  You'd never, ever have a driver's license.  I think we should put this in for congress because they would never, ever be able to pass another law.  They would get nothing done.  "Hey, who are you to judge how I spend my time.  I was on the golf course but I was thinking."  And you never say, "Look, just don't judge me as long as the job gets done.  Job's done.  Who's not willing to call them right now and go, hey, guys, job's done; take some more time off, just go home.  It's good, we're good."  I'd pay them to sit at home.  I would.  I'd give them a raise if they wouldn't come to Washington.  If, like, nobody was running this country, wouldn't it be sweet?  I used ton afraid of, what happens if there's a transfer of power, what happens if the President, God forbid he has a heart attack?  What happens?  I would welcome the day when, like nobody's in charge, they are all like at the lunch counter.  You know, they are all like, yeah, we forgot, we lost all the maps, we didn't know how to get back to the capitol.  I mean, I don't want tragedy to bring that, but God bless it if the counter just closes and they are all locked inside the lunch counter for about four weeks.  You know what I'm saying?  Stuck on a subway train, wouldn't that be great?  If we could just get all of congress to be stuck in the subway for the rest of eternity.  I think we might have a chance.

Stu.

STU:  Yes.

GLENN:  Throw a cocktail party.  Let's just, let's send invitations that there's going to be a cocktail party on the subway with just nothing but big moneyed lobbyists.

STU:  I like that.  And Eliot Spitzer's hookers.

GLENN:  Hookers.  Yeah, yeah, I like that.

STU:  They will show up for that.

GLENN:  They will show up.  They will show up.

STU:  Then after that, you know, don't worry about it.

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Watch the video clip below to catch more of the conversation, or enjoy the full interview with Dr. Ben Carson here.

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