Who has Edmund Burke’s prayer Bible?

It’s no secret that Glenn has been collecting various important artifacts from history – especially ones that progressive historians would rather forget. Edmund Burke is generally considered the founder of conservatism and he is also noted for supporting the American Revolutionaries. Burke was once given a Bible as a gift from George II -and guess who has it now.

“This was a gift from George II, and we have George III’s Bible as well. You wouldn’t ‑‑ you wouldn’t believe some of the things, and this was given to us because this was ‑‑ they had all of these universities in all of these places that they could have donated these Bibles and this collection to, but they wanted to make sure that it would actually be seen by the people and that it would be used so people could be educated, and correct me if I’m wrong, understand our history and what got us here. And I don’t even know these people. I haven’t met them or anything, and this came as a surprise to me last week and it is shocking, and we’ll show you some of the things,” Glenn said.

“It’s really an exciting, exciting time. I can’t wait to tell you when we have time about some things that happened to me this weekend. I saw a movement out of California and Phoenix, Arizona that I’m telling you is God‑inspired and it is incredible. There are big things on the horizon that people are doing all over the country, and you’re just not going to be able to put the Genie in the bottle, and we’ll go into it in just a little by in the coming days here.”

  • http://youtu.be/0iRCvDwF26Q Sam Fisher

    I wished people sent me cool stuff like this but then again I would not have a safe place to put it. History needs to be preserved for all time and historical documents like this will do that. Liberal historians are rewriting history to fit their needs but what they did not count on are people with long memories that remember history before the rewrite and the books and letters written by historical figures coming out.

  • Anonymous

    I hope this wonderful gift receives better care than did Orson Welles’ fishbowl.

    just sayin’… :)

  • Anonymous

    Glenn, speaking as someone who worked in the archive section of a library during college, please, please, PLEASE put on 100% cotton archival gloves when you touch that Bible!   No matter how clean someone’s hands are, there are acids and oils on human skin that can easily damage it.  The gloves can be purchased online (even Amazon carries them) and they are cheap.

  • Anonymous

    I agree with you to a point. But we must remember that in order to fully understand history we must be able to sense the presence of history. In this case here is an artifact that was meant to be touched, to be held, to be read. By placing it in a glass case and denying everyone the right to touch it means that we deny ourselves the ability to physically touch the past. Now I don’t suggest that such an artifact be left on a table for anyone to pick up. But I do believe that it should be made available under certain circumstances. By touching it, even if only occasionally we keep it alive and meaningful. We add new fingerprints to those many, many fingerprints that have come before and thus we leave our own mark on the past, just as the past leaves its mark on us.

    I have an extensive private collection of Children’s literature, some of which are quite valuable and there are few joys that go as deep as seeing a child touch a book that has been touched by children for 80 years, or a hundred or two hundred years. It quite literally pulls them into a different frame of mind.

    I like to say… Everyone should run their fingers across the marble that is Michelangelo’s David once. Over time it may indeed wear it down to nothing, but it was nothing before human hands touched it to begin with. Far better to wear it down in the creation of new hands to build new Davids than to keep it safe for all time, separated from human contact.