Glenn remembers JFK

On radio this morning, Glenn marked the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination by reflecting on JFK’s legacy and pondering how we would be accepted in today’s political climate.

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Today is the 50th anniversary of the assassination of JFK. We mark the death of JFK as a profound change and an acceleration of our country into darkness. It only takes one event like this to change the world, and this death changed the world.

Make no mistake: JFK was getting ready to run for his second term. He didn’t really have any big accomplishments. He is not a guy that was going to be remembered in the history books. Camelot is not true. Camelot is something that was changed after the fact. That was Jackie Kennedy. He had Bay of Pigs. He did bring us through the Cuban missile crisis, but he’s not a guy that had accomplished an awful lot.

What was it? What was it that he did do? He had us look up. He had us think big. He had us dream, against all odds. The people in the 1960s that I know, it sounds strange for my kids to even understand, but we didn’t think we could go to the moon. The people who are living at that time, who are our age now, they didn’t think that they could go to the moon. We take it for granted. We look at it now and my son doesn’t understand why we haven’t been to Mars. Everything’s possible now. It wasn’t back then. And so when he stood there in front of Congress and said, “I have a goal that within this decade we land a man on the moon and return him home safely,” that was outrageous.

So who was JFK? He’s been coopted by the left, but would people like Orrin Hatch, would people like Mitch McConnell even accept a man like John F. Kennedy today? You see, the left will say that, “Well, of course he would be right there with the left today.” Well, he might be because when you boil a frog, as long as the water is tepid when he gets in, right? But if you do it slowly, he’ll be boiled. But if it’s hot, he’ll jump out I contend that the water would be so hot right now that JFK, if you could bring him back, if you could bring back the politician that JFK was, he wouldn’t be accepted by the Republican Party because he would be a TEA Party radical. He wouldn’t even recognize what this country had become. And I’m basing that on his words.

  • Big Jim

    Glenn’s commentary on JFK is both weak and a joke.

    Take Gerald Celente, for example, now there’s a man who is worth listening to on JFK’s 50th anniversary assassination day. Gerald actually met with Gov Connally ( the guy riding with JFK when he was shot. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JIbKWBfC8k#t=45

    Bill Still is another clued-in guy. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBFHNWAIePA

    Dr. Paul Craig Roberts is yet another man who is telling it like it is: http://www.paulcraigroberts.org/2013/11/21/kennedy-assassination-november-22-1963-50-years-later/

    Alex Jones is actually down in Dealey Plaza, right now, calling out the government and the MSM whores on all of their deceitfulness.

    Think about this: If the U.S. government had a hand in killing JFK, a sitting president, then any conspiracy— no matter how evil— is not beyond the machinations of the U.S. government.
    JFK should make every man and woman stop and think just what the U.S. government is really up to.

  • http://www.artinphoenix.com/gallery/grimm snowleopard (cat folk gallery)

    Well done Glenn, well done.

    JFK’s legacy and imagery have become so distorted and rewritten due to the machinations of the left, who are desperate for heroes and martyrs. This shows the true depths of corruption and lies the left will resort to in their ever-growing desperation for power and control.

  • ThorsteinVeblen2012

    By extension we can also consider Robert and Ted Kennedy conservatives as well since they shared much of the same “conservative” philosophy.

  • Anonymous

    Robert maybe: Ted was no JFK or Robert. JFK cut taxes, promoted incentive, opportunity, encouraged volunteers to help, and love for country. He inspired a generation of Americans like Glen said. Obama ended the shuttle program, makes every attempt possible to diminish and belittle America’s greatness, and encourages a government dominated welfare society of victims which he holds in high esteem for their votes. Obama was Ted’s man.

  • Anonymous

    Because he was the last decent democrat to serve in office…that is why we remember him and honor his legacy. The democrat party as we knew it died on that day!

  • Anonymous

    Ted was the asp of the family….nothing like his two older brothers.

  • Mike Nelson

    This is a good interview with Celente; I’m not sure how someone gave this post a down vote.

  • Anonymous

    The video started out good and built up my expectations but I ended up disappointed. It was not really worth the time to watch.

  • Big Jim

    “I’m not sure how someone gave this post a down vote.”

