Glenn Beck: YOU were the star




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GLENN: I have been saying the truth shall set you free, and you've already won. You've already won. Now just live it every day. The reason why I'm so optimistic and one of the miracles that I think came out of the 8/28 is you didn't bring any signs. So the media can't do anything about signs.

PAT: Oh, they wanted to.

GLENN: Oh, they wanted to.

PAT: Oh, they were hoping for, Obama's a socialist Muslim! Born in Saskatchewan, Canada! They wanted that so bad.

GLENN: They were just waiting for it.

PAT: Oh, they could taste it.

GLENN: Oh, yeah. So you didn't, you didn't bring any signs. They expected you to be angry and hateful. And what is it that Newsweek said? That we would go into a pit of hatred, and it didn't happen. Here is the Wall Street Journal editorial today: Glenn Beck's Happy Warriors.  This story actually takes me down but lifts you up. You probably couldn't find a more polite crowd at the opera. James Freeman, Wall Street Journal, today: Pundits will celebrate whether the crowd at Glenn Beck's Saturday or pundits will debate whether Glenn Beck's crowd Saturday in Washington was the largest in recent political history, but it was certainly among the most impressive. Mr. Beck is a television and radio broadcaster with a checkered past and a penchant for incendiary remarks, I don't know if that's true, but if he is to be judged by the quality of people of all colors that he has attracted to the Lincoln Memorial, his stock can't help but rise. One would not be able to find a more polite crowd at a political convention, certainly not at a professional sporting event. Probably not even at an opera. In fact, judging by the behavior of the attendees following the event, you would have had a tough time finding churches in which people display more patience as others make their way to exits. The army of well mannered folks that marched into Washington seem comprised mainly of people who had once marched in the U.S. Army or another military branch or at least had a family member who had. Perhaps that's not surprising, given the event was a fundraiser for the Special Operations Warrior Foundation which provides scholarships to the children of elite troops killed in the performance of their duties. The day was largely devoted to expressions of gratitude for their sacrifices, the U.S. soldiers, for great men of American history like Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., and for God. But it didn't end there. Dave reefer, a Vietnam veteran, offered a closing prayer in which he thanked the Lord for the president and for congress. Despite the unpopularity of the latter two, no booing or catcalls could be heard. Perhaps feeling defensive about how they would be hoary varmint portrayed in media reports, various attendees wore T shirts noting that they were not violent or nonviolent. But for other participants there was no need for an explicit message. Relaxed young parents felt comfortable enough to push toddlers in strollers through the crowded areas along the Memorial's reflecting pool. Not only was the rally akin to a huge church picnic, in one journal reporter's description, but one had to wonder if the overachievers in this crowd actually left the area in better shape than they found it. After the event walking from the Lincoln Memorial's reflecting pool through the constitutional gardens, this reporter scanned 360 degrees and could not see a scrap of trash anywhere. Participants and volunteers had collected all of their refuse and left it piled neatly in bags around public garbage cans. Near Constitution Avenue, I did encounter one stray piece of paper, but it was too old and faded to have been left that day. Given the huge representation of military families at the event, maybe it's not surprising the grounds were left shipshape. A principle theme of the day was that attendees should restore the country by making improvements in their own lives. Be the change you wish to see in the world, as Ghandi once put it. Most of the participants were strictly amateurs, in the business of activism. For many it was their first appearance at a public demonstration. Their strikingly mild mannered nature might inspire even Mr. Beck to acknowledge that in a crowd estimated at 300,000 by NBC the craziest person at the event might have been the one with the microphone. While he admits that he's part entertainer and prone to over the top comments, his followers appear to be sincerely responding to his message that Americans need to cling to their best traditions. The conservative Mr. Beck's ability to draw this many people to Washington may suggest enormous gain this is where it goes off the rails.

PAT: Been great so far.

GLENN: The conservative Mr. Beck's ability to draw this many people to Washington may suggest enormous gains for Republicans come this fall.

PAT: Oh, boy.

GLENN: But the GOP shouldn't expect voters to simply hand them a congressional majority without making them earn it. If pregame chatter and off season optimism translated into victory, the New York Jets and Redskins would meet every year in the Super Bowl. Between Saturday's crowd in Washington and the tea partiers agitating for limited government, we may be witnessing the rebuilding of the Reagan coalition, the "fusion" of religious and economic conservatives that political theorist Frank Meyer once endorsed . Reagan always believed that the Republican Party was the natural home for this movement, but GOP leaders in Washington need to prove they are worthy of it.

