Where were our Marines?




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Where were our Marines?

I don't mean that in a literal sense; I know the Navy had a ship on the way to the area. I mean it in the sense that we've become so politically correct that no one would even dare think about sending Marines to fight pirates.

"Pirates? What? Don't they just sing songs and put parrots on their shoulders?"

No.

In fact, a more accurate name for pirates is something you're probably a little more familiar with: terrorists.

We also shouldn't sugarcoat the fact that paying ransom to these pirates is not only negotiating with terrorists, but it's also funding real, future attacks. And no, not the kind with long swords and short planks, the kind with AK-47s and RPGs.

For example, last year, pirates seized a Saudi supertanker loaded with a $100 million in crude oil. After being held for nearly two months, the Sirius Star and its 25 crew members were freed after $3 million in ransom magically parachuted onto the deck.

Turns out that people do negotiate with terrorists after all.

So what does ransom paid near Africa have to do with us? Easy, follow the money trail. Most terrorism experts agree that most terrorist attacks can't succeeded without a source of funding-and that includes 9/11.

There have now been nearly 400 pirate attacks off the coast of Somalia since 2008. Almost 200 people have been killed in these attacks over the last decade, with another 200 missing, 600 injured and 3,000 taken hostage.

Which brings me to the United States Marines.

You may have heard the hymn: "From the halls of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli." But you probably don't know where it comes from. Tripoli — today's Libya — is where the U.S. fought its first foreign war and where the U.S. Marines were baptized by fire.

It was late in the 18th century and as much as one out of every $5 in U.S. revenue was being paid out in ransom to Barbary raiders, who engaged in theft, extortion, hijacking and slavery.

In 1801, just days after his inauguration as the third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson — who famously said "one war, such as that of our revolution, is enough for one life" — would not tolerate any more blackmail from the pirates. He tried to build an international coalition but, surprise, surprise, no one else was interested.

So Jefferson — realizing that America would never truly be free if it cowered to terrorists — dispatched the Marines.

Those Marines fought bravely against Islamic terrorists for 14 years far from home and as far as I know it was never described as a quagmire or a lost cause.

Their sacrifice was embodied in the Tripoli Monument, which was once in Washington, D.C., but is now — for all you conspiracy theorists in the audience — hidden in Annapolis.

There is no shame in admitting that our enemies today are much like our enemies back then: Barbaric Islamic terrorists who despise everything we stand for. But there is plenty of shame in skirting our responsibilities and backing down from the fight. That's why it's time these modern-day pirates meet the same people who ended the tyranny of their predecessors: the few, the proud, the United States Marines.

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The American Journey Experience is the new home of the car Orson Welles gave to Rita Hayworth. Orson Welles gave this car to his future wife Rita Hayworth for her 24th birthday.

George Orson Welles was an American actor, director, producer, and screenwriter who is remembered for his innovative and influential work in film, radio and theatre. He is considered to be among the greatest and most influential filmmakers of all time and his work has had a great impact on American culture.

Every year as Thanksgiving approaches, the fear of politics being brought up at the dinner table is shared by millions around the country. But comedian Jamie Kilstein has a guide for what you should do to avoid the awkward political turmoil so you can enjoy stuffing your face full of turkey.

Kilstein joined "The Glenn Beck Program" to dissect exactly how you can handle those awkward, news-related discussions around the table on Thanksgiving and provided his 3-step guide to help you survive the holidays with your favorite, liberal relatives: Find common ground, don’t take obvious bait, and remember that winning an argument at the cost of a family member won’t fix the issue you’re arguing about.

Watch the video clip below. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

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On the latest episode of "The Glenn Beck Podcast," Winston opened up about the entire scandal, what he discovered in the wake of his cancellation, and why he's decided to put truth over career.

"I looked deeper and deeper into the topic, and I realized I hadn't been wrong [when] I'd called the author brave," Winston said of Ngo. "Not only was he brave, he'd been attacked by Antifa mobs in Oregon, and he was then attacked again ... he's unquestionably brave. And so my conscience really started to bother me ... I felt like I was in some way excusing the behavior of Antifa by apologizing for criticizing it. Which then made me feel, well, then I'm as bad as the problem because I'm sort of agreeing that it doesn't exist," he added.

"Another point, by the way, that I found it very frustrating, was that that left-wing media in this country and in my country don't even talk about [Antifa]. We can all see this footage. We see it online," Winston continued. "But they don't talk about it, and that's part of my, I think, interest initially in tweeting about Andy's book. Because I think people need to see what's going on, and it's a blind spot there. ... CNN and MSNBC, they don't cover it. Biden in his presidential election said it was just 'an idea' that didn't exist. I mean, did he not see the courthouse in Oregon being burnt down?"

Watch the video clip below or find the full podcast with Winston Marshall here.


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