The Road to Serfdom




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I want to start in 1945. The guns had finally drawn silent in Western Europe. The bombs had stopped falling. The skies above were no longer filled with the scream of fighter planes. The invasions and battles were no more. The Allied forces had won, and World War II was over. But this was far from the end. Another, perhaps even more important war, was just beginning. Europe was decimated both politically and structurally and faced the daunting task of starting over from scratch.

America had just come off a Great Depression many believed was caused by the evil, greedy capitalist system. The question that loomed largest over many countries around the entire globe: What do we do from here? Should we risk another economic collapse, or should we let government control the economy?

The eventual deciding factor in the 'war after the war' came from a very unlikely source: A little known economist, originally from Vienna, named Friedrich A. Hayek. We are in a similar war today, but if you don't know history, you probably aren't even aware of it.

Starting in the early 1940's, Hayek began writing a little book called "The Road to Serfdom." The book clearly and logically explained how any form of central government planning eventually leads to serfdom (or servitude) and extinguishes freedom. He didn't think he would gain any notoriety or fortune from the book, in fact, it was quite the opposite. Material like this was banned in Germany and elsewhere. He was only writing it because he considered it "a duty which I must not evade." See, there was a real possibility that Europe and even America would move in that direction. After all, England had been in with the Fabian socialists.

Who were the Fabian socialists? People like George Bernard Shaw, who we showed you in our documentary, "The Revolutionary Holocaust." He was a Fabian socialist, give you a little taste of what they believed. Here he is:

(BEGIN CLIP)

GEORGE BERNARD SHAW: I don't want to punish anybody. But there are an extraordinary number of people whom i want to kill… but it must be evident to all of you… you must all know half a dozen people at least who are of no use in this world… who are more trouble than they are worth.

(END CLIP)

Hayek couldn't live with himself if he didn't write what he was thinking. He initially wrote the book for the Brits, because he could see who they were in bed with. He could see the road they were traveling down. He had no earthly idea it would take off like it did. And boy, did it take off. After initially not being able to find a publisher, the first printing of 2,000 copies was exhausted instantly, and within six months more than 30,000 books were sold. American publishers were skeptical. They didn't think it'd work. Ironically, they tried to get progressive icon Walter Lippman to do the foreword for the book, noting that it'd sell thousands if he did, maybe 900 if he didn't. Lippman wasn't able to write it.

The book went through six impressions in the first 16 months, was translated into numerous foreign languages, and circulated both openly in the free world and underground in the emerging iron curtain. It absolutely took off after Reader's Digest published a condensed version of the book in 1945. The Reader's Digest had a circulation at the time of more the 5 million copies, and the little journal was provided to each American serviceman, at home and abroad.

What did people so love about this book? People understood it — Hayek's claims such as: "Man does not and cannot know everything, and when he acts as if he does, disaster follows," make good, common sense. Hayek explained that capitalism is the only system of economics compatible with human dignity, prosperity, and liberty. He demonstrated that planned economies that tried to control the nature of man through administrative rules was impossible, and could only lead to one outcome: Serfdom.

And the message spread like a ripple on a pond. Soon, terms like "collectivism" were erased from political debate, and anyone defending government central planning was discredited.

This book was like a Mike Tyson (in his prime) right hook to socialism in Western Europe and in the United States. But its influence didn't stop there. It has inspired political and economic leaders for decades since — most famously Ronald Reagan. Reagan often praised Hayek when he talked about people waking up to the dangers of big government. That brings us to today.

We were on the right track, but clearly we've fallen off the wagon. A few years ago I started asking, how'd we get here? How did this happen to us? No one had answers. I started reading history, and it didn't take long for me to realize that we'd completely disconnected ourselves from history, making us incredibly vulnerable to repeating the mistakes of the past. And look at what we're doing! We have a government car company, government banks, we're talking about government oil companies, government is hiring all the workers. We are there, gang! And as Hayek so clearly demonstrated, this road only leads to one destination.

I have to admit, the first time I saw this book I made fun of it. I've read the roots of modern liberalism by Woodrow Wilson — that's enough to want to make you hang yourself — I wasn't about to put myself through the "Road to Serfdom." But there's a reason this book was banned in places like Germany and the Soviet Union.

I'm about to talk to someone who lived this. He read this book at the risk of seven years in prison. If you were caught giving this book out you'd get 12 years hard labor — a certain death sentence. Why didn't they want people to read it? They know if the people caught on to what these tyrants were doing, it'd be over.

Now, we're not banning books and dishing out hard labor sentences, but I want to show you something we are doing that to me is pretty shocking. Here's a publisher selling copies of the Constitution. But look at what comes along with it: "This book is a product of its time and does not reflect the same values as it would if it were written today...Parents might wish to discuss with their children how views on race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and interpersonal relations have changed since this book was written before allowing them to read this classic work."

There's a war for the future of this country. It's being waged right now. The questions of the future can always be answered with the information, glories, and mistakes of the past. Let's give you the other option today — besides capitalism is bad, let's go on to global governance and control through a giant progressive monolith. If you don't learn the things no one is willing to teach today… there will be more than a disclaimer on the Constitution.

— Watch Glenn Beck weekdays at 5p & 2a ET on Fox News Channel

TRUMP: The twilight hour of socialism has arrived

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The other day, at Florida International University in Miami, facing large American and Venezuelan flags, President Trump gave a rousing speech in Miami, including this line, the "twilight hour of socialism has arrived."

Trump went on to say:

Socialism is about one thing only—power for the ruling class. They want the power to decide who wins and who loses, who's up and who's down…and even who lives and who dies.

