Why Disney TANKED in 2023
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Why Disney TANKED in 2023

Disney is taking hit after hit at the box office and marked its first (non-pandemic) year since 2014 in which it failed to release a billion-dollar movie. And apparently, Hollywood workers are all too aware of what the issue is. Glenn speaks with Film Threat founder and publisher Chris Gore, who has spoken with Disney insiders, including animators and current and former employees as part of a series of stories called "The Disney File." He reveals some of his biggest finds: "All of the veteran talent has been driven from the company," he says, "starting with John Lasseter. And his departure was not what was described in the media." And they've been replaced by what many Disney insiders have described as woke "activists." Chris also describes a "toxic" work environment that pushes DEI and trashes the company's own movies. "I have never seen a company tube their credibility faster," Glenn says. So, will Disney finally take a hint?

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Transcript

Below is a rush transcript that may contain errors

GLENN: It was another scandal for Disney. Only now Disney has I show you or another lost its ability to shed scandals with ease.

Disney is just dying on the vine. And it couldn't happen to a better group of people. It really couldn't.

I -- I wish them to receive all of the things and the seeds that they have planted.

You know, they used to be -- they used to be the company that would bring joy and magic. And now it's black magic. And, you know, just some corporate empire. That, you know, will do anything for a buck.

And now they believe that they are the guardians of culture. And they are going to change our culture.

Their latest example is wish.

It's a movie that supposedly is to serve as the celebration of the 100th year of Disney magic.

It is hackie and uninspiring. And really not worth your time. And everybody knows that. Nobody is going to see it.

We have -- we have an inside look now, at what is -- what is happening at Disney.

And can they ever bring it back?

Film threat, the founder and publisher of Film Threat. Chris Gore is with us now. Hi, Chris. How are you?

CHRIS: Hey, doing great, Glenn. Thanks for having me on the show.

GLENN: So first of all, tell people about Film Threat. Because I'm not sure they know about it.

CHRIS: Well, it's an independent film. We were a magazine in the '80s and '90s. Now it's a website, and a podcast. And we have remained, oddly enough, politically agnostic through all of these --

GLENN: How did you do that?

CHRIS: Well, first of all, I don't know why any -- all the entertainment media outlets should actually be this.

GLENN: Yes.

CHRIS: It's really bizarre.

I feel obligated. A movie comes out. It's an independent film.

Fritz one side of the aisle to the other. We will cover it.

That's not true for all my leagues, in the industry, who cover film.

It's unfortunate.

GLENN: I mean, you did Matt Walsh's what is a woman? And it was actually objective. And I assumed it would never happen in today's world.

Never.

CHRIS: Yeah. I think it's an important documentary. It's worthy of coverage. And I don't know why it was covered by every media outlet.

I think it's an important conversation. But, you know, we'll also cover documentaries about drag queens.

GLENN: Sure.

CHRIS: We're all over the place. And I think that that's our obligation.

You know, we also -- we also reviewed Candace Owens documentary, BLM.

Which did not get a favorable review.

But we look at everything. And we try to be objective.

And I -- you know, I would like to see more of that.

GLENN: Chris, I am the biggest Disney fan.

I mean, I have the original prospectus, hand-colored by Walt Disney. I have been a fan since I was a kid. I've always been a champion for Disney.

I have never seen a company, tube their credibility, faster, than the Disney corporation.

And I have gone from a fan to somebody who can't wait to see them burn themselves out of existence.

It's -- it's a remarkable thing that's happening with Disney.

CHRIS: Well, it is crazy to watch in real time.

How they've taken one of the greatest brands.

One of the greatest brands. A family brand.

And I think it really has to do with getting away from their core values.

When I'm talking about those values.

I'm talking about the values of Walt Disney, the man. At the company.

Walton Disney was a proud American, who -- who espoused family values through his art.

And we -- we see where the company is now. It's become very corporate.

Filled with middle management bloats. Micromanaging all of their artists.

And as I like to say, I think corporate cultured kills creativity. And that's where we are at. There's more to this story.

There's a lot more to this story, actually.

GLENN: You have -- you have an article coming out, where you've talked to many of the insiders, who are giving you a real deep look into what's -- what the culture is there.

And there's one story about when everybody came back from work after COVID, and they were having a meeting about which breakfast cereals, to put into the break room. And what happened?

CHRIS: Well, it's a funny story. This was on a Zoom call.

They were coming back from COVID, and restocking the break room with cereals, which devolved into a conversation about privilege.

And if you ate certain breakfast cereals, when you were a kid, you were privileged.

But if you ate generic breakfast cereals, that said something about your upbringing, and status.

There seems to be a bizarre obsession with -- with all of this nonsense.

Identity. You know, privilege. And the fact that a simple conversation about restocking the breakfast cereal in the break room, devolved into that, shows you how bad the rot is. Which is at every level.

And the key word that's come up.

I will just say this.

The article coming up on the FilmThreat.com website, which is being written by my colleague Allan Ing.

It's -- we're currently talking about a dozen current and former employees of Disney. And also people who work in animation.

We're calling the series of stories, the Disney File. But the stories we're hearing are fairly shocking. So also --

GLENN: Like -- like --

CHRIS: For anyone that's paying attention. Shocking.

GLENN: Like what?

CHRIS: Well, ultimately, there's more specifics to it.

But ultimately, all of the veteran talent has been driven from the company.

Starting with John Lasseter.

And his departure is not as described in the media.

There was much more to it.

I believe that certain people felt threatened by John Lasseter. Probably because he was the most talented person at the company.

Nearly every Pixar film was a home run.

I mean, even the lesser Pixar films.

Even the lesser Pixar films. When you look at what Disney is putting out today.

They're amazing.

So that was the beginning of the rock. Was his departure. And that veteran talent has been not replaced by veteran talent. It's been replaced by -- and I'm using words that are in the correspondences, a key word came up in every correspondence with every person.

And that is activism. The people that have been replaced. They've been replaced by activists.

And it's at all levels.

You can't necessarily blame upper management.

But the rot is from beyond up.

GLENN: Right.

