Glenn Beck: Ma'am!! Boxer not offended this time



Glenn Beck's Common Sense


Available in book stores nationwide...

GLENN: So let's go to Pat's audio vault. Pat, what are you bringing to the table with the audio today?

PAT: Barbara Boxer, having a little hearing yesterday.

GLENN: Everybody's favorite.

PAT: Some sort of small business or environmental hearing, who knows. They are having a hearing on something every day. And she was in this environmental hearing with Harry Alford who was the head the CEO at the black Chamber of Commerce. And they had an interesting little exchange that Harry took exception with.

GLENN: Okay. Here it is, Barbara Boxer.

BOXER: Also, if that isn't interesting to you, we'll quote John Grant who is the CEO of 100 Black Men of Atlanta. Quote: Clean energy is the key that will unlock millions of jobs and the NAACP's support is vital to ensuring that those jobs help to rebuild urban areas. So clearly there's a diversity

VOICE: Madam chair, that is condescending to me. I'm the National Black Chamber of Commerce and you are trying to put up some other black group to pit against me.

BOXER: If this gentleman, if this gentleman were here, he would be proud that he was being quoted just as he

VOICE: He should have been invited.

GLENN: Stop, stop, stop, stop. He would have been proud that he was quoted, that a white senator was quoting him in congress. He would have been proud. Oh, my gosh, I think that's condescending.

PAT: It is. It is.

GLENN: Unbelievable.

PAT: That part, that part is. That's the one part that struck me as you know, otherwise this is liberals eating their young.

GLENN: Yeah.

PAT: Just, they are feeding on each other and I love it when that happens.

GLENN: Oh, yeah. It is kind of yummy.

PAT: But that part, where he would be proud, you should be proud. You black guys should be proud that I

GLENN: You cute little black guy.

PAT: You're cute. Look at that. I'm holding this black guy up and saying, "He's smart."

PAT: Yeah. Look.

GLENN: Yeah.

PAT: Unbelievable.

GLENN: That is offensive. There's more.

BOXER: Should be proud

VOICE: It is condescending to me.

PAT: Just so you know, he would be proud that you were here. He's proud, I'm sure.

VOICE: Proud. That's condescending and I don't like it. It's racial. I don't like it.

BOXER: Excuse me, sir.

VOICE: I take offense to it.

BOXER: Okay.

VOICE: As an African American and a veteran of this country, I take offense to that.

BOXER: Offense at the fact that I would quote

VOICE: You are quoting some other black man. Why don't you quote some other Asian or some I mean, you are being racial here.

BOXER: Okay, let me

VOICE: And I think you are getting to a path here that's going to explode.

BOXER: I'm going to respond right now. I'm going to ask everyone to listen to what I said.

GLENN: Okay.

BOXER: First I placed in the record the Pew Charitable Trust study. Very important study our state, our home State of California. Then I wanted to make a point that the fact is there's definitely differing opinions in the black community just as there are in my community.

VOICE: You are speaking on behalf of the black community?

BOXER: No. I am putting in the word a statement by the NAACP.

VOICE: Why?

BOXER: Because I think it is quite relevant. I

VOICE: Then understand the Pew I understand the Pew study but why are you doing the NAA why are you doing the colored people association study with the black Chamber of Commerce?

BOXER: I am trying to show the diversity of support that we have.

VOICE: Diversity?

BOXER: And I will go ahead and give that diversity of support. The oil companies

PAT: Is that great?

GLENN: That's unbelievable.

PAT: It's priceless.

GLENN: Then she goes into the oil companies. What color is oil?

PAT: Black.

GLENN: Yes. I think we all know what you're saying, little miss racist.

STU: That is the treatment that Democrats, people like Barbara Boxer give to anyone on the right when they say anything. She just got it back at herself.

GLENN: And she didn't she doesn't have any idea. She was like, wait, wait, wait, wait, this is friendly; I'm just trying to say... and she really didn't even notice the racism. Where is the diversity of opinion? The black Chamber of Commerce versus the NAACP?