He then repeated a phrase that helped define his State of the Union address this year:

America will never be a socialist country.

Fittingly, Fox News posted an article yesterday exposing the overlooked evils of Che dangers of socialism that all too often disappear behind a flashy design on a t-shirt.

  1. Guevara said he killed people without regard to guilt or innocence. In an interview, Guevara said, "in times of excessive tension we cannot proceed weakly. At the Sierra Maestra, we executed many people by firing squad without knowing if they were fully guilty. At times, the Revolution cannot stop to conduct much investigation; it has the obligation to triumph."
  2. Humberto Fontova, author of "Exposing the Real Che Guevara," told Fox that Guevara created system that put gay people in labor camps. "The regime that Che Guevara co-founded is the only one in modern history in the Western Hemisphere to have herded gays into forced labor camps."
  3. Guevara opposed a free press: "In 1959, leftist journalist José Pardo Llada reported that Guevara told him: 'We must eliminate all newspapers; we cannot make a revolution with free press. Newspapers are instruments of the oligarchy.'"
  4. Guevara made racist statements: Guevara went on to write: "the black is indolent and a dreamer; spending his meager wage on frivolity or drink; the European has a tradition of work and saving."

These are just some of the many historical examples of the failure of socialism. President Trump is right. If the frivolities of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Bernie Saunders catch on and spread, we could have an unbelievable problem on our hands.

Poor Jussie: His narrative is falling apart completely

Tasia Wells/Getty Images for Espolòn

Here's how the media works now: Find a story that confirms their narrative, run it constantly and relentlessly. When the real story comes out, minimize exposure of the correction. Repeat.

We're seeing this pattern play out over and over again.

RELATED: John Ziegler isn't buying what Jussie Smollett's selling either

Here are some of the knee-jerk reactions that the media had to this Jessie Smollett hoax, from Insider Edition, CNN, E! News, Headline News, CNBC, TMZ, to name a few:


Montage: Watch the Media Uncritically Accept Another Outlandish 'Hate Crime' youtu.be


And those are just the reactions on TV. It was just as bad, at times worse, in print and online. I'll give you one special example, however. Because, you know the situation is bad when TMZ is connecting the dots and seeing through this guy's story:

The sources say there were red flags from the get go. Cops were extremely suspicious when Jussie took them out to the area where he said he was attacked and pointed to an obscure camera saying how happy he was that the attack was on video. Turns out the camera was pointing in the wrong direction. Cops thought it was weird he knew the location of that camera. And there's this. We're told investigators didn't believe the 2 alleged attackers screamed 'This is MAGA country' because 'Not a single Trump supporter watches 'Empire.''

Here's the man himself, in an interview just days after the alleged beating…I'm sorry, the alleged "modern day lynching." Here he is in an interview with ABC News, complaining about people making up stuff:



Strong words, spoken by a man who, allegedly, created the whole narrative to begin with.

This compromise is an abomination

Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Three decades ago, "The Art of the Deal" made Donald Trump a household name. A lot has happened since then. But you can trace many of Trump's actions back to that book.

Art of the Deal:

In the end, you're measured not by how much you undertake but by what you finally accomplish.

People laughed when he announced that he was running for President. And I mean that literally. Remember the 2011 White House Correspondents' Dinner when Obama roasted Trump, viciously, mocking the very idea that Trump could ever be President. Now, he's President.

You can't con people, at least not for long. You can create excitement, you can do wonderful promotion and get all kinds of press, and you can throw in a little hyperbole. But if you don't deliver the goods, people will eventually catch on.

This empire-building is a mark of Trump.

RELATED: 'Arrogant fool' Jim Acosta exposed MSM's dishonest border agenda — again.

The most recent example is the border wall. Yesterday, congress reached a compromise on funding for the border wall. Weeks of tense back-and-forth built up to that moment. At times, it seemed like neither side would budge. Trump stuck to his guns, the government shut down, Trump refused to budge, then, miraculously, the lights came back on again. The result was a compromise. Or at least that's how it appeared.

But really, Trump got what he wanted -- exactly what he wanted. He used the techniques he wrote about in The Art of the Deal:

My style of deal-making is quite simple and straightforward. I aim very high, and then I just keep pushing and pushing and pushing to get what I'm after.

From the start, he demanded $5.7 billion for construction of a border wall. It was a months' long tug-of-war that eventually resulted in yesterday's legislation, which would dedicate $1.4 billion. It would appear that that was what he was after all along. Moments before the vote, he did some last-minute pushing. A national emergency declaration, and suddenly the number is $8 billion.

Art of the Deal:

People think I'm a gambler. I've never gambled in my life. To me, a gambler is someone who plays slot machines. I prefer to own slot machines. It's a very good business being the house.

In a rare show of bipartisanship, Senate passed the legislation 83-16, and the House followed with 300-128. Today, Trump will sign the bill.

It's not even fair to call that a deal, really. A deal is what happens when you go to a car dealership, fully ready to buy a car, and the salesman says the right things. What Trump did is more like a car dealer selling an entire row of cars to someone who doesn't even have a licence. When Trump started, Democrats wouldn't even consider a wall, let alone pay for it.

Art of the Deal:

The final key to the way I promote is bravado. I play to people's fantasies. People may not always think big themselves, but they can still get very excited by those who do. That's why a little hyperbole never hurts. People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular. I call it truthful hyperbole. It's an innocent form of exaggeration—and a very effective form of promotion.

He started the wall on a chant, "Build the wall!" until he got what he wanted. He maneuvered like Don Draper, selling people something that they didn't even know they wanted, and convincing them that it is exactly what they've always needed.