Photo by Paige Perry

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“Yesterday I completed my television show at 5:00 and I… I walked off the air, and the head of Mercury One said to me, ‘Glenn, just a devastating tornado in Oklahoma in a little town called Moore, Oklahoma’,” Glenn said on radio this morning.

“Joe came to me and he said ‘Devastation’.  I said, ‘Well, I think we should get there as soon as we can.'”

“So last night I tweeted:  Does anybody, anybody have a couple of tractor‑trailers we can borrow for the night?  And about 9:30 last night my team was packed and ready to go and the tractor‑trailers that had been supplied really by a local church were already at the gates of a place called Operation Blessing.  It’s an organization that we have helped fill the pantries of and they have helped deliver food for different things whenever there’s been a crisis.  We couldn’t use their trucks this time because they were all on the East Coast and it would be a couple of days.  We knew that here in this little teeny town in Oklahoma, there were people that needed food and water and just whatever it is that we need to run our life every day.  They needed it not in a couple of days but last night, early this morning.  So we loaded up the trucks, two eighteen‑wheelers and four SUVs hit the road last night about 11:00.  We arrived here about 4:00 a.m.”

Photo by Mark Mabry
Photo by Mark Mabry
Photo by Mark Mabry

“And so we pull up to the place that is kind of the Epicenter for anybody who is hungry, anybody who is in need, anybody who needs a bed, anybody who needs someplace to gather together as a family because they’ve lost everything. It’s the First Baptist Church here in Moore. And we pulled up, I don’t know, about 4:00 or 5:00 this morning. They just finished unloading the second truck about 20 minutes ago,” Glenn continued.

Photo by Paige Perry
Photo by Paige Perry

“As I went to see the devastation early this morning before the sun was up, it was raining again and lightning was streaking across the sky, and a woman came up to me. Surprising how many people are just wearing flip‑flops, wearing pajamas, wearing anything that they happened to have on. And she came up to me in her flip‑flops and her T‑shirt and she said, is this where we can get food? Is there going to be breakfast served here? And I said, “Yes, ma’am. I don’t know all the details, but I think it’s right on the other side of the church building is where you can get a hot meal.”

Photo by Paige Perry

“We drove past all of the places that were reporters. All the reporters are kind of outside a specific zone. Some of them have been allowed into this hospital here I’ll tell you about here in a second. But most of them are sitting outside of the zone. Police have stopped all of them from coming in. I can understand why. Like vultures they circled this building last night. Like vultures they circled this building this morning wanting to get an interview with one of the family members who had lost a child last night. People from the police and fire and sheriffs, churches, the volunteers sickened by them,” Glenn said.

Photo by Paige Perry

“We went through the barricades and we did a different group of interviews this morning. I think if you need a sobbing parent to tell you what it was like to lose their child within a couple of hours after losing their child, I think there’s something wrong with you. Instead while everybody else is here in their battle fatigues trying to look like “We’re really important and we’re going to tell you exactly what happened,” we quietly went around with our cameras and our microphones and I just talked to the people that were coming from different states, people who had come in from their churches, people who had come in from their firehouses, people who heard about it and just called somebody and said ‘We’ve got to go and help.'”

Photo by Paige Perry

“I went and I talked to the district manager of the Home Depot because there in the midst of the devastation, on one side of the street is a strip mall that has just been devastation, cause blown through the windows, nothing on the roof, trees stripped of their bark. And on the other side is the Home Depot.”

Photo by Paige Perry
Photo by Paige Perry

“Home Depot opened their doors, kept them open for the First Responders and anybody that needed anything. You need a shovel, you need a flashlight, you need some plywood? What do you need? The cash registers were locked. The cash registers were turned off.”

Photo by Mark Mabry

“You see, I found something interesting this morning. I found that the State was here. I found that the local was here, found the sheriff’s department, the police departments, I found the fire departments from several different states. One national organization that I did recognize. I noticed that the Salvation Army was here. They were feeding the First Responders. I didn’t see FEMA. I saw the National Guard, but that’s under the direction of the governor. I didn’t see the FEMA trucks yet. Perhaps they’re here. But what I did see are the churches, the pastors, the priests, the people of faith.

“I ran into a guy from Dallas, Texas. What was the name of that, the Minutemen. The Minutemen from Dallas, Texas. They said they went up to help the people at the last hurricane. They said they learned a lot. And the thing they learned about, the thing they really realized is here are men that are supposed to be good Christian men who sat in their pews. They sat in their pews and they didn’t really do a lot. They read the scriptures and they said their prayers and they took care of their families and they ran their businesses, but they weren’t really involved. And then Joplin happened.”

Photo by Paige Perry

“And when Joplin happened, they decided, ‘We have to go help,’ and they did. And when they were there, they realized, ‘We’re not fast enough. We’re not prepared enough.’ And so this group of businessmen, this group of Christian men got together and started something called the Minutemen. You’ll meet them tonight on television. An amazing idea.”

“I told them we would sit down and talk because they are exactly the kind of people that Mercury One wants to find and help fund. They’re exactly the kind of people that you need to hear the story because there should be Minutemen all around the country.”

“I got a lot of heat on Twitter last night for saying that we’re the First Responders. ‘Who does Glenn Beck think he is?’ I don’t know. An American citizen. That’s who I think I am. I don’t know. A Christian. You’re right, I’m not FEMA. I actually wear that as a badge of honor and I think everybody here should wear that as a badge of honor as well. We’re here because we love each other. We’re here because we’re an American. We’re here because, don’t you want to feel for your fellow man?”

Photo by Mark Mabry
Photo by Mark Mabry
Photo by Mark Mabry
Photo by Mark Mabry

“I’m sitting in an upper room at this church now, this conference room with big glass windows and I’m looking at the gray sky of Oklahoma, the traffic that is stuck on the interstate, and I’m seeing a big water tank that says “Moore, Home of Toby Keith.” Even though I know Toby, even though I know Toby listens, even though I have pictured him listening, writing his songs in his head while he’s driving that tractor, I still won’t think of Moore as the home of Toby Keith. I’ll think of Moore as one incredible town that knows what America is supposed to be like. That knows you don’t give up, you don’t pack it in, you don’t walk away, you don’t wait, you don’t make a sign that says “help.” You help each other. You help yourself. Makes you stronger. Moore isn’t the home of Toby Keith. Moore is just one great town in Oklahoma where a country singer happens to live.”

“Last night I’m proud to say that our audience is so amazing. Last night on Twitter and Facebook, I suggested that if you knew of somebody that could provide a truck or two, we sure would like their help. And that you could donate. 100% of the proceeds if you donate to MercuryOne.org now, you click on the tornado disaster relief. Every dollar raised will go, 100% will go to Moore and that’s one of the reasons why we’re on the ground now, to see where that money should go. Who needs it? Who’s not going to waist your money? Who’s going to make the most of that dollar? I would urge you to go to MercuryOne.org now and donate. I’m proud to say it’s now up to $121,000 and we haven’t even mentioned it on the air yet.”

Photo by Mark Mabry
Photo by Mark Mabry
Photo by Mark Mabry