What's missing?



The Faculty Club


By Danny Tobey

By Danny Tobey

The Faculty Club is a book about values.  Sure, it’s a book about secret societies, Ivy League intrigue, and ancient riddles.  But those are really just symbols for something much more important: how our next generation of leaders comes of age.  And how they become the flawed adults they are.

I’m writing this because I saw Glenn on TV talking about how our political leaders have lost their way.  Right and left, Democratic and Republican, something vital is missing.  We all feel it.  And we want it back.

Jeremy Davis is the broken hero of The Faculty Club.  Like me, he’s a public school kid from Texas who worked hard and ended up at an Ivy League school.  And like me, he found himself surrounded by beautiful, fascinating people, nursing an inferiority complex and an overwhelming desire to make it. 

Jeremy loses his way.  Not because he’s a bad guy, but because he wants to succeed so badly that he stops caring what it takes to get there.

I learned about virtue at Harvard, one night that was supposed to be a scholarly event but almost became a riot.  My roommates and I went to hear a debate on affirmative action, the hot button issue of our day.  The speakers were famous professors, half liberal, half conservative.  We came late, of course, and found terrible seats in the back.  There was a mob-like line out the door, and the crowd was tense and wild, like a rock concert.  People were pushing to get in.  One girl tried to save a whole row and nearly caused a fistfight. 

Then came the announcement: the room was too small.  It was a fire hazard.  Harvard was moving the debate to a bigger auditorium.  People went crazy, shoving toward the door.  Of course, we were in the back, without hope, until my roommate saw people – Harvard students! – climbing the radiators up to the windows ten feet above us. 

Well, why not? 

From high above, perched on the ledge ready to jump, I saw shadows of students running across the field, already stampeding to the next building. 

I asked myself: Where on Earth was I?  I leapt and dropped ten feet, feeling something go thud under me as I landed.  It was a poor student, crushed by my fall!  I tried to beg forgiveness but the figure was already back up and sprinting across the field!  I saw a big moon above and wondered:

Had America’s best and brightest gone lunatic? 

Were we all just werewolves deep down, harboring a beast within? 

We got perfect seats in the next room.  We were proud.  Gloating!  What industry!  What dedication!  To leap from a window for knowledge!

And then they moved us again, to Sanders Theater, the biggest lecture hall on campus. 

By the time we got there, we were last again, sitting in the top balcony.  The famous professors looked like ants in the distance. 

How were we supposed to feel? We’d gone from embarrassed (back row late-arrivals in the first room) to proud (front-row industrious window-jumpers in the second) to defeated (upper upper balcony)?  And worse still, we found out later that some students were even smart enough to predict the future, skip the middle room, and head straight to Sanders!

What did I learn that night? 

For one thing, you can label just about any outcome fair or unfair depending on when you start the clock.  I’m no moral relativist.  I have an almost naïve sense of right and wrong.  But that night taught me to be very careful whenever I become too certain of my own rightness.

I also learned that inside the nation’s National Merit Finalists and Westinghouse Scholars, there is an angry mob just looking for the slightest excuse to come out.  Sure, the stakes were low that night.  But it was a great reminder.  Democracy is only as good as its citizens, and just as fragile.

And most important?  However crazy that night was, the real world was so much more complex.  And at the end of the day, all you could really know for sure was: win or lose, was I proud of the way I got there? 

Because the means don’t just get you to the ends.  They change the ends.  How you get there defines where you are and what it means.

The ghost that haunts The Faculty Club is Jeremy’s grandfather, a small town lawyer who made  a modest living and helped people.  While there are plenty of real ghosts in The Faculty Club, Jeremy’s grandfather is just a memory that tugs at his heart and guides his way.  To me, Jeremy’s grandfather is the Ghost of America Past: the generation that fought in World War II and put family and community above personal gain.  He’s based on my real grandfather, a Texas surgeon with a gentle manner and a twinkle in his eye.  When he died, I felt like I lost my connection to something stable and sacred in American history. 

It’s something my generation can save in the way we raise our own kids.

