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GLENN: Just want to continue just for a minute on this Rome analogy of

America, and you'll find it in the beginning of the

book Broke. But we looked,

we studied because, you know, the question is how did we get here and where are

we headed? And so the book starts with ancient Rome and talks about what did our

founders learn from the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, written by Edward

Gibbon, and you heard the bread and circuses, feed the people, distract them and

maybe you won maybe they won't realize what you've done to them. The ancient

Rome ploy is that when things are starting to fall apart, you distract the

people for a long time. Now, by 31 BC, Octavian was coming into power and he

knew that major changes had to be made in the Roman Empire. But the people still

worshipped the republic. This is before they were an empire. They worshipped the

republic. They liked freedom. They liked who they were and they didn't want to

lose that, and Octavian knew it.

You know, comparing Barack Obama to anybody always gets you in trouble, but

looking for the right Roman emperor might be the thing to look for, and he may

be Octavian. At least in this regard.

In 31 BC, they knew that the people loved the republic, which I don't think

Barack Obama knows that, but changes had to be made. And so Octavian's solution

was to give the people both what they wanted and what he thought they needed. So

instead of abolishing things like the republic or the Senate, he continued them.

They were still elected by the people. Assemblies still gathered. The Senate

still oversaw some of the provinces and advised Octavian, but it wasn't the

same. It was no longer a republic. And so they left the facade of the republic

there, and Octavian camouflaged his absolute power. Then he took over the

control of the armed forces and made resistance futile.

Now, here is the real beginnings. Listen to this. Things were falling apart.

Entertain the people. Give them stuff. And if you can concentrate on the stuff

for a while, they will forget what freedom really meant. Then while you're doing

that, then you camouflage your moves as emergencies and you camouflage your

moves also as freedom, under the guise of the republic, under the guise of the

Senate. But you just push it through. You maintain the illusion of the republic

and then you make resistance futile.



On Thursday, December 2nd, Glenn Beck brings his latest book to life on

stage and on silver screens nationwide for the timely event, Broke -

Restarting the Engine of America. Broadcast LIVE from Pittsburgh,

Pennsylvania’s Benedum Center to movie theaters nationwide.

- Find a movie theater and


buy your tickets

- In Pittsburgh?


Get tickets for the show...

One textbook writes about Octavian: In keeping with his policy of maintaining

the appearance of traditional Republican government, Octavian refused, refused

to be called the king or even dictator like Caesar. Instead he was just the

first citizen. This is what Tocqueville wrote in 1840: Thus having each citizen

in turn taking them and putting them into powerful grasp and shaping them to his

will. The government then extends its embrace to include the whole of society.

It covers the whole of social life with a network of petty complicated rules

that are both minute and uniform. Isn't that what we're doing? You knew have to

file forms. If you want to sell something over $600, isn't that what we're doing

now? How many how much more paperwork are we going to have to do? What is that?

We keep asking ourselves why would you do that? Well, Tocqueville wrote about

it. It covers the whole of social life with a network of petty complicated rules

that are both minute and uniform. Though even though each men or wait, wait,

wait. Through which even men of the greatest originality and the most vigorous

temperament cannot force their heads above the crowd. So what's that doing?

That's forcing everybody to be the same because even people who are in there and

they are fighters and they are, "I'm going to do it" and they're dreamers, they

just can't make it. They can't do it anymore. They give up. It does not break a

man's will, but it softens. It bends. It guides. It seldom enjoins. But it often

inhibits action. It does not destroy anything, but it prevents much from being

born. It is not tyrannical. It just hinders, restrains, stifles. If I may, it

nudges. That's all it does is nudge. Tocqueville said it nudges people into a

flock of timid and hardworking animals with the government as its shepherd.

We are going to I urge you to look at the book Broke. I keep picking this thing

up. I'll be at night and I'll pick it up and I'll just open it up to a different

section and I'll reread it and, oh, my gosh, this is it. This is what's

happening. I urge you to pick it up. Or if you I don't even know. Well, you can

go to the movie theatres. I don't know if the thing is sold out. Can I get a

ticket count on the thing in Pittsburgh, the live Broke show in Pittsburgh? I'm

doing one night on December

PAT: 2nd.

GLENN: 2nd. So is that next week?

PAT: I think it is.

GLENN: Yeah, next week I'm going to do something in Pittsburgh at the

Benedum

Theater which is a great, great theater. And tickets I guess are still

available. It's almost sold out. And tickets also will be available in

movie

theatres nationwide. And I'm going to show you the country as compared to a '65

Chevy I mean '65 Mustang.

STU: I don't what are you doing with the show? I don't think I understand it.

GLENN: What do you mean?

STU: Like what are you going to be doing in it? Like you are saying you've got

the I mean, it's the Mustang. You are saying that

GLENN: The Mustang is look

STU: Analogy again?