PAT: That's a great article.

STU: You don't need to bring that to politics but that is the point, as far as the tea parties go.

PAT: This is different.

GLENN: And finally if the politicians are in lockstep with the people. But I don't think the politicians some of them are. You know, the new ones coming in are they actually believe in something. But that's the point. You've got to believe in something.

PAT: But finally somebody noticed, somebody noticed.

GLENN: Great audience.

PAT: Thank you.

GLENN: I have to tell you, I have to tell you, I so am willing to have people judge me by the people that listen. I have no problem. You take that crowd of 500,000. Now, I want to make this clear because if I don't say this right after, then they will say, well, you said that 10 minutes ago and that didn't even matter. They weren't related at all. If there's some nut job, no. Everybody has nut jobs listening to them. Everybody has nut jobs that are nut jobs, in every movement, in everything. But if you want to judge me by the people that came because I ask them to come in Washington D.C. where we received 500,000 people, the mall, the crowd stretched for almost a mile, and it was wall to wall people. It was almost a mile long. If you want to judge me by that collection of people, you go right ahead. You go right ahead. My apologies to you because I know my behavior sometimes because again I'm the individual, sometimes my behavior you go, oh, jeez, Glenn, why did you do that. I think you have the harder job because you have to be you have to have me. And you are like, oh, yes, I'm his friend. I'm the lucky one here. Look at, look at what they say about you. You go ahead and boycott. You go ahead. Why do you think my sponsors stay? Why do you think they stay? Because they know. They know. They know who my audience is. Why do you think my advertising works? Because my audience knows me and they know that I won't sell them a bunch of crap. And I know my audience. That's why our advertisers say you can boycott all you want. You've been doing it now for, what, two years? Gosh, it's incredible we keep going. Isn't that weird? Because our clients want our audience in their stores, buying their stuff. They know. They know what a quality audience this is. That's fantastic. Everything that they have said about tea partiers and everything else, everything, everything they've said, you've just disproven.

Now, tea party movement, learn from the no sign thing. Learn. What are they going to say? Look at this. They can't say anything. The tea party I've been to the tea parties. It's the same thing! But you judge by the signs. Stop with the signs! The tea party movement, I've been to those crowds. They are the same people.

So you are winning. You are winning. Don't you see? It is really such a blessing. Everything that they have said and tried to build for the last nobody's going to see. All you have to do is just keep comparing. On your websites and everything else, just compare. Compare the video and stuff that you have to the G 20, the people that go to the G 20, to the SEIU members that are beating people up. Just compare them. Just show them. Just show them. They say that we're grass, you know, we're not grassroots and everything else. Really? I don't know the organizations like SEIU that were bussing people in. Do you know that? Did you see the unions bussing people in? I didn't see that. It's really weird.

PAT: A lot of ACORN buses, I think.

GLENN: A lot of ACORN buses?

PAT: Yeah, I think there was quite a few ACORN buses.

GLENN: That is fantastic.

[NOTE: Transcript may have been edited to enhance readability - audio archive includes full segment as it was originally aired]

TRUMP: The twilight hour of socialism has arrived

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The other day, at Florida International University in Miami, facing large American and Venezuelan flags, President Trump gave a rousing speech in Miami, including this line, the "twilight hour of socialism has arrived."

Trump went on to say:

Socialism is about one thing only—power for the ruling class. They want the power to decide who wins and who loses, who's up and who's down…and even who lives and who dies.

He then repeated a phrase that helped define his State of the Union address this year:

America will never be a socialist country.

Fittingly, Fox News posted an article yesterday exposing the overlooked evils of Che dangers of socialism that all too often disappear behind a flashy design on a t-shirt.

  1. Guevara said he killed people without regard to guilt or innocence. In an interview, Guevara said, "in times of excessive tension we cannot proceed weakly. At the Sierra Maestra, we executed many people by firing squad without knowing if they were fully guilty. At times, the Revolution cannot stop to conduct much investigation; it has the obligation to triumph."
  2. Humberto Fontova, author of "Exposing the Real Che Guevara," told Fox that Guevara created system that put gay people in labor camps. "The regime that Che Guevara co-founded is the only one in modern history in the Western Hemisphere to have herded gays into forced labor camps."
  3. Guevara opposed a free press: "In 1959, leftist journalist José Pardo Llada reported that Guevara told him: 'We must eliminate all newspapers; we cannot make a revolution with free press. Newspapers are instruments of the oligarchy.'"
  4. Guevara made racist statements: Guevara went on to write: "the black is indolent and a dreamer; spending his meager wage on frivolity or drink; the European has a tradition of work and saving."