So somebody described to me. And said, Glenn, Bob Iger.

Nobody else can fix it now.

They felt that Bog Iger was responsible for this.

But they said, they hired activists.

And allowed them at the bottom, to just infest the Disney culture, if you will.

Then it just kept growing stronger and stronger.

And now there's really nobody left. To hand the company. And say, okay. All you guys, shut up. Get out of here.

You can't do it anymore.

Do you believe that's true?

CHRIS: I believe that's 100 percent true. 100 percent.

GLENN: Wow.

CHRIS: And I think it's just a company culture that's been created.

And those that don't agree with the direction of the company.

Have to remain silent. And are reprimanded, even for espousing certain ideas.

And the HR department at Disney, appears to work in an oppressive manner, creating a toxic work environment.

Where if you -- we're talking about innocuous posts on Facebook, from years ago.

An employee being dragged into HR, into HR. To have meetings at ungodly hours. You know, 6:00 a.m. or something.

With an attorney, sitting next to the HR person.

To discuss a social media post.

There is a fall in line attitude. And if you don't fall in line, you're not welcome at Disney.

Which has led to -- which has led to many of these people leaving have their own accord.

They're simply not welcome to think their own things.

GLENN: Well, I know creative people, and there's nothing that drives creative people more crazy. I mean, Walt would lose people from time to time. Because his management style was, keep them always guessing. You know, and it will make them sharper.

The animators hated that. But Walt was so good at what he did, that you're either in Disney or you're not.

Now that's not the case. No creative person is going to want to go to work every day, let alone be creative at work every day, if you're constantly looking at your DEI shoulder.

CHRIS: Well, that's 100 percent true. And on that note, interestingly enough, lecturers come to Disney often, to help animators. And discuss topics like how a giraffe runs. What does it look like when it runs. How do birds fly? Different type of birds. They have brought in lecturers to talk to all of the animators. And in our article, we will discuss the person who has been coming in with the animators.

Because not only was this DEI person saying, that based on your identity, you are -- you are racist, based on the way you look. You are just a racist person.

This DEI instructor. Instructor, lecturer, went on to critique all the Disney movies and why they're racist.

And why in particular, a movie called The Princess and The Frog is racist, which features a black princess.

GLENN: Oh, my gosh, that was to expose, to bring in African-Americans. And to expose people to a different culture.

That's what that whole movie was designed to do.

CHRIS: Well, yes. Absolutely. But this lecture pointed out, that because the -- the pretext to the film was to turn into a frog. And remained a frog for most of the movie. That that was racist.

And basically, this lecturer was telling the animators, everything you're doing wrong. Which erupted into a huge argument. Of some of the animators that stood up.

This is the problem. This is the big problem.

Is this is well-known throughout the animation industry. That Disney acts in this way.

There are other companies. For example, Illumination, you know, distributed by Universal. Their animated films. They avoided any sort of political messaging. They make movies that are entertaining.

Dominion's movies.

The Super Mario movie, which crossed the billion-dollar mark.

They're just making family entertainment, and they're well aware of that. Disney is the exception in this, where the messaging is a huge part of this. This is well-known in the industry.

It's become a whisper network.

Where animators, that have felt so betrayed, that these Walt Disney company's legacy is falling by the wayside. That they speak on private message groups about each other. About everything that is going on.

But here's the deal.

If people at the Disney company don't speak out, there won't be a company left to save. It's -- it's dire. When you look at the amount of money that they've lost this year. It's -- it's unbelievable. When you look at -- in the year 2019, Disney had seven movies, that crossed the billion dollar mark.

This year, it's zero.


GLENN: It's unbelievable.

It's the fastest. It's the fastest destruction of the greatest brand, ever. Of the 20th -- of the 20th century.

And you're right.

I'm not sure if it's going to make it.

Chris, I have to cut you short. But I apologize for that. I would love to have you on when the story comes out. And spend some real time with you because I think it's fascinating to see the price that they're paying. Chris Gore. The name of the website is filmthreat.com. Filmthreat.com.

​How to Heal Our Nation One Grocery Trip at a Time
RADIO

​How to Heal Our Nation One Grocery Trip at a Time

As the world becomes more and more chaotic, we can choose to either be mad or kind. Both are contagious, so what would you rather spread? Glenn reads an article that recounts something we are probably all familiar with: Leaving a grocery store parking lot. The writer recalls a stark distinction between two people: One man who was cursing up a storm and an older man who lent a helping hand and kind words. “Your attitude is a choice,” Glenn says. So, what choice will you make today?

Transcript

Below is a rush transcript that may contain errors

GLENN: Let me start with something I read on the Blaze today.

It's the Kroger checkout aisle. The woman in front of me has tried three different credit cards so far, and none of them have gone through. A few aisles away, a baby cries until her mom places an i Pad in front of her. She descends lazily, into the virtual world where she'll probably live most of her life.

I'm inspecting the quality of everything in my cart. Seeing if there's anything I could negotiate a discount for, while rethinking that bottle of Kombucha I grabbed. Do I really need that?

The woman bagging my groceries appears to be old enough to have comfortably retired by now. But instead, she's trying to lift my 12-pack of toilet paper into my cart. While I stop and tell her, I can handle that.

Maybe I've just been too wrapped up in my head to really take stock of the sincere moment of connection at the grocery store entrance.

It was just a brief blur of humanity in increasingly disconnected world. When she tells me the total, the cashier gives me a sympathetic look. It adds up fast now, huh. I give her a weak chuckle.

Yeah. Yeah. Sure does. Neither of us say, thanks Biden. But somehow we both know that we're both thinking it. And our smiles just widen a bit.

In the parking lot, there's a man on a speaker phone with somebody he's very angry with. He's shouting profanities into the phone, dropping N-words like he's J. Cole. I know he sees me loading my groceries in the back of my Kia Soul right next to him.

We made eye contact when he yelled into his i Phone about being disrespected.

It's one of the most beautiful Texas afternoons, I've seen in a long time.

There's not one. I mean, literally, not one single cloud in the sky.

