Welcome, Fusion Magazine June 2010

Photo Courtesy of George LangeEvery year it happens again. You almost forget it’s coming, but then just as soon as the weather turns nice and you start thinking about all the things you can finally get done around the house…everything changes. Your once calm and peaceful existence is shattered as you’re plunged into a world of disorder and chaos. No, I’m not talking about the coming of a plague like locusts or the American Idol tour making a stop in your town, but of an annual event so terrifying that it sends a chill up the spine of every parent in America.

Your kids are home for summer vacation.

OK, maybe it’s not quite that bad, but suddenly school is not occupying their attention and now it’s all about you. And I say…GREAT! Yes, schools are good at teaching reading, writing and ’rithmatic (well, most of the time anyway), but there’s so much more that our children need to learn—lessons that will help them not only be good students, but good Americans. And when it comes to that, you’re the best teacher they could ever hope for.

When I think back to the summers I spent with my family at my grandparents’ farm, I realize that I learned more there than every moment I ever spent in a classroom. My grandfather had a Ph.D. in Real Life, and one of his favorite courses to teach was WorkEthic 101.

But before I get to Grandpa, let me ask you this. Is it just my neighborhood, or has the “kid with a lawnmower” been put on the Endangered Species list? I remember when kids were more competitive than Microsoft and Apple in trying to see how many lawns they could mow in a summer. And when the leaves fell, they traded mowers for rakes, and then rakes for snow shovels. We’ve got just as much grass, leaves and snow today as we did back then, but you’d need to be Indiana Jones to find so exotic a treasure as an industrious kid with grass-stained sneakers. And I’ve been looking! Kids don’t even mow their own lawns any more—what happened to chores? I promise you, before my kids ever dream about driving a car, they will be experts at operating a different motorized, four-wheeled machine. (Hint: It has a bagger attachment that catches clippings.)

OK, back to my grandfather. He had a berry farm, and we’d spend a lot of time there in the summer, and he’d pay each of us kids to pick berries. I’d go down a long row of bushes and then show my grandfather what I picked. He’d say something along the lines of, “OK, that’s a good start. Now go back again and get all the ones you missed.” And I would, reluctantly. Invariably my grandfather would end up saying that same phrase again and again, and I’d make three or four passes for each row. My sisters? One pass and there wouldn’t be a berry in sight. See, life “on the farm” didn’t come easy to me. I was a little lazy. That was all right with my grandfather. That just meant he’d have to spend a little more time with me to set me straight. I’m glad that he did.

My grandfather instilled that same work ethic in my father, Mt. Vernon, Washington’s hardest working baker, and both those men drove it into my thick skull. They did it because it needed doing, but they also did it because they loved me and knew what it really took to be successful in life. We’re all blessed to be born Americans, but to thrive and prosper here, you need more than luck—it takes character, commit-ment and good old-fashioned hard work.

Somewhere along the way, that idea seems to have faded into the background as progress has made everything better, faster and easier. I fear that we’ve lost touch with what it feels like to sweat a little get our hands dirty…get down on our hands and knees to reach the berries way at the back of the bush. My grandfather taught me that the effort made those berries all the sweeter, and he was right. I believe this summer gives you and me—all parents really—an excellent opportunity to remind our kids that negotiating a handout may pass for a “work ethic” in Washington, but it won’t fly at home.

Moms, dads and grandparents, this summer “teach your children well.” Don’t let them sleep in or spend all day in front of the computer or TV. Every day there are opportunities to instill a work ethic in your kids, and I say don’t miss out on one. Whether it’s mowing the lawn or taking out the trash…setting the table or doing the dishes. Heck, even if it’s learning how to play actual baseball instead of video baseball, let’s get our kids involved in the process of making themselves better people and, as grand as it sounds, better Americans. We owe them that much. And who knows—when you introduce your kid to the wonderful world of mowing neighborhood lawns for money, you might just be training the next great entrepreneur! And then send ’em to my house—Raphe’s still too short to reach the mower and my backyard’s a mess.


 


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There are new curriculum standards being implemented into schools throughout the nation for health classes that not only go far beyond what's appropriate for young children, but are entrenched in clear political biases, too. Under the standards, third-graders are taught about hormone blockers and endless gender identities, and topics get shockingly graphic for kids as young as 11. Some schools are even teaching their teachers and kids to ignore what parents have to say about these topics. And the worst part may be that many parents are completely unaware what their children are being taught.

Tina Descovich, co-founder of Moms for Liberty, joined "The Glenn Beck Program" to explain exactly what you can ask at your next school board meeting to ensure this "horrifying" curriculum isn't being taught in your kid's school.

Watch the video clip below:

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

It should come as no surprise that a newsworthy story receives more media coverage when released on a Monday than a Friday. The reason is in part due to a large number of news-consuming Americans checking out for the week to focus on their weekend plans rather than the news.

On Monday's radio program, Glenn Beck shared information that President Joe Biden decided to release on Friday — when fewer people would notice — regarding the Climate Finance report. This report is marketed to Americans as "A Roadmap To Build a Climate-Resilient Economy." But Glenn believes the report to be Biden's Great Reset warning shot to banks.

In this clip, Glenn warned that if Americans don't stand together, in eight years we all indeed will own nothing. Watch the clip for the full story. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.



Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.

On today's radio program, Glenn Beck was joined by Bill O'Reilly to discuss the top stories of the week.

For O'Reilly, the biggest story this week centered around someone mysteriously missing from mainstream media news reports today: Mark Zuckerberg. Specifically, O'Reilly said it's the 'scandalous' way the Facebook CEO spent nearly $420 million to influence the 2020 election — and did so successfully.

Watch the clip to hear the full conversation. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.

On Thursday's radio program, Grace Smith and her father, Andy, joined Glenn Beck on the phone and provided a first-hand account of Grace's refusal to wear a mask at school.

Smith, 16, began a maskless protest after her school district in Laramie, Wyoming, decided to implement a mask mandate. As a result, Grace received three suspensions, was issued two $500-citations, and was eventually arrested.

"How long were you in jail?" Glenn asked.

Grace said was taken to jail but was never booked nor was she was placed in a jail cell.

Glenn commended Grace's father, Andy, for raising such a "great citizen" and asked if it was Grace's idea to protest. Andy said it was Grace's idea, explaining that they took the position of arguing on the grounds of civil rights rather than the efficacy of wearing a mask.

Grace has since withdrawn from public school and started a home school program. She also told Glenn that she will continue to fight the school district, legally.

You can donate to Grace's legal fund here.

To hear more from this conversation click here.

Disclaimer: The content of this clip does not provide medical advice. Please seek the advice of local health officials for any COVID-19 and/or COVID vaccine related questions & concerns.

Want more from Glenn Beck?

To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution, and live the American dream.