Glenn Beck: 'Them'


Them: Adventures with Extremists

GLENN: 6%. There's now more people that say we didn't land on the moon -- I'm sorry, there are less people that say we didn't land on the moon than there are people who said the United States blew up the World Trade Center. Conspiracies are everywhere. The whole MexAmeriCanada thing when honestly I don't know how to explain it. I don't want to go down that road but somebody help me. Throw me a bone. Everybody is -- you know what? We are becoming quickly the opposite of E Pluribus Unum. We are starting to divide ourselves with these crazy ideas and these conspiracies and, you know, Barack Obama's preacher telling us that, you know, the white man is the problem and, you know, once the white man's gone, you'll be fine. Nobody's look at reality anymore. Nobody's even seeing -- what's happening to us and how do you survive in a world where, "Well, you know, it's the Bohemian Grove, the people who worship the owl people. You know, Henry Kissinger and George Bush and Bill Clinton, they are all in on it."

I mean, I believe that there are very, very powerful people who all think alike and who talk, you know, and get together and I don't think it's -- you know, I don't think they are worshipping the God, you know, the owl God and sacrificing people. And if I do, I don't want to be that guy.

Well, I found a book, I don't know, a couple of years ago and I read it and I just thought it was fantastic and since we've been kind of noticing that more and more conspiracies are, you know, popping up, I asked him to write the truth behind the trees infiltrating the grove. His name is Jon Ronson and he's the author of a great book called "Them." Jon from the United Kingdom, how are you, sir?

RONSON: Hey, I'm okay. How are you doing, Glenn?

GLENN: Very good. You are a journalist, right? And you are not a conspiracy nut.

RONSON: No.

GLENN: And if I remember, it's been a couple of years since I read your book. If I remember right, you kept passing this Muslim cleric on the street in the U.K. and you were like, okay, I mean, this is nuts, right?

RONSON: Yeah. Well, he lived a couple of miles away from me and he gave a big speech in Central London in about 1996 where he said he wasn't going to rest until he saw the flag of Islam flying over Downing Street and the White House. In fact, I actually thought it was kind of funny. Back then those things seemed funny. They don't seem so funny anymore. He was a guy living in north London who was determined to overthrow democracy. So I asked him if I could hang out with him for a year while he did that and that's really how this amazing adventure began.

GLENN: For a year?

RONSON: Yeah, I became -- it was kind of, for the first few months it was okay and then he said to me one day, you know, I have let you into my life, I have given you much, I would like something in return. And I said, okay. And he said, can you drive me to Office World. And so for the next six months I became his chauffeur, you know, driving him to --

GLENN: Can you drive -- for some reason I just don't see an extremist Muslim cleric saying, I've got to go to Office World, can I catch a ride with you?

RONSON: Well, Office World gives you a special prize promise, they double your money back if you use their photocopying services.

GLENN: And if I remember right, he had one good eye to look for that.

RONSON: No, that's his friend, fellow preacher.

GLENN: That's his friend.

RONSON: Yeah. They are very similar figures. They preached in the same mosque and they had a similar audience and they were pals. It was so interesting to me that, you know, he was the guy who was trying to overthrow our way of life, yet he was going to the photocopying service, you know, to offer the special prize promise. Plus, the only collection boxes he could find were these giant plastic Coca-Cola bottles. So he would collect them for hummus and these giant symbols of western period. That was kind of funny to me.

GLENN: If it wasn't so real, it would be funny.

RONSON: Yeah. Well, it was funny right up until, you know, 9/11.

GLENN: 9/11.

RONSON: Yeah.

GLENN: 7/7. The spookiest thing that happened with him was what?

RONSON: Well, there was a couple of things. One time he outed me as a Jew at a secret training program. I never told him I was Jewish and it seemed kind of weird that I was kind of chauffeuring him about. Anyway, he took me to his jihad training camp in (inaudible) airport at a place called Crowley.

GLENN: Hold on just a second. A jihad training camp right down the street from the airport.

RONSON: Yeah. It's like in a scout hut.

GLENN: Don't you guys over in the United Kingdom have, like, more cameras than all of America combined?

