Blog: Beck '08 Tour Comes to an End

Quick Links: July 17 | June 6-June 11 Tour Blog


Photo Blog... July 18-19

Glenn and his best friend, Pat Gray doing the show from Houston at KSEV 700 AM

Marcus Lutrell and Joe Kerry backstage in Houston. He told us he was late because he had chores to complete on the ranch--what a down-to-earth guy!

Making dreams come true. Bridgette called in and asked to meet Marcus Lutrell and we made it happen in Houston

Glenn had this American Flag custom made for the stage show

Does Glenn look like he's had his fill of having his picture taken? Tour manager, Rich, reviews notes with Glenn

Rich doing one last check before Glenn walks out onstage

Glenn backstage with John Carney

Ticket counter for African-Americans during formal segregation. Boarded-up, a reminder of America's progress and potential.

Many heartfelt thanks to the Boy Scouts!!!!

Glenn backstage with the Boy Scouts in Columbia, South Carolina

Any guesses on where Glenn wanted to stop after the stage show in Columbia, South Carolina?

Photo Blog... July 17

Navy Seal Marcus Lutrell, Glenn Beck and Holly (Marcus' mom) following the show

Stu at KLIF manning the boards...

Adam, still not smiling...

Two massive trucks crammed with computer and satellite technology



Satellite Truck

The Majestic Theater in Dallas

Rich, the tour manager--all business!

Glenn and Jeff, Jeff works with Glenn at CNN Headline News

Inside the technology trucks, I counted over 20 monitors in just one truck!



Glenn and Rich working onstage

Glenn and Stu

Proof that each show is different. Glenn reviewing and changing the notes for the show

Beck '08 Tour Comes to an End


Blogging by Joe Kerry

July 18-19, 2008 (Thursday)

The “Beck 2008 Unelectable Tour” is officially over—and what a great experience it has been!


 


 First, a heartfelt THANK YOU to the Boy Scouts of America from the entire Glenn Beck team. You guys were awesome!


 


 For those who didn’t see the show live or via simulcast, a local Boy Scout troop was asked to help lower and properly fold the massive American flag (see picture) following each stage show. Glenn made it clear that he didn’t want the flag just stuffed into a box at the end of the night after the curtain closed. He wanted the flag to be respected and honored and suggested that the Boy Scouts perform the color guard honors. There were several on the team who were very leery about giving the flag folding responsibility to a group of high school boys but in the end we all agreed to go with Glenn’s suggestion to enlist the Boy Scouts.


 


 In each city I had the opportunity of being on stage while the Boy Scouts lowered and folded the flag and I can tell you that some of the longest applause of the night was when the Boy Scouts presented the flag on stage. It was also tremendous to see the vast majority of the audience rise to their feet and spontaneously begin singing “America the Beautiful”, “The Star Spangled Banner” and other patriotic songs during the flag folding ceremony.


 


 So again, we thank the Boy Scouts for their service!


 


 In Houston it was great to see Glenn and Pat Gray from KSEV 700 AM broadcast together. Imagine what it would be like to go to work and spend the entire day working with your best friend—that’s how it was for Glenn today. Their on-air conversation continued off-air and the off-air conversation continued through lunch, the stage show and eventually ended after our mid-night ice cream snack.


 


 I have to put in a special thank you to Edd Hendee for making our lunch at the Taste of Texas Restaurant something we will never forget (I didn’t know desserts could be made that big) and to Bonny, the station manager at KSEV, who somehow was able to find Fresca in the Republic of Texas!).


 


 Glenn’s in great spirits. He’s worked with Pat all day and Tania has joined Glenn for this leg of the tour—and that just completely changes him. I watch Glenn and Tania together on stage and wonder if Glenn realizes how much he changes when she’s on tour with him. Tania’s focused on finishing a book recommended by her daughter, Twilight by Stephenie Meyer. Tania can’t put the book down. She’s reading it in the plane, car, green room and stage. The Becks deserve each other. They all love to read and I’m convinced that they are physically incapable of putting down a good book.


 


 After Houston we headed to Columbia, South Carolina. We passed a store on the way to the theater, Zesto. It caught Glenn’s attention because they have a giant plastic ice cream cone out front (see picture). As we pass the giant ice cream cone Glenn spontaneously asks John C to make arrangements to have the entire audience, following the show, head over to Zesto’s for ice cream—Glenn’s treat! Tania suggests that it might not be a good idea for several thousand people to show up at a small family owned business at the same time with their cars so those plans are shelved much to Glenn’s disappointment.