Because, at the end of the day, that’s what The Faculty Club is about.  What is a secret society but a way for people to pass on their values and ideas to the next generation?  And Jeremy has to ask himself: is this what I want to become?  And do I have the courage to say no – even if it means giving up everything I’ve ever dreamed of?

I won’t spoil Jeremy’s answer.  And I’ll keep working on my own.

As the Senate prepares for former President Trump's second impeachment trial, many are asking whether it's constitutional to try a president after leaving office. Alan Dershowitz, lawyer and host of the of "The Dershow," joined Glenn Beck on the radio program to talk about the legal battles Trump still faces.

Dershowitz said he believes the Senate doesn't have the authority to convict Trump, now that he's a private citizen again, and thus can't use impeachment to bar him from running for office again.

"The Constitution says the purpose of impeachment is to remove somebody. He [Trump] is out of office. There's nothing left to do.
It doesn't say you can impeach him to disqualify him for the future. It says, if you remove him you can then add disqualification, but you can't just impeach somebody to disqualify them," Dershowitz said.

"The Senate can't try ordinary citizens. So once you're an ordinary citizen, you get tried only in the courts, not in the Senate. So it's clearly unconstitutional," he added.

Dershowitz, who served on Trump's legal team during the first impeachment trial, also discussed whether he thinks Trump is legally (or even just ethically) responsible for the Capitol riot earlier this month, and whether those engaging in violence could be considered "domestic terrorists."

Watch the video below to catch more of the conversation:

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A new, shocking CBS News poll shows that the majority of Americans believe they're facing a new enemy: other Americans.

More than two-thirds of poll respondents said they believe democracy in the U.S. is "threatened," and 54% said "other people in America" are the "biggest threat to the American way of life," rather than economic factors, viruses, natural disasters, or foreign actors.

Will it be possible to unite our nation with statistics like that? On "The Glenn Beck Radio Program," Glenn and Stu discussed the poll numbers and what they mean for our future.

Watch the video clip below:

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Countless leaders on the left are now arguing that removing President Donald Trump from office won't be enough — they're now calling for the president's "cult-like" supporters to be "deprogrammed." And it's not just fringe politicians.

During an appearance on "Real Time with Bill Maher" last week, former NBC anchor Katie Couric said, "The question is, how are we going to really almost deprogram these people who have signed up for the cult of Trump."

Former Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Democratic Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi questioned whether the nation needs "a 9/11-type commission" to determine whether President Trump was colluding with Russian President Vladimir Putin "the day that the insurgents invaded our Capitol." Clinton also made sure to include her favorite "deplorables" in her unsubstantiated conspiracy theory:

"But we now know that not just [Trump] but his enablers, his accomplices, his cult members, have the same disregard for democracy," Clinton said to Pelosi.

Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson and New York Times Magazine's Nikole Hannah-Jones agreed that there is a need for "millions of Americans, almost all white, almost all Republicans" to be deprogrammed and punished, during an MSNBC interview last week.

Now, a story from the Washington Post is also preaching that narrative and even added that we need more restrictions for conservatives on social media and in the broadcast industry.

"So now we have to be deprogrammed? We've heard this over and over and over and over again, for months," said Glenn Beck on the radio program Tuesday. He read through the shocking details of the Washington Post op-ed and discussed the extraordinary dangers of the latest anti-conservative movement in America.

Watch the video below:

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As calls for censorship and restrictions against conservative voices get louder, Glenn Beck said he feels an "awesome responsibility" to speak, not the words he'd personally like to say, but those he believes the Lord would want him to share.

"It's an awesome responsibility, and one that I am not worthy of," Glenn said. "I want to say ... what He wants me to say. And I have to listen very carefully, because I feel the same way you do. But that will get us nowhere."

Glenn said it's time for Americans who are awake — not woke — to come together, no matter which side of the political aisle you're on, and stand with the truth.

"We are the Alamo, we will stand. But we desperately, desperately need you," Glenn said. "We need the people who are awake — not woke — awake. You may disagree with us. We are your allies, not your enemies. And if you will not stand with us in our hour of need, there will be no one left to stand with you in your hour of need. We must all come together, anyone who is awake."

Watch the video below to hear more from Glenn:

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.