RONSON: Absolutely. (Inaudible). Although I lightly discovered there's a guy called Omar Bakri Mohammed who is a convicted terrorist. He was plotting to blow up some nightclubs and it said on the news that these plots began at this very same scout hut that I went to where Omar announced to all these young jihadists, he said, you know, look at me, look at me with the (inaudible) Jon, who is a Jew. And they all went (gasping). I said, well, surely it's better to be a Jew than an atheist. And I heard someone in the crowd say, "No, it isn't."

GLENN: No, really it is, I'm going to make that case but I'm going to go to the car right now. So then, Jon, so then what happened was you started there but then you started noticing that they were saying the same kinds of things that other conspiracy theorists were saying.

RONSON: Yeah, this was a big revelation to me. Others said did you know there was a shadowy cabal that was secretly ruling the world and they were calling the Bilderberg group and followers and they go to this place called Bohemian Grove and I haven't really thought much about it because I thought it was just kind of nutty conspiracy theories. But then about a year later I was in Arkansas in the Ozarks hanging out with a politically correct faction of the Ku Klux Klan.

GLENN: Politically correct.

RONSON: Yeah, this clan leader who started to become politically correct and ban the rogues and ban the hoods and ban use of the N word.

GLENN: Yeah. Did at any point did they say, "And we're here with my friend Jon who is a Jew.

RONSON: They asked me if I was a Jew but I was in the middle of the Ozark mountains surrounded by Klansmen which I think I'd be forgiven and I said no. They were having a raffle and all the prizes were things like Walter Matthau videos. It was like, the Jews were everywhere, I didn't feel so alone.

GLENN: You guys know that he's Jewish, right? I mean -- all right. So what did you find out there?

RONSON: Well, the same thing which I thought was extraordinary. They started saying, did you know that there was a secret group meeting in secret, they were called Bilderberg and they go to this place called Bohemian Grove and it just hit me that this was extraordinary that these two groups, you know, a Klan in Arkansas and a bunch of jihadists in north London would all believe these conspiracy theories that I've never heard of and so I started to take it seriously, not take it seriously that I believed that these conspiracies were true. But I again said well, you know, if these guys believe that there's a secret room, wouldn't it be kind of funny to go around the world trying to get into this, trying to find the secret room.

GLENN: And you went in to not only Bohemian Grove which we'll get into in just a second but you actually went into one of the secret rooms, right?

RONSON: Yeah, this place called the Bilderberg group which, you know, a lot of different conspiracy theorists have united and believe that it was the shadowy cabal that ruled the world. Now, it's partly the Bilderberg group's fault because, you know, they do exist and they are, you know, a powerful secretive organization of, you know, I guess you'd call them top globalists, centrist globalists, you know, who do want to wield power. They want to influence politicians and so on. And they quite often -- in the past they have denied existing. So it's kind of their own fault really that there's all these conspiracy theories around them. But I didn't think they existed and then I discovered this guy in Washington, D.C. called Jim Tucker, big Jim Tucker who dedicated his life to tracking down the Bilderberg group. So I hooked up with him. He had a lead that they were meeting in Portugal and so we flew to Portugal and just immediately we started getting chased by mysterious men in dark glasses, which was terrifying, as you can imagine.

GLENN: Okay. But you didn't, you still didn't believe in any of this stuff. Did you --

RONSON: By the time I started getting chased by these men in dark glasses, I began to believe and I completely freaked out.

GLENN: This is where the title -- this is where the title -- I'm sorry. This is where the title of the book came from. Was it at this point where your friend, "You know what, these things I don't believe but these things are starting -- and they said, you're starting to sound like "Them."

RONSON: Yeah, this was a guy who was suffering from throat cancer and he had his voice box removed. So he had to write everything down. And he wrote down, we were getting chased and playing poker in north London and said, it's all true, the conspiracy theorists are on to something. And he wrote down, you are sounding like one of them, wrote "Them" in huge letters and I thought, that's what I'll call the book.

GLENN: But things have changed and I want you that talk about your experience at the Bohemian Grove and the article you wrote for Fusion magazine.

RONSON: Sure.

GLENN: And then I want to talk to you about the new conspiracies that are coming and how people who are so -- like you found in London, we're finding here in the United States where southern extreme right wing secessionists in the South are uniting with extreme left wing secessionists in the north.