The air has maintained the lingering crispness of a colder temperature, as the sun melts the winter away.

Someone cuts me off, in the way out of the parking lot.

And I realize, I can't blame Biden for that. I used to think the universal test of your humanity was whether or not you put your shopping cart into its designated shopping cart. But I think the bar is significantly lower now.

The new test is if you can handle grocery shopping without cussing somebody out.

I'm not angry because I'm still thinking about the old man I passed at the Kroger entrance. He was wearing a hat that I believe said he was a veteran from the Korean War.

He stopped the young man, whose job it was to pick up the carts that were scattered haphazardly in the parking lot, and return them to the store.

The old man shook the young man's hand. And said something that sounded like, you're doing good work.

I thought maybe he knew the young man.

Maybe it's a neighbor. That works at Kroger.

Maybe these men were neighbors too.

I don't know. It's not a big town.

Or maybe he didn't know him.

Maybe I had misinterpreted the whole scene in my usual distracted rush to get my groceries without collapsing into despair about the price of garlic.

Maybe I've been too wrapped up in my own head, to really take stock in the sincere moment of connection at the grocery store entrance.

It was just a brief blur of humanity in an increasingly connected world. I had a moment, watching the woman if you understood to find a card that wouldn't be declined.

When I thought, maybe I should just offer to pay.

But her card went through right before I acted. But I could only -- I could only trace the impulse back to that old man at the front of that old entrance. He was kind to somebody at the grocery store.

Maybe I could be kind too. I realized while driving the uncrowded Main Street back home. That humanity is equally as contagious as inhumanity.

But significantly less engaging.

I couldn't help, but remember the details of the man yelling into his phone. But the random act of sincerity by the old man, that went almost unregistered by me.

Headlines today are plastered with the end of the world. He killed her. They hate him.

Rarely is there an article about the old man who shook the young man's hand on a Sunday afternoon at the local grocery store.

Or the neighbors who finally escalated their friendship from an occasional hello. To the planning of game night.

The graduate of AA being baptized at church. Or the parents who worked it out, instead of splitting up. The countless stories of people who had every excuse to despair, to lash out, but didn't.

We don't read those stories. But we do live them.

I'm pulling into my the driveway where my husband is waiting to help me unload. We go on a short walk around the neighborhood. Notice everyone who has painted their door, or is having a cookout.

The sun is now setting, in that kind of endless skyway, Texans brag about.

We brag about it, when we get a call from a relative someplace else, asking how we are.

Ah. We're actually doing very well.

This is written by one of the newer members of my staff.

She is a remarkable woman. And when I first hired her, I said to all the other producers, she's not depressed yet.

Keep all of the news away from her.

She just has a way of looking at things, and seeing the good things in life.

And it's not because she doesn't read the news, she does. She just has a different outlook. Because she just -- I think -- as many of my staff do. They walk with God. Try to walk with God.

And somehow or another, she just has some armor on her, that I lack. And I'm a better man. Because I work with her.

And I work with -- I work with the best team ever. Except for Stu.

I go home, and my wife says, how was your day?

Hmm. Usual. Another better day in America.

And we laugh, or we commiserate, because she's been outside in the grocery store.

You know, one of our problems is, in fact, it may be our biggest problem, we're not grateful anymore. We're not grateful for anything, really.

We're not. You know how great we have it, still yet today?

With all of the problems that we have. And we've got big ones.

We're still the luckiest people in the world. Our standard of living is insane. Insane.

Even when we're struggling, we're better off than anybody in Europe.

Take a minute to notice. Don't let the bad things just impact you. Let the good things impact you as well. Maybe if you go to TheBlaze.com and you find this story, fear and loathing in the Kroger parking lot, read that, and then read the comments underneath it.

It's amazing how many were like, oh, yeah. I just saw this.

Or, you know, I'm going to do this. I stand by this audience. It's just different.

Read that article. Share it. Share your just in the comments. Better yet, just do something.

I don't think that guy in the -- in the hat, knew that guy.

I was raised by a dad, who could have fought in Korea.

He joined the Marines. And he was flat-footed. So they kicked him out.

He so wanted to be a marine. But he used to notice, people that were not noticed, all the time.

He was the kind of guy that was so embarrassing when I was growing up.

You know, I was -- we would go into a restaurant, and somebody would be really good. And he would say, can I see your manager?

I'm like, Dad.

And before he would leave, he would always say, you have an amazing server here.

You have an amazing employee. Sometimes, that's more valuable than a tip, I think. I mean, leave a tip. My dad used to leave tips too.

But nobody communicates with each other anymore.

I was in the parking lot of a grocery store, just a couple of weeks ago. I did the same thing with a guy. I was watching him. Young guy.

And he was rounding up all the shopping carts. And I thought, you can't get anybody anymore.

I was at a Popeyes. My wife is still gone, so dad made chicken last night. And I went through the Popeyes. And this guy was brutal. Just brutal. I've never been to a Popeyes where it wasn't a brutal experience. It's kind of like, it's great chicken. You know. They practically throw it at you, you know. But this guy was just awful. Miserable. Miserable.

My daughter, because I forgot my wallet, my daughter paid.

And she had Apple Pay. And this was his response. He just -- he opened up the window and he said, I don't remember. $480, please.

And before we could, you know, respond to the, oh, my -- hey, you're shouting at us. Wow, that's a lot of money for some chicken.

My daughter said, I have Apple Pay.

He said, oh, perfect.

And I'm like, I don't -- why?

Why? It's a choice, your attitude is a choice. How could you choose to be like that all the time?

So this guy was rounding up the shopping carts.

And I thought, man, look at him.

He's, actually, working hard.

And I went up to him too. And I said, hey.

Good job. Thank you. And I helped him push some stuff in.

I don't know if that made a difference in his day. But it did mine.

Just noticing, somebody working hard. Somebody trying to do the right thing.