1965 Mustang - It's Unbelievable!

GLENN: Here's what we have to decide. Do we want a classic car? Do we want a '65

Mustang? I picked the Mustang because it's a car I've always wanted. I've always

wanted a '65 Mustang and a '62 Continental with suicide doors, convertible. Love

that.

STU: Yeah.

GLENN: Love that. But the Mustang is the greatest American car, I think,

greatest American car built.

PAT: 1967 Chevrolet Corvette, Stingray.

GLENN: Oh, Stingrays? Ick. Really?

PAT: Really.

GLENN: You're a Stingray guy? Oh, I lost so much respect for you.

PAT: What? Why is that so much worse than a Mustang?

GLENN: A '67 Stingray Corvette? Really? That's your dream car?

PAT: That's cool, yeah. Now, that's



Unrelated: Since we couldn't find a 1967 Corvette commercial, here's one

from 1984

GLENN: That's your dream car?

PAT: That's a car.

GLENN: All right. So '65 Mustang. Pay no attention to Pat. That is not the car

you're looking for.

STU: (Laughing).

GLENN: '65 Mustang I think is just, just, it epitomizes, I don't know, just that

free spirit and that Mustang, in the horse and in the car. And what we've done

is we have, over the years, tried to make it into a family car and we've tried

to make it into a station wagon and then we've decided it was going to be public

transportation and then we've put some other things on it, maybe a solar panel

on the back to make sure that it's that's not what it is. That's not what it is.

And that's we've done this to the entire country. We have to decide, do you want

freedom? Do you understand that it's a Mustang? If not, if you don't want a

Mustang anymore, then sell the damn Mustang. But let's stop taking it and

bastardizing it and then blaming it on the Mustang: Well, that's just a crappy

car. No, no, no. No, that was one of the best cars made. That is just a great

car. But you have to understand what it is. It's not a hybrid. You want a

hybrid? Sell the damn car. Recognize it for what it is. That is a great car. And

maybe it was a great car for 1965 and it's not one today. But somebody

appreciates it. I do. So we either recognize it and sell it and then we start

all over again and we get whatever it is we want, a little, you know, we'll be

Yugo, or we restore it. That thing restored, who doesn't want a 1965 Mustang

besides Pat? Fully restored? Who? As long as you understand that's what it is.

It's not a Ferrari and it's not a Smart car. It's a '65 Mustang.

PAT: Of course, there's a 1973 AMC Gremlin, too. That's a car. That's a car.

GLENN: That's what we're building.

PAT: It really is.

GLENN: That's what we're building.

PAT: Really is.

GLENN: We're building the Gremlin.

PAT: Yeah. We tried to turn the Mustang into the Gremlin.

GLENN: Into the Gremlin, and the bus.

PAT: Which everybody knows does not work. Never did. Never will.

GLENN: Never will. So that's what do you understand?

STU: Yeah. Oh, yeah.

GLENN: So I have a mechanic on stage. We have a Mustang that is not running and

we're going to take the parts out and I'm going to show you what the parts are,

you know, what they're akin to in real life, in our government. What did we do

to this thing? What did we do? Now, we can either, we can ditch it or we can fix

it. And once we understand what all the parts are, then we have to go back and

look for the original parts, put it back together. When we put it back together,

that thing hopefully, by the end of the show, will start up and it will be

great.

STU: You're not going to be, you know, touching the car parts or

GLENN: Well, I'll be touching them but I won't be fixing them, no.

STU: Because if you have anything to do with it, the car will likely explode and

set the entire thing on fire.

GLENN: It's very dicey. It's very dicey. We kind of went down this road and

everybody said, "You don't know how to fix a car." And actually it started

before that. They said, "Okay, well, what parts, you know, what parts are what?"

And I said, oh, I don't know anything about an engine.

STU: (Laughing).

GLENN: And Rich looked at me and said, excuse me? And I said, "No, I don't know

anything about engines." Just find out, you know, like what part would be like

the Fed. And he said, oh, we'll just ask a mechanic that, you dope!

STU: (Laughing). How dare he assume you had knowledge of what you were doing

before you did it! What a jerk! I hate that guy!

GLENN: I just assumed everybody would understand that I don't know what the hell

I'm doing with a car. I mean, did you see the photo shoot? I was in a movie oh,

by the way, have you seen have you brought the kids to Megamind?

PAT: No, not yet.

GLENN: It's really good.

PAT: Is it? It looks pretty good.