PAT: Both sides of the issue!

GLENN: Both sides of the issue and they are both black. I agree with him, why are you bringing that up? Why are you bringing up the NAACP?

STU: It's just, that's an odd do we know what his actual opinion was on this?

GLENN: Does it matter? It's Friday. We're enjoying cake here for a second.

STU: That's a good point. Just enjoy Barbara Boxer getting yelled at.

GLENN: Yeah. Oh, by the way, speaking of that, did you notice how many times he said "Ma'am"?

STU: I did not. Did he say ma'am?

GLENN: Did you notice that?

PAT: Several times.

GLENN: Do you happen to have those?

GLENN: Okay, hang on. Here we go.

PAT: Here's some of the ma'ams.

VOICE: That's correct, ma'am, it's all in the manual. Yes, ma'am.

GLENN: Four ma'ams. Do you happen to have the audio of last time somebody said ma'am?

VOICE: Well, why has it been delayed?

VOICE: Ma'am, at the LACPR is

BOXER: You know, do a favor. Could you say senator instead of ma'am? I worked so hard to get that title. So I appreciate it, thank you.

PAT: It's just a thing. She worked so hard to get that title. About you when Harry Alford yesterday called her ma'am four times within about 30 seconds, she didn't stop him.

GLENN: She didn't have a problem with that because she doesn't have a problem with being called ma'am. She has a problem being called ma'am by somebody in a military uniform.

PAT: By a general.

GLENN: Yeah. She has a problem. It wasn't about that to me just shows her contempt for the military.

STU: Well, are you sure that she just wasn't distracted by being called a racist as well or by being called condescending or whatever that exchange was about?

GLENN: I don't know what it was. Let's listen to it again.

STU: Yeah, one more time, one more time. Playing the hitch here. It is that good, it is that good.

BOXER: Also, if that isn't interesting to you, we'll quote John Grant, who is the CEO of 100 Black Men of Atlanta. Quote: Clean energy is the key that will unlock millions of jobs and the NAACP support is vital to ensuring that those jobs help to rebuild urban areas. So clearly there's a diversity

VOICE: Madam chair, that is condescending to me.

BOXER: Well

VOICE: I'm the National Black Chamber of Commerce and you are trying to put up some other black group to pit against me.

BOXER: If this gentleman, if this gentleman were here, he would be proud that he was being quoted just as he

VOICE: He should have been invited.

BOXER: Just as he would be proud.

VOICE: It is condescending to me.

BOXER: Just so you know, he would be proud that you were here. He's proud

GLENN: Stop, stop, stop, stop. What's this guy's name?

PAT: Harry Alford.

GLENN: Let's call no, the other guy who's supposed to be proud if he were here.

PAT: Oh, the guy?

STU: John Grant or something?

GLENN: John Grant, can we get a hold of John Grant? Let's find out if he was proud.

STU: That he was quoted?

GLENN: That he was proud of Barbara Boxer. Does it make him proud? Was he from the NAACP?

PAT: Yeah.

STU: I thought that was the 100 Black Men.

GLENN: I think we should listen to it again.

STU: You are right.

GLENN: Let's just listen to it again. Start from the beginning.

BOXER: Also if that isn't interesting to you, we'll quote John Grant who is the CEO of 100 Black Men of Atlanta. Quote: Clean energy is the key that will unlock millions of jobs and the NAACP's support is vital to ensuring that those jobs help to rebuild urban areas. So clearly there's a diversity

VOICE: Madam chair, that is condescending to me.

BOXER: Well

VOICE: I'm the National Black Chamber of Commerce and you are trying to put up some other black group to pit against me.

BOXER: If this gentleman, if this gentleman were here, he would be proud that he was being quoted just as he

VOICE: He should have been invited.

BOXER: Just as he would be proud

VOICE: It is condescending to me.

BOXER: Just so you know, he would be proud that you were here. He's proud, I'm sure.