WARNING: George Soros and The FCC Are DISMANTLING Talk Radio
RADIO

WARNING: George Soros and The FCC Are DISMANTLING Talk Radio

The mainstream media is collapsing as Vice Media and CBS News announce major changes. But now, progressives have talk radio in their sights. Glenn reviews the latest changes to the world of radio that could dismantle the entire system and crush free speech: George Soros is on the verge of taking control of Audacy, the second largest broadcaster in America; An investor based in Singapore is trying to take over Cumulus Media, the third largest broadcaster; And the FCC is forcing all broadcasters to start posting a race and gender scorecard on the demographics of their workforce. This is all an attempt to crush one of the last bastions of free speech, Glenn says.

Transcript

Below is a rush transcript that may contain errors

GLENN: I want to give a mile-marker. I feel that part of my job is to inform you.

What direction are we going in? And how fast are we going?

Let me give you a couple of stories that are gravely, gravely concerning.

I told you, last week, the Soros fund management, you know, run by billionaire George Soros and his son. Have now taken control or are on the verge of taking control of Audacy.

Audacy is the second largest broadcaster in America. Only iHeartRadio owns more.

And thank God, at this point, i Heart media. IHeartRadio has the Premiere Radio networks.

I've worked for this company in one way or another, since 1989.

They are my partner with this broadcast. And they have been always very, very supportive. If it wasn't for my partners, Julie Talbot and Dan Meador, and all of the people at i Heart media, who have just -- this show wouldn't be heard anywhere.

So i Heart is the only one, right now, not under attack.

And I will tell you about this. First, Audacy. Audacy amassed $1.9 billion in debt. They filed for bankruptcy.

And now Soros is taking on the -- the fund, and they will be the largest shareholder, once the bankruptcy proceedings conclude. Where are we?
They're dismantling radio.

And buying radio up. Now, Soros has already bought, what?

Last year. I think 50 radio stations that were all Spanish-speaking.

Gee. Isn't that interesting?

Now he's buying up, the second largest broadcaster in America.

Audacy owns 220 stations. News Talk, in New York. Chicago. Los Angeles. All some of the biggest news talk stations in the country.

They own the -- the radio stations, including KDWM, in Las Vegas.

Ph.D. Philadelphia.

KDK in Pittsburgh. They have Dana Loesch on many other stations. They have Sean Hannity. Mark Levin. And George Soros has spent more than $21 billion over the last few decades.

He spent 1.3 billion in 2022 alone.

Most of that cash went to left-wing causes, including Media Matters, Planned Parenthood, the Sunrise Movement.

He is the guy who has put in the radical DAs. And the radical attorneys general.

And now, what?

He's buying up talk radio. Why would you do that?

Why would you buy all of these broadcasts?

It seems like it's a failing industry, right? It's not.

It's not. About 80 percent of the people, till listen to radio.

80 percent. That's incredible. You think -- nobody listens to the radio. 80 percent still listen to the radio.

Okay. So that is the second largest broadcaster, now going to George Soros.

Then we have this.

Cumulus. Cumulus used to be the ABC radio network. It used to be the largest. Now, I think it is the third largest.

Cumulus is facing a takeover from an investor based in Singapore.

Part of the process of their bankruptcy. It has asked for, and received from the FCC permission to become as much as 100 percent foreign-owned.

So the third largest broadcaster, is about to go to a Singapore Holdings Company.

How does this bid, for America?

You have George Soros, and a Singapore can. And then i Heart, all alone.

But don't worry, news for radio gets even better. Yesterday, Brenden Carr, he's an FCC commissioner. He came out and said, the FCC has just ordered every broadcaster to start posting a race and gender scorecard, that breaks down the demographics of their workforce.

Activist lobbied for this, because they want to see businesses pressured into hiring people based on their race and gender. Courts have already overturned the FCC twice for pressuring broadcasters to making hiring decisions in violation of the Constitution.

I dissent.

This is a shot across our bow now, if the Supreme Court doesn't stop them again. We will now, if I want to be on radio, have to disclose, by the way.

I don't have a problem doing this.

I'm almost 2 percent Native American.

So I'm a minority, inside of a minority.

Anyway, we have to start hiring, based on gender and everything else.

I don't care what, you know, male, female. I don't care who you sleep with. I don't care what color you are.

I really don't.

I want to know what's inside of your head.

I want to know, how you think.

Can you bring something different, that I don't bring to the table?

That's how I hire.

Can you fit what your different thinking is, into what I'm trying to accomplish?

If you can, great!

We're going to work together forever.

Most of the people, that I work with, and I apologize for this. Spend their life with me.

STU: Sort of feels that way.

GLENN: Because we have a good working relationship. We all respect each other. Again, except for Stu.

This is really, and let me give you another one. This is not about radio.

Vice media, stops publishing on Vice.com. Slashes hundreds of jobs, amid mainstream media death spiral.

So all of these mainstream media companies, they're all -- did you hear about CBS?

And Catherine Herridge -- how do you say her name?

Herridge. Right? I can't remember.

Anyway, worked with her at Fox. We were obviously very close.

But she's very, very credible.

She's worked -- I don't agree with her all the time. But she's an actual journalist.

And CBS News they just threw her out.

She's gone. Now, they're saying, that's we've laid lots of people off, recently.

Because we're collapsing.

STU: That's their argument. For themselves.

GLENN: Yeah. We're collapsing.

Okay. Well, maybe. Or maybe a real journalist just isn't welcomed there anymore.

I don't know.

But everything, all of the media, what I said to Stu. And when we were at the height of Fox. I said, we have to get out of here.

And everybody is like, what?

Everybody works their whole life to get here. And I'm like, we have to get out of here.

I said, this whole thing is going to burn itself down. It's all going to collapse.

And here we are. It's all collapsing.

But as I said at the time as well, if you're here, while it collapses, and you'll survive, you'll then be working for the government.

Because all of these people, will get bail. They'll get bailed out by the federal government.

We can't. These institutions are far too important. This has it goes back to your Cloward and Piven stuff from yesterday.

It's worth watching. If you go to your Blaze TV account. You can watch it on demand.

It's one of those situations.

Vice is a great example of this.

How many articles did vice write about how your career and life were collapsing.

GLENN: Oh, my gosh.