 


 Glenn’s performance took place at the Township Auditorium. It’s a theater with lots of history and one in which Glenn has never performed. When Glenn goes to a theater for the first time he really tries to make time to take a tour of the entire building. He asks lots of questions. He wants to know who performed there, the building’s history and always asks about the architecture.


 


 When we arrived at the theater, we all walked through a long hallway to the green room. About two hours later, Glenn approached me and took me to the same hallway that we originally walked down in order to get to the green room. He pointed to an old boarded-up ticket window located deep inside the building (which was something I had passed earlier but failed to notice). Glenn asked that I take several pictures of it (see pictures) and explained that during the era of formal segregation this was the ticket counter that African-Americans were forced to use to purchase their tickets. Glenn had learned this from his tour of the building. The theater, from that moment on, meant something different to him—a man who loves history, encountered a small disquieting piece of it in an older theater in Columbia, South Carolina, and it moved him to silent reflection as he stood there in the hallway trying to re-create in his mind the hurt that was done to innocent individuals’ rights where he stood and how the shuttering of this window was a reflection of America’s progress and potential. All this from just taking the time to ask a question and listen to the answer.


 


 The show runs 14 minutes longer than scheduled. I think Rich won bragging rights—it was Glenn’s longest performance of the tour. I stopped counting the number of impromptu script changes and ad-libs when I felt Glenn and the audience connect. I knew it was going to be a night where Glenn’s message would be tailored to the individuals in that audience that night.


 


 So, there you have it. My first official Glenn Beck Tour has come to an end. What a tremendous experience. It was great meeting so many of you in the various cities and I hope to share more soon.


Glenn Beck's First National Simulcast

Blogging by Joe Kerry

July 17, 2008 (Thursday)

Well, tonight’s the night—the first ever ‘live’ national simulcast by a radio talk show host to over 300 movie theaters. I guess you never know whether you want to be part of history until you know what history has to say about what you were part of—at least that’s what I’m thinking as I’m watching the preparations for tonight’s show take place at the Majestic Theater in Dallas.

But I’m way ahead of myself.

Glenn, Chris, Stu, Rich and Adam flew in last night and arrived at the hotel around 11:00 p.m. John Carney and I flew in the day before. I must have offended Adam or Kristyn at some point in my last blog because on the flight out I didn’t have an aisle or window seat—but was given the middle seat on a long flight.

This morning we were up by 5 a.m. to make it to the studio by 7 a.m. to prepare for the radio show. KLIF has been a tremendous host and is letting us use their studios in addition to making sure that Dallas feels like a home away from home.

The radio show is one of the high points of my day because I really enjoy watching Glenn and Stu interact. If you’re a regular listener you know that it’s rare to see them completely agree on almost any topic. They usually share a general ‘big picture’ view but have strong differing opinions on the ‘fine print’ of many topics. Sometimes they end up on the same page and sometimes they just agree to disagree. What’s truly impressive is that Glenn doesn’t expect Stu to give in just because Glenn’s ‘the boss’ and Stu doesn’t give any ground just because the show bears Glenn’s name. It says a lot about both of them.

It’s a busy news day with stories about the economy, inflation and the price of oil. But Glenn finds the other stories too. The stories about global warming poetry, drilling finally permitted in ANWAR (for ice, not oil) and a San Francisco programmer who is refusing to tell the city the passwords necessary to open up various software programs he designed and installed on city computers.

Following the radio show most of us head directly over to the Majestic Theater. John and I take a taxi from the hotel over to the theater. I give the taxi driver money for the fare. He tells me that he doesn’t have change but that if I give him my cell phone number he’ll get the necessary change, call me and then give the change to me. Well, he has my money and my cell phone number and I don’t even know the name of the taxi cab company let alone a taxi number. John mentions that I’ll probably never see the driver or the money again. I resign myself to that outcome. Twenty minutes later my cell phone rings—it’s the taxi cab driver asking me to meet him at the door as he has my change. I’m so struck by his ‘doing the right thing’ that I tell him to keep the change that was due–and-owing me (or I should say due-and-owing Glenn since this was corporate money) by convincing myself Glenn would have done the same thing.