PAT: I'm also glad that she can speak for him.

GLENN: I am, too.

PAT: That is great because she knows.

GLENN: Well, sometimes blacks can't speak for themselves.

STU: If they are not invited, they can't.

PAT: But when they do, they are very proud.

GLENN: Is this the name of a company?

PAT: 100 Black Men.

STU: 100 Black Men of Atlanta.

GLENN: Is that the name of the company or like, I didn't even take time to look up the name, there's 100 Black Men that work together and he is the CEO of them?

STU: That's possible but they would be proud.

GLENN: They would be proud. Is that the name of your company? No, it's I do have 100 Black Men working with me.

PAT: I hope that's true. I hope that's what it is.

STU: It does appear to be 100 Black Men of Atlanta, Inc.

GLENN: What is it?

STU: Let's see if I can

GLENN: What do they do?

STU: I don't know.

GLENN: I mean, that's not like okay, for instance, Jiffy Lube, what does it do?

STU: It lubes cars.

GLENN: Lubes cars.

STU: In a jiffy.

GLENN: In a Jiffy Lube, you get it. So if you are going in and you think I need to get my car lubed, you know where you are going in the Yellow Pages. I don't know what 100 Black Men is. It's not something that you normally say, gee, if I only had 100 Black Men.

STU: I have their mission statement here.

GLENN: What is their mission statement here?

STU: The mission of the 100 Black Men of Atlanta, incorporated is provide support and improve the quality of African Americans and youth in particular in the Atlanta community. In this statement we affirm that we will serve as role models of our youth that's number one. Number two, we will become that will assist charitable and other worthwhile community causes

GLENN: I like these guys.

STU: Number three, we will give our time, talent and resources back to the Atlanta community. Number four, we will provide the leadership to support issues and causes that promote positive change, change in our community. And number five, we will demand and demonstrate excellence in all of our endeavors.

GLENN: They sound proud.

STU: They do sound like they would be proud.

GLENN: Because if they lived by all of those things, they would have reason to be proud.

STU: Yeah, absolutely.

GLENN: So are there more than 100?

STU: I can

GLENN: Is that just the name?

STU: I can get a history on that. There is a history button.

GLENN: Okay, go ahead. Hit the history because I'd like to know if there are more. I'm hoping that there are more than 100.

STU: Okay.

GLENN: Unless they are not living by those standards.

STU: Well, no, there seems to be okay. Here we go. There seems to be about 100 chapters of 100 Black Men.

GLENN: So that's 1,000 black men.

STU: No, it's 10,000 black men.

GLENN: Oh, yeah, 10,000, wow.

STU: In 1986, 18 of his friends and associates so at one point it was 19 black men of Atlanta.

GLENN: And that was 1886?

STU: 1986. They wanted to share the vision of a community empowerment organization that would focus on Atlanta's underprivileged youth. Goldstein who is the guy who started it had been exposed to a similar concept during a business meeting in New York called 100 Black Men of New York, aptly titled the new name, 100 Black Men of Atlanta. So he just

GLENN: That's good.

STU: That's pretty good. Think about it.

GLENN: It works. You wouldn't want 100 Black Men of New York in Atlanta.

STU: That wouldn't make any sense at all.

GLENN: Or 100 Black Men of Atlanta in New York.

STU: Right. Those wouldn't make those would be completely ridiculous.

PAT: You could go with the 100 Black Men of New York, the Atlanta chapter, though.

STU: Right, about you that was really

GLENN: But it would be confusing. Now think you are in the Yellow Pages and you are like, if I just had 100 Black Men.

PAT: Right.

GLENN: And then you are like, well, I don't know if I need them to be New Yorkers, you know.

STU: It's kind of like the Los Angeles angels of Anaheim. It's too long.

GLENN: It is, it is.

STU: Let's see. 100 Black Men of Atlanta is now one of 8

GLENN: I really don't care. Can we call what's his name?