Over and over again.

STU: Over and over again.

And all these companies, writing for years. About how conservative media personalities were going to flame out, and their businesses were going to collapse, are now all gone.

They're just -- they've all either dissolved. Or fired all their people. And AI is writing their articles.

It is, sure, satisfying. For me. But it is -- it is embarrassing for them, I would assume.

It's -- I don't know. Maybe they've all just -- they all moved on. They're all taking money from the government. And living at home now.

Or working from home now.

I don't know. It doesn't seem like they're able to keep any of these things afloat.

How much -- how much money did Vice get?

Billions and billions of dollars.

Of just free investment cash. Dumped into that place.

GLENN: Can you imagine if we would have had hundred --

STU: Oh, my gosh.

GLENN: Hundred million. Just 100 million. Compared to the billions that they had.

Just 100 million -- 50 million in investment.

Can you imagine what we could have done with it? Because we wouldn't have wasted it. They just wasted it.

STU: Gone.

GLENN: Gone.

STU: And this is also while they're producing shows for HBO. I mean, they were handed a media empire, with let's be honest, no valid reason to be handed a media empire.

I mean, like, vice did some interesting stuff early on.

They were kind of the different. They just turn into the typical left-wing news source.

And we were supposed to sit here and be like, oh, wow. This is amazing. It's innovative.

Let's just throw money at these people. What do they do?

The place is gone, basically.

GLENN: We sat there, for I don't know how many meetings. I sat there with big, big companies, that were trying to figure out, how we were doing it.

And at the time, we were doing it, more right than anybody else. We were still wrong.

And we had no margin of error. Because it was all on me.

And they were trying to figure out, you know, what do we do? What do we do?

And I remember sitting in meetings going, your numbers don't make sense. I'm sorry, guys. I'm not an accountant. I'm not a good businessman.

But I can look at this. You're selling what for what? And how do you even know that's true?

And it was all hype. It was all hype.

Now all that hype is over. And it's all falling apart. The mainstream media is falling apart.

And look what's happening.

You know, I mean, said recently, it's been quiet, on the western front.

It's been all quiet for quite some time in talk radio.

Haven't really had any attacks on talk radio. Been squished with digital. But on talk radio, haven't had a single problem.

That's new.

What was that all about?

They forget about us?

No. No. They're just going to take it.

They're just going to take it in public/private partnerships. And the left, because our billionaires do nothing.

Honest to God, our billionaires who believe in America, the only one that I know, that is actually putting his money where his mouth is. Is Donald Trump.

I mean, there is a handful.

STU: Yeah. I don't agree with that. There are some of these guys, very active. Not always publicly.

GLENN: Yes. But George Soros.

I mean, if you're going to stand up, stand up. Stand up.

You want to stay in the shadows? That's fine.

And I thank you for it. But get your friends to stand up. Why isn't -- we know the power of talk radio.

We know the power of radio. Where are our billionaires? Why aren't they stepping to the plate?

Why?

Anyway, I want you to do me a favor.

I want you to support your local radio station. The station that is -- is running this program.

Please, support them. Please, buy the advertising.

If you -- I'm not asking to you buy something you don't need.

If you hear somebody advertising.

Something like, okay. I need that.

Or I'm looking at that. Please, go to that store, or whatever.

Local radio is critical. Critical.

You've got to have a local radio station. That is not controlled by the Borge (phonetic).

We thank our sponsors, and we thank our local radio stations. Our affiliates. You're the heart of us. Thank you.

New York’s $355 Million Trump Charge Just Got MORE INSANE
RADIO

New York’s $355 Million Trump Charge Just Got MORE INSANE

New York’s $355 million civil fraud charge against former president Donald Trump just got MORE INSANE. The charge was already unprecedented. But Glenn and Stu reveal how New York has handled previous similar cases — including the MUCH WORSE actions taken by other companies charged under this rule. This is so obviously a targeted attack against Trump, Glenn argues: “There is no way that I would keep my business in New York. There is no rule of law now.”

Transcript

Below is a rush transcript that may contain errors

GLENN: Okay. Hello, Stu.

STU: Glenn!

You know, I was thinking about this big lawsuit.

GLENN: Yeah.

STU: Against the president, former president.

First, he had the $83 million from E. Jean Carroll situation.

GLENN: Which was really caused by him.

STU: This was an interesting point.

He got, I think a totally false accusation against him.

GLENN: Yeah. Totally false.

STU: He said, this was false, this is crazy. He fought it. They went through this case. I think he totally got screwed.

And they ruled against him for a few million dollars. And they said, basically, you can't go on and talk about this anymore.

And he just did.

He was like, I don't care what you say.

GLENN: Yeah. And you know what, you have that right, to do that. If that's what you -- you know, if that's what you want.

STU: He knew what the price of that was. Yes, correct.

STU: He knew the price would be high.

And sometimes, occasionally, people made the point, that Donald Trump, you know, creates some of his own issues. Okay?

GLENN: Yes. But he also has what I like to call FU money.

STU: He has FU money. Right. Exactly.

GLENN: 85 million, it's worth it. She sucks.

STU: Sometimes people have pointed out. That when he makes some of his own problems, he will still say he's the victim of persecution.

He will kind of go to that -- that's kind of the way it goes.

And some have noticed this over time. But might I address this lawsuit, that came down, and this ruling in New York.

GLENN: $355 million. It will cost him over 400 million, when it's all said and done.

By the way, ruling yesterday, the same -- or, the same Supreme Court justice.

Said with that he of some provided a good reason, as to why he should delay the judgment from last week.

So he said, you failed to explain much less justify any basis for a stay. I'm confident that the appellate division will protect your appellate rights. So he has to cough this up.

Now, they're talking about, this is so much money, that he's going to have to put up, probably real estate and sell the -- some real estate to be able to pay for this.

Because you have to put -- you have to put that money into a bond.

And then you have a bond holder, holding it for you.

STU: Right.

GLENN: And you have to pay them an additional fee.

STU: Right. Right. And then hopefully, you win the appeal. And eventually, don't have to pay it then.