The first thing I notice at the theater are the two massive trucks parked at the rear entrance along with a satellite truck (see pictures). These trucks are technological marvels. Inside, there are wall to wall television screens, computer equipment and satellite feeds and dishes (see pictures). They trucks look like those you see in a spy movie—just full of computer and monitoring equipment. I hope the pictures capture that.

The trucks are the first tangible sign that things will be different tonight. The second sign is Glenn’s General Manager, Chris, is on site. Each time I see him he’s working his email and phone. I think of him as the Karl Rove of entertainment. Nothing gets by him and no fact, number or piece of data is insignificant or unimportant. He tracks it all and is always incorporating it into the big picture.

Maybe it’s just because I’m new to all of this but no one else on the team appears nervous that tonight’s show is going to be video broadcast nationally ‘live’. I’ve watched the tv show in the studio. I’ve seen the takes, retakes, do-overs and ‘mulligans’. Tonight, there won’t be any do-overs. It’ll be broadcast as it happens and I ask Glenn if that causes any additional anxiety. His response? A simple, “no”.

Inside, I count 6 television cameras placed throughout the theater and at least two dozen people who are working to make sure that the filming and satellite link-up will be flawless. That doesn’t count the people working in the technical and satellite trucks outside. Glenn talks to Stu about his carbon footprint—not to reduce its size, but to make it bigger!

Then I notice something really odd. I notice what appears to be a platoon of Texas secret service agents on the stage, in the stairwell and lobby. They all have the signature earpiece, suit and just have that look—the same one Adam has--it’s the “I can see right through you and melt you with my gaze” look. The reason for all the security? Texas Governor Perry is going to attend the show. Not just do a quick stop-by, but attend the entire show, from beginning to end. Backstage Glenn tells me that Governor Perry is either very brave or has no idea that this show hammers all politicians, regardless of political party. Even when the hammering starts, I see Governor Perry laughing, enjoying the show and being a good sport. I think we need more politicians that can laugh at themselves.

The tour manager, Rich, has done an excellent job juggling all aspects of this production. In the brief handful of minutes that I was able to observe Rich he had to address the following ‘fires’: Glenn’s television earpiece was missing and some were saying it was left in New York, the microphones on the podium needed to be moved in order to accommodate Glenn’s notes, time was running out for a preliminary rehearsal, and guest ticket requests were still coming in. Rich didn’t miss a beat. He tackled each issue and moved on. Sometimes I forget that this wasn’t only a first for Glenn, but Rich too—he’s never had to coordinate a national ‘live’ simulcast—and he did an awesome job, congratulations Rich!

Even with all the excitement of the national broadcast and having the Governor of Texas here, one of the biggest moments of the night was when Marcus Lutrell, a Navy Seal with an incredible inspiring story of valor and service to the members of his Seal Team and country was introduced. The cheering and clapping had a tangible emotional element to it. You could feel the hearts and thank yous of the audience literally being sent from the people to Marcus. People had tears in their eyes. Glenn got a little emotional and there was a brief moment when I wondered if the audience would ever stop clapping and sit down while simultaneously hoping that it wouldn’t end. After the show, I talked to several people around the country who watched this moment in various movie theaters and even though they were hundreds or thousands of miles away, they told me they could feel the power of that moment.

After the show, in the car ride to the airport, we all had our cell phones out and were receiving emails and text messages from fans, friends and family from across the country about the broadcast. People had a good time whether the theater was sold-out, half-full, or had only a handful of people attending. They had fun. They left the theaters feeling inspired.

Dallas you were great! Stu told me earlier in the day that he loves the City of Dallas. After being here a short 24 hours—I have a better understanding of how come he feels that way! Thank you!

(If you watched the show in a theater I’d like to hear from you. Send me an email telling me what you liked, what worked and what didn’t, the audience size, if you felt like you were in Dallas or whatever else you’d like to share. You can write me at joe@glennbeck.com).

Carter Page, a former advisor to Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign, found himself at the center of the Russia probe and had his reputation and career destroyed by what we now know were lies from our own intelligence system and the media.

On the TV show Thursday, Page joined Glenn Beck to speak out about how he became the subject of illegal electronic surveillance by the FBI for more than two years, and revealed the extent of the corruption that has infiltrated our legal systems and our country as a whole.