STU: But I was going to tell you, 100 Black Men of Atlanta is one of eight 100 Black Men in cities around the nation. So now we're up to 10,000 men.

GLENN: That's great. I don't know what they do. It was things that sounds good on the surface. Do you have to be black to be in the 100 Black Men? Could you be white? Because I think if you had an organization called 100 White Men

PAT: And you did not allow blacks...

GLENN: Of Atlanta, it might be easier just to look it up in the yellow pages under Klans.

STU: Yeah, 100 white, that would not be good. And it would be odd to have

GLENN: 100 Black Men

STU: It seems like it would be

GLENN: 2 1/2 men or 2 1/2 kids or whatever it is.

STU: That is the name of a show, yes, thank you.

GLENN: Why not, 100 Black Men and a white guy. But that does sound more like a stage show. That's kind of like a show of some sort.

STU: You know

GLENN: You know, a comedy troup: Hey, I was just out this weekend. I saw, have you seen 100 Black Men and a White Guy?

STU: Does sound like a Broadway sort of scenario.

GLENN: It does, it does. So could we call the CEO?

STU: John Grant, CEO.

GLENN: I'll do a commercial and you call him real quick.

If you would like to hear the rest sign up to become an Insider today!

The far left is tearing apart the social fabric of our country in the name of "progress." From its emphasis on government dependency, to the $15 minimum wage, to the embrace of Marxist Critical Race Theory in our schools, the Left is destroying our culture and way of life.

On Glenn TV this week, Glenn Beck spoke with Christopher Rufo, director of the Center on Wealth and Poverty, about the latest insane example of the Marxist lies destroying the minds of our kids: A New York school sent parents a "white identities" chart advocating for "white traitors" and "white abolitionists."

Watch the video clip below or find the full episode here:

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

There is an all-out assault on the social fabric of our country. The kids are NOT all right. In the name of "progress," we're destroying their minds with Marxist lies. In the name of "safety," we're destroying their souls by keeping them locked down.

On his Glenn TV special this week, Glenn Beck takes on the national suicide that the Left is committing by destroying our culture and way of life and how it's also leading to actual suicide of our kids. Experts on the front lines expose how the lies of critical race theory are crippling our children's future and provide tools for parents to fight back.

Finally, Glenn hears from a parent who tragically lost his teen son, who took his own life due to COVID isolation. He has a powerful message for parents, teachers, and politicians who he says are failing our kids.

Watch the special in full below:

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

With as much gas and oil as Texas has — and not to mention its own power grid — why in the world is Texas experiencing such bad power outages?

Center for Industrial Progress president and founder Alex Epstein joined "The Glenn Beck Radio Program" to lay out what he's found.

Alex said he believes the "fundamental" problem is "the insistence on using unreliable wind and solar energy instead of reliable energy from coal, nuclear, and natural gas." And soon, it may not be just Texas, as President Joe Biden pushes for 100% dependency on green energy nationwide. THAT is the "real lesson of Texas," he warned.

Watch the video below to catch more of the conversation:

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

Disney actress Gina Carano was just the latest to be canceled for being vocally conservative — this time for making a Holocaust comparison. But on this week's episode of "The Glenn Beck Podcast," renowned Jewish historian Edwin Black explains how Gina's comparison wasn't exactly out of line: The second phase of the Holocaust, exclusion, "is like cancel culture."

Edwin Black is the son of Holocaust survivors and an investigative journalist with awards and best-selling books translated into 20 languages in nearly 200 countries. His book "IBM and the Holocaust" examines high tech's role in killing Jews during the Holocaust and what it can teach us about the dangers of Big Tech today.

Edwin has spent enough time in the media to see all of its warts (there are a lot). And he's speaking out about it and its role in ignoring history at our nation's peril. He told Glenn he believes our culture and our history are being erased. Our ideals are being censored and our values are being mocked.

Watch the video clip below to catch more of the conversation, or enjoy the full interview with Edwin Black here.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.