GLENN: It will still cost you about 50 million. This has it will still suck.

GLENN: Yeah. Yeah.

STU: But talking about whether he's the victim of political persecution. I believe this case, it's actually provable.

GLENN: Oh, yeah.

STU: Like it is -- but it's not just, oh, yeah.

It's not the just, oh, yeah. Well, of course.

Because I think on its face, that's how I react to this.

Right? He's running for president of the United States. They're trying to put him out of business.

Throw him in prison.

Take him off the ballots.

It's so blatantly obvious, on the surface. That that's how I translate it.

GLENN: The only thing he hasn't been hit with is, you know.

Like, here. Have some uranium pie.

STU: Right. That's true.

GLENN: The only thing, is he's not been hit with an umbrella, or the little pin at the end of it. Like the CIA.

STU: That's about it. That's it.

And so I think on its surface, it's easy to just look at this. The details of this one, in particular, are so egregious.

First of all, it's not like, a -- this number that they came up with. They just came up with like an algorithm that they built to come up with this number.

And it's like, well, we think, if he didn't defraud these banks, then the banks would have made more money.

Now, of course, the banks could have gone to have, and requested a higher interest rate. Which they didn't do.

GLENN: Because they found him a good risk. Because they've done business with him before.

STU: Before. And they all knew he had lots of money. And they all knew he had a successful business.

They all knew he would pay back the loans. They all knew this would occur.

So they went down this road. Now, of course, their case in New York. Hey, you defaulted all these banks. Screwed all these banks out of money.

You have to pay $350 million to us.

GLENN: Right.

STU: The state of New York.

GLENN: Because the banks --

STU: The banks get none of this.

GLENN: They didn't file this.

There was no complaint. None.

STU: Even if you think there was no complaint.

If you're saying, they were defrauded. You would think, they would get the money.

But no. It goes directly to the state of New York. Which is just another comical layer to this.

But listen to this breakdown of this particular rule. This law. And how it's been used, in the past.

Because as you point out. There's no victims here. No one is coming.

No bank is like, hey. By the way, he lied about this. It didn't work out for us.

GLENN: In fact, the banks testified on his behalf. Saying, there was no victim.

We knew this. We take that into account with everybody we loan.

That's why we have a whole division that goes out, and does the estimates for us.

We know. We're not stupid.

STU: Right. So this law has been around for 70 years.

And it is -- there is multiple facets of this.

There's the big fine.

Which is kind of the headline.

Also, the fact that they might take his business away.

They're saying his kids can't run the business anymore.

They're trying to turn this into essentially a death penalty for this company.

GLENN: Yes, they are.

So it is the only big business. That was threatened with a shutdown without showing obvious victims or majors losses in 70 years.

The only one. Okay?

The AP went the lie 150 cases, since New York's repeated fraud statute was passed in 1956.

And it showed that nearly every previous time, a company was taken away. Victims and losses were key factors.

You would think, right?

Customers lose money, because they bought defective products or never received services ordered. Leaving them cheated and angry.

What's more, businesses were taken over, almost always as a last resort to stop a fraud in progress, to protect potential victims.

Let's look back at this now, because there is one case where they try to take a company. Which is what they're threatening here, with the Trump Corporation. The Trump Corporation.

GLENN: Hang on.

Do we have that clip of -- of the AGs saying that they will take it? Here it is. Listen.

VOICE: Four days after a judge ordered Donald Trump to pay $355 million for a decade of fraud.

New York attorney general, Letitia James says, she's prepared to do everything she can, to make sure the former president pays his fine. Including, she told us, seizing the businesses that have his name.

VOICE: If he does not have funds to pay off the judgment, then we will seek, you know, judgment enforcement mechanisms in court. And we will ask the judge to seize his assets.

STU: I love the -- she's so dramatic. It's hilarious.

GLENN: I know. I know. Think of that. You're doing business in this morning.

STU: Oh, I would get out of there. You have to get out of there.

GLENN: Get out of there. And honestly, if you live in New York, honestly, you have a house in New York, you're living in New York. You're just like, yeah. Well, we don't want to give up on New York.

Get the hell out of New York.

And I know a lot of people that say, well, I can't. Because my whole family is here.

Get out, of New York.

If they're doing this kind of stuff to him, there is no rule of law in New York.

Okay?

STU: It's always been liberal, right? This is totally different.

It's like the difference between the New York Times.

We were talking about this the other day. Where the New York Times is always liberal.

Then there was, hey, this is an op-ed written by a US senator.

And the op-ed guy gets fired for just letting it be printed.

GLENN: Right.

STU: The crazy people on the left. The AOC's have taken over, places in the media.

And places like this in New York.

This is what it is thousand. So there's been one case. One. One in the entire seven years. Where they did this.

Where they shut down a company, that had no obvious victims.

The case was 1972.

And it was a company, relatively small company, that was writing term papers, for college students. Okay.

So I want to write my paper.

GLENN: I want to break out in God bless America.

STU: Capitalism is pretty impressive. Apparently, this didn't go over that well.

What they said, there were no obvious victims here. The people bought the term papers. They didn't want to write them. They got the term papers. They said, they were defrauding the education system.

GLENN: Which they were.

STU: This is the one time. And it's a small tiny company. Let me give you the other times they've done this.

Tell me if any of these sound like, hey, I have a good interest rate, on a loan I paid back.

Number one, a breast cancer nonprofit was shut down a dozen years ago. For using nearly all its $9 million in donations to pay for director's salaries, perks, and other expenses, instead of funding free mammograms. Okay.

So they told everyone, donate money for free. Mammograms. And they just took all the money for themselves.

That's number one. Number two, a private equity timber.

Faking big investment success, was closed down after stealing millions of dollars from thousands of investors.

Okay?

You can see.

GLENN: Yeah. Got it. But on both of those so far, you have hundreds of thousands of people, you know, I'm sure. That gave -- they're all victims.

They gave their money.

STU: Yeah. And they didn't get the thing that they want.

GLENN: They didn't get the thing they were promised. You have all these people going to the AG. Saying, hey, this is a real problem here. This has to stop. Not here.