"To me, the bigger issue is how much damage this has done to our country," Page told Glenn. "I've been very patient in trying to ... find help with finding solutions and correcting this terrible thing which has happened to our country, our judicial system, DOJ, FBI -- these once-great institutions. And my bigger concern is the fact that, although we keep taking these steps forward in terms of these important findings, it really remains the tip of the iceberg."

Page was referencing the report by Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz, which revealed that the FBI made "at least 17 significant errors or omissions" in its Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) applications for warrants to spy on Page, a U.S. citizen.

"I think this needs to be attacked from all angles," Glenn said. "The one angle I'm interested in from you is, please tell me you have the biggest badass attorneys that are hungry, starving, maybe are a little low to pay their Mercedes payments right now, and are just gearing up to come after the government and the media. Are they?"

I can confirm that that is the case," Page replied.

Watch the video clip below for a preview of the full-length interview:

The full interview will air on January 30th for Blaze TV subscribers, and February 1st on YouTube and wherever you get your podcast.

Want to listen to more Glenn Beck podcasts?

Subscribe to Glenn Beck's channel on YouTube for FREE access to more of his masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, or subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

Use code BECK to save $10 on one year of BlazeTV.

On Wednesday's TV show, Glenn Beck sat down with radio show host, author, political commentator, and film critic, Michael Medved.

Michael had an interesting prediction for the 2020 election outcome: a brokered convention by the DNC will usher in former First Lady Michelle Obama to run against President Donald Trump.

Watch the video below to hear why he's making this surprising forecast:

Use code BECK to save $10 on one year of BlazeTV.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

On Thursday's "Glenn Beck Radio Program," BlazeTV's White House correspondent Jon Miller described the current situation in Virginia after Gov. Ralph Northam (D) declared a state of emergency and banned people carrying guns at Capitol Square just days before a pro-Second-Amendment rally scheduled on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Jon told Glenn that Gov. Northam and the Virginia Legislature are "trying to deprive the people of their Second Amendment rights" but the citizens of Virginia are "rising up" to defend their constitutional rights.

"I do think this is the flashpoint," Jon said. "They [Virginia lawmakers] are saying, 'You cannot exercise your rights ... and instead of trying to de-escalate the situation, we are putting pressure. We're trying to escalate it and we're trying to enrage the citizenry even more'."

Glenn noted how Gov. Northam initially blamed the threat of violence from Antifa for his decision to ban weapons but quickly changed his narrative to blame "white supremacists" to vilify the people who are standing up for the Second Amendment and the Constitution.

"What he's doing is, he's making all all the law-abiding citizens of Virginia into white supremacists," Glenn said.

"Sadly, that's exactly right," Jon replied. "And I think he knows exactly what he's doing."

Watch the video to catch more of the conversation below:

Use code BECK to save $10 on one year of BlazeTV.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

Ryan: Trump Louisiana Finale

Photo by Jim Dale

Part One. Part Two. Part Three.

At the end of Trump rallies, I would throw on my Carhartt jacket, sneak out of the press area, then blend in with everyone as they left, filing out through swinging doors.

Often, someone held the door open for me. Just 30 minutes earlier, the same person had most likely had most likely hissed at me for being a journalist. And now they were Sunday smiles and "Oh, yes, thank you, sir" like some redneck concierge.

People flooded out of the arena with the stupidity of a fire drill mishap, desperate to survive.

The air smacked you as soon as you crossed the threshold, back into Louisiana. And the lawn was a wasteland of camping chairs and coolers and shopping bags and to-go containers and soda cans and articles of clothing and even a few tents.

In Monroe, in the dark, the Trump supporters bobbled over mounds of waste like elephants trying to tiptoe. And the trash was as neutral to them as concrete or grass. They plodded over it because it, an object, had somehow gotten in their way.

It did not matter that they were responsible for this wreckage.Out in the sharp-edged moonlight, rally-goers hooted and yapped and boogied and danced, and the bbq food truck was all smoke and paper plates.

They were even more pumped than they had been before the rally, like 6,000 eight year olds who'd been chugging Mountain Dew for hours. Which made Donald Trump the father, the trooper, God of the Underworld, Mr. Elite, Sheriff on high horse, the AR-15 sticker of the family.

Ritualistic mayhem, all at once. And, there in Louisiana, Trump's supporters had gotten a taste of it. They were all so happy. It bordered on rage.

Still, I could not imagine their view of America. Worse, after a day of strange hostilities, I did not care.

My highest priority, my job as a reporter, was to care. To understand them and the world that they inhabit. But I did not give a damn and I never wanted to come back.