GLENN: It's really, really good. I really liked it. But anyway, so I'm sitting

there and my face comes up on the screen and my little kids are like, oh, Dad,

we're so sick of you. And we went out and we, you know, we shot this in a garage

and you know, I never used a blowtorch before and neither has anybody really on

my team, we were in this and the guy, the guy who was running this garage, he

just looks at us like, you people, you are not even men. Get out of my garage,

you know. And then George Lange who's a little flamboyant is like, this is just

so picturesque! And I'm like, no, no. George, shhh, no, it's a garage. They are

going to kill you with a wrench.

On Monday's episode of "The Glenn Beck Radio Program," Glenn opened up about the tragic death of his brother-in-law, Vincent Colonna Jr., who passed away unexpectedly on April 5. He also shared some of the important thoughts and insights he's learned through the grieving process.

"Last Monday, I was sitting in this chair ... the two-minute warning comes and Stu said to me, 'You ready for the show?'' ... And that's when my wife [Tania] came to the door of the studio here at our house and said, 'I...' and she held the phone up. And then she collapsed on the floor in tears," Glenn began. "Tania's brother had passed. To say this was a shock, is an understatement."

Glenn described his brother-in-law as having "a servant's spirit."

"He was always the guy who lit up the room. He was always the guy helping others. He would never stop, because he was always helping others," Glenn said of Vincent. "He was on the school board. He was a little league coach. He was the soccer coach. He helped build the church. He took care of the lawn of the church. He was constantly doing things, raising money for charity, working over here, helping to organize this. But he was never the guy in the spotlight. He was just the guy doing it, and you had no idea how much he had done because he never talked about it.

"We also didn't know how much mental anguish he was in because he never talked about it. And last Monday morning, after spending Easter with the family ... he killed himself. This is now the third family member of mine that has gone through this. And I keep seeing it play out over and over and over again, in exactly the same way."

Glenn described his thoughts as he, Tania, and her family struggled to come to grips with the devastating loss.

"I learned some really important things as I was watching this wake. I'm seeing these people from all walks of life ... the people that were there, were there because [Vince] made a difference in their life. He was a true servant. As I'm watching this, all that kept going through my mind was, 'by their fruits, ye shall know them.' The fruits of his labor were on display. He was a servant all the time. All the time ... he found a way to love everybody.

"There are two great commandments: Love God with all your heart and mind and soul. And love your neighbor. So those two great commandments boil down to: Love truth. Because that's what God is," Glenn said.

"Love thy neighbor. That's where joy comes from. The opposite of joy is despair, and that is the complete absence of hope ... and how do you find joy? You find joy by rooting yourself in the truth. Even if that's a truth you don't want to accept. Accept the truth," he added. "But we have to stop saying that there's nothing we can do. What are we going to do? Well, here's the first thing: stop living a lie."

Watch the video clip below to hear more from Glenn:


Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

After imprisoning a pastor for refusing to follow COVID-19 restrictions, Canadian officials barricaded his church. And when some church members retaliated by tearing down part of the fence, Canadian Mounties arrived in riot gear.

Rebel News Founder Ezra Levant joined Glenn Beck on the radio program to give his insight on the crazy situation. He described the new, armed police presence surrounding GraceLife Church in Edmonton, Alberta, and how it not only encouraged hundreds of protesters to stand with the church in support but forced congregation members underground to worship as well.

What's happening is eerily similar to what occurs everyday in China, Levant says, and it must stop. Who would have thought this type of tyranny would be so close to home?

Watch the video below to hear Ezra describe the religious persecution taking place in Canada.


Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

Enough prayers? Why is supposed Catholic Joe Biden suggesting that Congress ought to stop praying for after someone commits acts of gun violence?

On Friday, Stu Burguiere and Pat Gray filled in for Glenn and discussed President Joe Biden's remarks during his speech on gun control. "Enough prayers. Time for some action," Biden said. Stu and Pat were surprised how dismissive Biden appeared to be on the idea of prayer.

Watch the clip to hear more. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

Just days after Canadian pastor James Coates was released from prison for refusing to bow to COVID-19 lockdown restrictions, several police officers showed up at another church to ensure restrictions were being followed. But Polish pastor Artur Pawlowski of the Cave of Adullam Church in Alberta, Canada, knew his rights, telling the cops not to come back until they had a warrant in hand.

Filling in for Glenn Beck on the radio program this week, Pat Gray and Stu Burguiere played a video of the interaction.

"Please get out. Please get out of this property immediately. Get out!" Pawlowski can be heard yelling at the six officers who entered his church.

"Out! Out! Out! Get out of this property immediately until you come back with a warrant," he continued. "Go out and don't come back. I don't want to talk to you. You Nazis, Gestapo is not allowed here! ... Nazis are not welcome here! Do not come back you Nazi psychopaths. Unbelievable sick, evil people. Intimidating people in a church during the Passover! You Gestapo, Nazi, communist fascists! Don't you dare come back here!"

Watch this clip to see the heated exchange:

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.