RONSON: Yes.

GLENN: And they're both saying enough of America.

RONSON: Yes.

GLENN: And there's enough of this, you know, 10% here, 5% here, 15% here of these groups that are all starting to unite and say, you know what, we should unite because we don't agree with what you say. But you know what? We agree on this thing that this just has to end. And it's starting to get really frightening.

RONSON: I agree. You know, when I wrote "Them," conspiracy theorists were still kind of, you know, minority who would live on the fringes of society and, you know, I sort of point out in "Them" that a lot of terrorists and extremists are also conspiracy theorists and if you would like, it was a piece of information that people just didn't realize. But now, post 9/11.

GLENN: It's getting worse now.

RONSON: Yeah. You know, I heard the University of Ohio did a study where they determined that I think 36% of the American public believe that 9/11 was an inside job?

GLENN: Oh, yeah. You have -- there's a study out that I reported on because Barack Obama's preacher was saying that Americans started AIDS, the CIA started AIDS and give it to African-Americans as mass genocide.

RONSON: Right.

GLENN: And I think it's 53% of African-Americans in this survey claim that part of that is true and that there is a cure for cancer but it's being held back by the rich -- I'm sorry, not a cure for cancer. Cure for AIDS but is being held back by the Government because they want the poor to all die. It's amazing.

RONSON: Right, right. Because, you know --

GLENN: Jon, I tell you what, hang on just a second. I have to take a commercial break and we'll come back. Jon Ron son is the author of "Them" and an article on the Bohemian Grove. You'll laugh out loud and you'll learn an awful lot as well. It is in Fusion magazine and you can get it at 888-Glenn-Beck or go online and order it now. Don't miss another episode of Fusion magazine, another issue. You can get it online or we send it to your house. It's a great funny magazine, entertainment and enlightenment all rolled up into one and it includes the Bohemian Grove beyond the trees, at GlennBeck.com.

Sen. Ted Cruz: NOBODY should be afraid of Trump's Supreme Court justice pick

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Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) joined Glenn Beck on the radio program Wednesday to weigh in on President Donald Trump's potential Supreme Court nominees and talk about his timely new book, "One Vote Away: How a Single Supreme Court Seat Can Change History."

Sen. Cruz argued that, while Congressional Democrats are outraged over President Trump's chance at a third court appointment, no one on either side should be afraid of a Supreme Court justice being appointed if it's done according to the founding documents. That's why it's crucial that the GOP fills the vacant seat with a true constitutionalist.

Watch the video below to hear the conversation:

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Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) joined Glenn Beck on the radio program Wednesday to talk about why he believes President Donald Trump will nominate Judge Amy Coney Barrett to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death.

Lee, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee that will consider and vote on the nominee, also weighed in on another Supreme Court contender: Judge Barbara Lagoa. Lee said he would not be comfortable confirming Lagoa without learning more about her history as it pertains to upholding the U.S. Constitution.

Watch the video below to hear the conversation:

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This week on the Glenn Beck Podcast, Glenn spoke with Vox co-founder Matthew Yglesias about his new book, "One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger."

Matthew and Glenn agree that, while conservatives and liberals may disagree on a lot, we're not as far apart as some make it seem. If we truly want America to continue doing great things, we must spend less time fighting amongst ourselves.

Watch a clip from the full interview with Matthew Yglesias below:


Find the full podcast on Glenn's YouTube channel or on Blaze Media's podcast network.

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'A convenient boogeyman for misinformation artists': Why is the New York Times defending George Soros?

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On the "Glenn Beck Radio Program" Tuesday, Glenn discussed the details of a recent New York Times article that claims left-wing billionaire financier George Soros "has become a convenient boogeyman for misinformation artists who have falsely claimed that he funds spontaneous Black Lives Matter protests as well as antifa, the decentralized and largely online, far-left activist network that opposes President Trump."

The Times article followed last week's bizarre Fox News segment in which former House Speaker Newt Gingrich appeared to be censored for criticizing Soros (read more here). The article also labeled Glenn a "conspiracy theorist" for his tweet supporting Gingrich.

Watch the video clip below for details:


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