Worst of all, I would be back. In less than a week.

Was this how dogs felt on the 4th of July? Hunched in a corner while everyone else gets drunk and launches wailing light into the sky? configurations of blue and red and white.

It was 10:00 p.m. and we'd been traveling since 11:00 a.m., and we still had 5 hours to go and all I wanted was a home, my home, any home, just not here, in the cold sweat of this nowhere. Grey-mangled sky. No evidence of planes or satellites or any proof of modern-day. Just century-old bridges that trains shuffled over one clack at a time.

And casinos, all spangles and neon like the 1960s in Las Vegas. Kitchy and dumb, too tacky for lighthearted gambling. And only in the nicer cities, like Shreveport, which is not nice at all.

And swamp. Black water that rarely shimmered. Inhabited by gadflies and leeches and not one single fish that was pretty.

Full of alligators, and other killing types. The storks gnawing on frogs, the vultures never hungry. The coyotes with nobody to stop them and so much land to themselves. The roaches in the wild, like tiny wildebeests.

Then, the occasional deer carcass on the side of the road, eyes splayed as if distracted, tongue out, relaxed but empty. The diseased willows like skeletons in hairnets. The owls that never quit staring. A million facets of wilderness that would outlive us all.

Because Nature has poise. It thrives and is original.

Because silence is impossible. Even in an anechoic chamber, perfectly soundproofed, you can hear your own heartbeat, steady as a drum. A never-ending war.

I put "Headache" by Grouper on repeat as we glided west. We were deadlocked to asphalt, rubber over tarface.

And I thought about lines from a Rita Dove poem titled "I have been a stranger in a strange land"

He was off cataloging the universe, probably,
pretending he could organize
what was clearly someone else's chaos.

Wasn't that exactly what I was doing? Looking for an impossible answer, examining every single accident, eager for meaning? telling myself, "If it happens and matters the next year, in America, I want to be there, or to know what it means. I owe it to whoever cares to listen."

Humans are collectors and I had gone overboard.

Because maybe this wasn't even my home. These landmarks, what did they mean? Was I obvious here? When I smiled, did I trick them into believing that I felt some vague sense of approval? Or did my expressions betray me?

Out in all that garbage-streaked emptiness — despite the occasional burst of passing halogen — I couldn't tell if everything we encountered was haunted or just old, derelict, broken, useless. One never-ending landfill.

Around those parts, they'd made everything into junk. Homes. Roads. Glass. Nature. Life itself, they made into junk.

I cringed as we passed yet another deer carcass mounded on the side of the road.

As written in Job 35:11,

Who teaches us more than the beasts of the earth and makes us wiser than the birds in the sky?

Nobody. Look at nature and you feel something powerful. Look at an animal, in all of its untamable majesty, and you capture a deep love, all swept up in the power of creation. But, here, all I saw were poor creatures who people had slammed into and kept driving. Driving to where? For what reason? What exactly was so important that they left a trail of dead animals behind them?

So I crossed myself dolorously and said an "Our Father" and recited a stanza from Charles Bukowski's "The Laughing Heart"

you can't beat death but
you can beat death in life, sometimes.
and the more often you learn to do it,
the more light there will be.

Out here, nothing but darkness. Needing some light, by God. Give me something better than a Moon that hides like an underfed coward.

Jade told me about some of the more traumatic things she'd seen while working at the State Fair.

"Bro, they pull roaches out of the iced lemonade jugs and act like nothing happened."

"All right but what about the corn dogs?"

"You do not want to know, little bro."

She looked around in the quiet. "Back in the day, the Louisiana Congress refused to raise the drinking age from 18 to 21," she said. "They didn't want to lose all that drunk gambler money. So the federal government cut off funding to highways."

We glided through moon-pale landscape for an hour before I realized what she had meant. That there weren't any light poles or billboards along the road. Nothing to guide us or distract us. Just us, alone. And it felt like outer space had collapsed, swallowed us like jellybeans.

Like two teenagers playing a prank on the universe.

In the cozy Subaru Crosstrek, in the old wild night, brimming with the uncertainty of life and the nonchalance of failure, we paraded ourselves back to Dallas. Alive in the river silence that follows us everywhere.

New installments come Mondays and Thursdays. Next, the Iowa caucuses. Check out my Twitter. Email me at kryan@blazemedia.com