These are just some of the many historical examples of the failure of socialism. President Trump is right. If the frivolities of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Bernie Saunders catch on and spread, we could have an unbelievable problem on our hands.

Poor Jussie: His narrative is falling apart completely

Tasia Wells/Getty Images for Espolòn

Here's how the media works now: Find a story that confirms their narrative, run it constantly and relentlessly. When the real story comes out, minimize exposure of the correction. Repeat.

We're seeing this pattern play out over and over again.

RELATED: John Ziegler isn't buying what Jussie Smollett's selling either

Here are some of the knee-jerk reactions that the media had to this Jessie Smollett hoax, from Insider Edition, CNN, E! News, Headline News, CNBC, TMZ, to name a few:


Montage: Watch the Media Uncritically Accept Another Outlandish 'Hate Crime' youtu.be


And those are just the reactions on TV. It was just as bad, at times worse, in print and online. I'll give you one special example, however. Because, you know the situation is bad when TMZ is connecting the dots and seeing through this guy's story:

The sources say there were red flags from the get go. Cops were extremely suspicious when Jussie took them out to the area where he said he was attacked and pointed to an obscure camera saying how happy he was that the attack was on video. Turns out the camera was pointing in the wrong direction. Cops thought it was weird he knew the location of that camera. And there's this. We're told investigators didn't believe the 2 alleged attackers screamed 'This is MAGA country' because 'Not a single Trump supporter watches 'Empire.''

Here's the man himself, in an interview just days after the alleged beating…I'm sorry, the alleged "modern day lynching." Here he is in an interview with ABC News, complaining about people making up stuff:



Strong words, spoken by a man who, allegedly, created the whole narrative to begin with.

This compromise is an abomination

Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Three decades ago, "The Art of the Deal" made Donald Trump a household name. A lot has happened since then. But you can trace many of Trump's actions back to that book.

Art of the Deal:

In the end, you're measured not by how much you undertake but by what you finally accomplish.

People laughed when he announced that he was running for President. And I mean that literally. Remember the 2011 White House Correspondents' Dinner when Obama roasted Trump, viciously, mocking the very idea that Trump could ever be President. Now, he's President.

You can't con people, at least not for long. You can create excitement, you can do wonderful promotion and get all kinds of press, and you can throw in a little hyperbole. But if you don't deliver the goods, people will eventually catch on.

This empire-building is a mark of Trump.

RELATED: 'Arrogant fool' Jim Acosta exposed MSM's dishonest border agenda — again.

The most recent example is the border wall. Yesterday, congress reached a compromise on funding for the border wall. Weeks of tense back-and-forth built up to that moment. At times, it seemed like neither side would budge. Trump stuck to his guns, the government shut down, Trump refused to budge, then, miraculously, the lights came back on again. The result was a compromise. Or at least that's how it appeared.

But really, Trump got what he wanted -- exactly what he wanted. He used the techniques he wrote about in The Art of the Deal:

My style of deal-making is quite simple and straightforward. I aim very high, and then I just keep pushing and pushing and pushing to get what I'm after.

From the start, he demanded $5.7 billion for construction of a border wall. It was a months' long tug-of-war that eventually resulted in yesterday's legislation, which would dedicate $1.4 billion. It would appear that that was what he was after all along. Moments before the vote, he did some last-minute pushing. A national emergency declaration, and suddenly the number is $8 billion.

Art of the Deal:

People think I'm a gambler. I've never gambled in my life. To me, a gambler is someone who plays slot machines. I prefer to own slot machines. It's a very good business being the house.

In a rare show of bipartisanship, Senate passed the legislation 83-16, and the House followed with 300-128. Today, Trump will sign the bill.

It's not even fair to call that a deal, really. A deal is what happens when you go to a car dealership, fully ready to buy a car, and the salesman says the right things. What Trump did is more like a car dealer selling an entire row of cars to someone who doesn't even have a licence. When Trump started, Democrats wouldn't even consider a wall, let alone pay for it.

Art of the Deal:

The final key to the way I promote is bravado. I play to people's fantasies. People may not always think big themselves, but they can still get very excited by those who do. That's why a little hyperbole never hurts. People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular. I call it truthful hyperbole. It's an innocent form of exaggeration—and a very effective form of promotion.

He started the wall on a chant, "Build the wall!" until he got what he wanted. He maneuvered like Don Draper, selling people something that they didn't even know they wanted, and convincing them that it is exactly what they've always needed.