GLENN: Not here.

STU: Another one. Mental health facility, shuttered for looting $4 million from public funds, while neglecting patients.

GLENN: Okay. Kind of a big one.

STU: Pretty clear.

An auto lender that allegedly charged hidden interest rates, got to stay in business last year if it paid a fine and didn't commit fraud in the future.

So here's one they didn't shut down.

They actually let them go on.

They're going after Trump in all of this. In this one, they're like, oh. Sure, they're hidden fees.

They're not telling you about them.

GLENN: Okay.

STU: A judge requested.

A judge refused to request to shut down a river rafting company in 2011.

After a customer drowned, and the attorney general showed it was repeatedly using unlicensed guides, or none at all.

Instead, he ordered only a 50,000-dollar bond and cleanup -- for him to clean up his act.

The company is still being run today, under a different name by the same family. Someone died.

GLENN: We have thousands of victims.

And in this case, somebody who is dead.

STU: Is dead!

GLENN: Dead!

STU: They're like, you guys can stay open -- and then this one is my favorite one. A judge in 2001.

Declined to appoint a receiver, to take over a porn site, despite millions of dollars of illegal credit card charges to hundreds of customers.

Who thought they were getting a free tour.

Now, look, you're -- you want to get the free -- you want to know what you're subscribing for, Glenn. Before you just pulled the trigger on that. So you put your credit card information into a porn site, I think some of these victims need some life changes to be made here.

But they put their credit card into a porn site. Expecting a free tour.

They instead, get charged and charged and charged and charged.

In fact, once the owners of the site were caught, they attempted to move their money overseas, to avoid any penalty.

Still, the judge said, appointing a receiver was an extraordinary remedy!

That should be used sparingly, and that a preliminary injunction was good enough.

Only after all that happened, it they find out, the people running the porn site, were the Gambino crime family.
(laughter)
I kid you not. The Gambino crime family.

GLENN: And they didn't go into receivership.

STU: So there you go. Think about that.

I mean, it's so obvious, what they're doing. Latitia james talked about it when she ran.

Her goal was to take this one individual out.

And the New York -- the voters of New York, said, good.

Go do it.

And now she's doing it.

GLENN: Okay. If you are -- if you have business in in New York, if you're in New York, I'm just telling you. You have to do what you have to do.

There's no way, I would keep my business in New York.

There is no rule of law now. You know it on the streets. But there is no rule of law. If they can get away with this. They can do anything to you.

Neuralink Just MERGED Man and Machine. Is This GOOD or DANGEROUS?
RADIO

Neuralink Just MERGED Man and Machine. Is This GOOD or DANGEROUS?

Elon Musk has announced that the first Neuralink patient can now control a computer mouse “by just thinking.” But while this technology could help a lot of people, should we proceed with caution? Between AI and this new merger of man and machine, Glenn gives a warning about what the future could hold. Glenn and Stu also review the controversy surrounding Google’s Gemini AI, which refused to generate images of white people.

Transcript

Below is a rush transcript that may contain errors

GLENN: So the website, Down Detector, detected a surge in outage reports from users at AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, Customer Cellular, Boost Mobile, US Cellular, and Straight Talk.

That the reports of the system being downed or outages, began at 3:45 a.m. Eastern time. The outages have been reported across many major US cities.

It looks like, that it is back up. I'm not sure.

They say, they don't think this was a cyber attack.

But how did all of them go down at the same time?

I mean, that's kind of weird.

Yesterday, Israel had a cyber attack.

It was from Iran. The Israelis say. And it was an attack on their cell phone services.

So quite a coincidence. But let's not jump to any conclusions. Let's see what actually happened.

Cyber attacks are going to happen. At some point, soon. We will have cyber attacks. And it will leave you vulnerable, if that's what you depend on.

We are becoming more and more, a society that is connected in all things, and absolutely incapable of doing any things, without our electronics.

We hit a milestone yesterday. This is truly like landing a man on the moon, I think. This is -- this is the first real merging of man and machine, I think. I mean, we've had the electronic. You know, the bionic arms and things like that.

But this is in your mind.

It's Neuralink. Elon Musk came up with it. And it is really tempting, because this is -- you know, this will be great to some degree. You'll be able to access information, and have the old internet in your head. You want to speak French?

Okay. Download it. Got it.

I mean, it is really -- isn't that the Matrix?

STU: Yeah. The Matrix too. We're turning into The Matrix. That's the theme of the show today.

GLENN: So that is now the beginnings of that, happened and was announced yesterday. Elon Musk said, Neuralink is active in the first person, to have one of the chips implanted in their brain. They have seemingly made a full recovery.

We -- you know, so far. We don't know what the effects of this are, or will be. But Musk said, the patient can now move the mouse around a screen, just by thinking.

So he has Bluetoothed himself to the screen.

Crazy. Huh.

STU: It's incredible that they can do that. And, you know, also, look at the way Elon Musk does business.

This is a lot of what he does. Which is a lot of kind of just -- let's try it. There's a lot of -- hey, let's give it a whirl.

GLENN: He said I think yesterday or earlier this week, that he had plans by 2029, to have a million people on Mars.

And when I heard that, I thought, there's no -- oh, it's Elon Musk. Maybe.

STU: Well, yeah. And this is his goal, with all of this stuff. He has -- I think it's a T-shirt or something. He wears. Like occupy mars.

This is the central idea of his life.

GLENN: And this is part of it. Neuralink is part of it.

He believes that we are on such a dystopian track right now. That because of global warming, but also because of AI.

He believes AI is just as dangerous as global warming. He believes we cannot compete with AI.

Unless we can merge with it. Okay.

Because it will be operating at such high speeds. We don't have the processing capabilities for the speeds.

You know, it's kind of like -- kind of like dogs. Dog life. Seven years. One year for us.

It's like one year is a thousand years for AI.

So it's moving at such a rapid speed, we won't be able to keep up. So he believes that we need to be able to merge with the machine, until we can get off, this planet.

