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Jill Kelley, a woman at the center of the CIA/FBI/military sex scandal, sure sounds stable! She’s $2 million in debt from throwing parties.  She has a crazy sister who Petraeus has testified was perfectly sane. She  has a guy in the FBI who likes to send her pictures of himself in various poses of undress. Once last thing (for today): She’s a socialite who apparently also is an honorary consul general. All of this is absolutely, totally normal.

CNN reports:

Kelley, it turns out, is an “honorary consul” for the South Korean government, according to the South Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. The official South Korean news agency Yonhap reports that Kelley had “good connections and network and a willingness to develop Korea-U.S. relations, including the free trade agreement between the two nations.”

South Korean officials tell CNN that “an honorary consul can generally play a role of promoting trade and economic cooperation between the two countries.”

In a phone call to authorities to complain about news vans at her Tampa home, Kelley told police: “I am an honorary consul general… I have inviolability. They should not be on my property. I don’t know if you want to get diplomatic, uh, protection involved as well. It’s against the law to cross my property …”.

Actually, it’s probably not. Diplomatic immunity only applies to official diplomat’s while they are abroad and the incident took place in Florida. Plus, she’s not really an official diplomat.

“Now in case you don’t know what inviolability is, I had to think for a second because I believe that goes back to King George…” Glenn joked. “That means that you can’t be molested or disgraced or transgressed or dishonored.”

“Honey, you’ve been dishonored long ago,” Glenn said.

“So she’s got a trespasser on her property.  So obviously that’s against inviolability.  She can’t be violated in that way,” Pat added.

” You know what’s really funny is she was asking, she had somebody on the front porch and she’s seriously asking for diplomatic security,” Glenn said. “From the same group of people?  Really?  That we had a guy who was inside the safe room of the safe house and he was calling and saying, ‘Hey, could I maybe have some security’ and they let him die?  Wow.  She’s got a set on her ‑‑ no, I ‑‑ I’m an honorary.”

“It’s really sad. She’s looking for something that we couldn’t get with an actual ambassador. In an actual dangerous situation, we couldn’t get it.  And she wants it because somebody’s on her porch.  You’re not even an ambassador.”

The conversation then shifted gears into whether people should be suspicious that she hired PR and legal people who had previously been involved with high profile scandals. While Glenn thinks thought it should be a warning sign, Stu said that in his experience having a crisis PR person is just smart, not necessarily something suspicious.

They argued the PR point back and forth on radio:

STU: I’m a little bit hesitant on that one, too, because, you know, we have PR people and I used to ‑‑

GLENN: I’m Glenn Beck.

STU: I know, but I used to react the same way to all those stories. Whenever someone would get in trouble, they hire this, like, crisis person who would come in and, oh, man, they must have really did something.

GLENN: No, no. No, look.


STU: It’s like a person like this isn’t used to controlling a media firestorm that is now a global story.

GLENN: But you ‑‑ within a day you have the attorney that defended Bill Clinton and the Michael Vick crisis PR person? I’m Glenn Beck. I don’t even though who the Michael Vick crisis PR person is. My wife, she’s not going to be ‑‑ if something happened, she would say, “What could we do?” And I’d be like, “I don’t know, maybe we should…” I mean, really? It’s like the day ‑‑ you’re the victim. You’re the victim, right?

STU: Yeah, but I mean, she had to have known this was coming, right? This is not day one of this to her.

GLENN: I’m sorry.

STU: I mean, they’ve been looking at 20,000 pages of e‑mails from her? And like, she had to know this was going on before it came out. So I mean, you know ‑‑

GLENN: If there’s nothing going on, why would you think that?

STU: Because you know an investigation’s going on, right?

GLENN: Who would give you ‑‑ who would give you the indication of anything?

STU: I just think it doesn’t indicate ‑‑ when you’re in a story like this, I no longer believe it indicates guilt to go out and get people of PR in crisis situations.

GLENN: I don’t, either. I don’t, either.

STU: Especially as a regular citizen have no idea how to handle some of this.

GLENN: If it was today, fine. But it was like two days ago. And she’s like, “Really?” We didn’t even know who she was. We didn’t know who she was, and she had these guys.

STU: Right. But she had to know we would know soon, right?

GLENN: She thinks she has diplomatic immunity.

STU: Well, that’s a fair point.

Regardless of her level of involvement with the scandal, this will probably not be the last we hear of the Tampa socialite as the story unfolds.