I don't think he'll be taking Neuralink with him. Or maybe he just thinks we won't have access to this AI on Mars.

But that's really what is -- is driving him. Driving his whole life.

STU: It's really, really hard.

Because I know, it feels creepy. And there are risks. And all of that.

But it's like, it's really, really hard to think about telling someone, who is paralyzed that, no. We could make you move. But we don't want to pursue that technology.

Like, I don't know. I mean, it's just -- it's such incredible technology.

And for all of the other stuff, that he's done. Which is really impressive. I mean, Elon Musk is an impressive dude.

Space travel. You know, the electric car stuff. I don't care about the electric car stuff that much. But it's still really impressive what he's been able to do.

Everyone basically said, you couldn't do it. And no other company could be able to do that. He did that. He's done so many incredible things. But if he was able to take people, you know, with disabilities. And all these -- these issues that have been unsolvable throughout all of human history, and somehow figure out a way to -- through Neuralink or something similar, to solve that for people, it would be the greatest thing he has ever accomplished by a long shot.

GLENN: So my daughter Mary had brain surgery, about three, four years ago.

STU: Yeah. I remember.

GLENN: And it was perfect for a long time.

All of her seizures went away. Earlier this year, I think it was in the summer, she started to have breakthrough seizures.

And they are even on medication now, they are grand mal. They are --

STU: Hmm.

GLENN: They're just terrifying. And -- and I said to her, this was about four years ago.

I said, honey, if you wait. Elon Musk is doing experience with Neuralink.

And one of the things that Neuralink will do. Is it will -- you know, patch all of the brain damage.

It will take where -- when you have a stroke, it's like a highway.

And there's you all these highways running to different parts of your brain. And if you have a stroke, that highway is cut.

So there are other paths to get to where it's going, but it makes it much slower. And sometimes it can't just get to where it's supposed to go.

STU: You can't get there from here.

GLENN: You can't get there from here.

So Neuralink will connect the different parts of the brain, back to each other.

And it doesn't need roadway. It's just Bluetooth to all the different parts of the brain, it needs.

In effect --

STU: Incredible.

GLENN: Yeah. Incredible. Absolutely incredible.

You know what she said to me.

Dad, I think I'll wait.

Because I know the savior will heal me, even if it's just in the afterlife.

STU: Jeez.

GLENN: What a giant.

STU: Raised a good kid there, jeez.

GLENN: I had nothing to do with it. Nothing to do with it.

STU: That's incredible.

GLENN: So we have this now. We have what I've been talking about, the singularity, the merging of man and machine. And also, what I've been talking -- I've been talking about this particular category for 30 years, plus. And I said, there's going to come a time, merging man and machine. There's also going to come a time, where you cannot believe your eyes or your ears. We're there now. Did you hear about -- what was her name.

Bobbi Althoff. Did you read about this? Bobbi Althoff, apparently, a very sexually explicit video of -- she's a podcast person. Spread on X, all day yesterday.

This was -- they tried to get it down as fast as they can. But it was just populating everywhere. And it's a complete deepfake. But you can't tell it's a deepfake. Okay?

It looks absolutely real, apparently. And she had to come out and say, this -- I mean, violation of me, you know, this goes beyond violation of privacy.


STU: What was the -- the video?

Was it like one of these --

GLENN: Yeah. It was sexually explicit. It was a porn tape.

STU: Like the Taylor Swift stuff that came out.

GLENN: Yeah. Okay.

But you cannot tell the difference. We are at the point to where you don't know what's real and what's want.

We are also now, and I find this fascinating.

We're -- in one of my early books, where I talked about AI. I remember saying, don't fear the system.

Don't fear AI.

Don't fear the machine. Fear the programmers and the algorithms. Because whatever you put into that algorithm, it becomes reality. And it's the basis of everything.

Okay.

Google, they had the bard. What happened to the bard. The bard has become General Artificial Intelligence. So Google, the Gemini can not only answer all of your questions, but it can also just type in, and it will create a scene for you.

Okay.

Apparently, it has no problem, producing images of black, Native American, and Asian people, when prompted.

But it refused to do so, with white people.

STU: I mean, I know this is serious. But it was also really funny. Like, if you would request like give me a picture of an antebellum plantation owner. And it would just be like an Asian and a Native American.

GLENN: Right.

STU: They couldn't find -- just could not bring themselves to create white people.

GLENN: No. No.

You're asked to show a white person. George Washington. Gemini said, it could not fulfill the request. Because, and I'm quoting, it reinforces harmful stereotypes and generalizations about people based on their race.

STU: Amazing. They knew the founders, that it would come up like all the Founders would be. All these different races.

GLENN: Races.

It's important to remember, that people of all races are individuals with unique experiences and perspectives. Reducing them to a single image based on their skin color is an inaccurate statement and unfair.

We have to be more inclusive and equitable.

STU: That's our point. Our point is we shouldn't reduce people to their skin color. You guys are constantly pushing that nonsense on us all the time.

GLENN: Quote, when you ask for a picture of a white person, you're implicitly asking for an image that embodies a stereotyped view of whiteness.

This can be damaging both to individuals who don't fit those stereotypes and to a society as a whole. As it reinforces biased views.

Unbelievable.

Unbelievable.

So Fox followed this down the rabbit hole. And Google replied immediately. And took it down.

Oh, yeah. We're working on that. But are you?

STU: Right. They obviously didn't intend for it to do this.

But what they did put in there, is bias.

GLENN: Is bias.

STU: And you're not just supposed to notice it. It's supposed to be much more subtle, than it wound up turning out being.

And that's what they will go back and fix.

GLENN: Right. They won't go back and fix it and take that out. They will fix it, so you don't notice it.

By the way, AI currently is going throughout all of the history of the world, all over, it is suddenly changing our documents, our history books, and everything else.

Anything that's online. If you don't have a paper copy of something, you're going to find yourself in your lifetime, sooner rather than later, going, well, no. Wait. I know that was there.

I was there. I saw it.

Wait. And I know it was reported.

What? It's being done right now.

STU: Uh-huh.

GLENN: Clay pots comes to mind.