    Because “someone” buys into all of the MSM crap that gets excreted onto the public on a daily basis.
    Glenn actually did a poor job at recycling the MSM’s feel-good ancillary propaganda which has been repeated over and over again for years.
    He wrongly concludes that JFK’s term was insignificant. The fact is JFK opposed a nuclear war with the Soviet Union— a war that many Republicans wanted very badly. He opposed war with Vietnam. JFK opposed and/or was reluctant about a lot of things which made him some powerful enemies inside the U.S. government.

    Jesse Ventura’s book on the subject, for example, is worth more than anything Glenn will ever say.

    “They Killed Our President: 63 Reasons to Believe There Was a Conspiracy to Assassinate JFK”

    http://www.amazon.com/They-Killed-Our-President-Assassinate/dp/1626361398

  • Anonymous

    He hated the communists, therefore he was wiser than any Liberal dreamer today!

  • Anonymous

    You are completely right!!!

  • Anonymous

    the guy was a drug and sex addict. they couldn’t have covered that up in today’s media world. he was president for a short time. today he would be a 95 year old recovering sex and drug addict. sometimes death, particularly assassination, is a good career move.

  • Anonymous

    Decent? How many times did he cheat on his wife? Was Marylyn Monroe assassinated because of JFK? Decent,,,I don’t think so.

  • Anonymous

    I think we can all agree separating a man’s policy from his personal life is crucial. We live in an imperfect world. JFK, as the leader of the free world at the time, is a far better leader than who we currently have, regardless of his indisgressions. Obama…. There is lots still to be learned about this president.

  • Igor Shafarevich

    Each of us must slice through the fog of nonsense conjured up by today’s liberals & progressives: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0094KY878

  • Anonymous

    I AGREE Glenn he would not recognize this country.

  • Anonymous

    I AGREE Glenn he would not recognize this country.

  • Anonymous

    I object to the statement that we didn’t think we could go to the moon, I was a college graduate with 3 1/2 years of Naval service after college and working for IBM at the time of the “moon speech” – i saw nothing impossible about it. I did think that the call for it within the calendar decade might be a bit ambitious, but ten years was a reasonable expectation.

    Too many of both left and right use the “history” books of the time to describe the people of the time. I was born in 1935 in NYC. I entered Princeton in 1953 and graduated in 1957. I am a charter member of the “silent generation”. But the silent generation is a fiction, the book was written by a sociology professor at Princeton and his subjects were all members of my class of 1957. They were anonymous in the book, but I could name each one of them by the descriptions of their backgrounds. They were not silent in the sense that the professor implied, they were listening and learning and thinking critically. The Princeton of my day had mainly liberal professors but, unlike today, they entertained full discussion in their courses. I was “taught” nothing in college, the professors may have had an opinion but they didn’t have an agenda. Oops, there was one in sociology that did, I won’t name him but he wasn’t taken seriously. Had I parroted a professor’s views I would have gotten a C – countering him with argument was the best way to an A. Sadly, those times are gone.

    It was another day in another way – the professors actually taught the lectures and classes. I had Samuelson for economics and argued with him. He was able to disagree with my conclusions yet grade me hlghly for my logic and understanding.

    We were not a silent generation, we just didn’t shout it out in the streets. Pardon my diatribe but I’m a bit tired of those who use the contemporary histories to categorize a time – and in this particular article Glenn is guilty of that, but I forgive him . I knew a lot about JFK, the family of my girl friend of the time were close to the Kennedy’s socially (not politically). I voted for him as I thought he would do nothing and Nixon would do the wrong thing – boy, was I wrong,

    At this 50th anniversary of the assasination may i offer credit to JFK – he was learning his job on the job and probably would have become a good President. There was a noticeable change in the man on the death of his child – both as man and as President.

    As long as I’ve gone this far I might as well add more. He should have been Court Martialed for the PT109 incident rather than given a medal. He saved lives after the incident, but he caused it by lying to in the middle of a channel with his engines shut down and no lookout in a combat zone, even though it was a back side zone from the combat. That is another story.

    I think the man was finally growing when he was killed, I see no growth in our current President.

  • Anonymous

    I object to the statement that we didn’t think we could go to the moon, I was a college graduate with 3 1/2 years of Naval service after college and working for IBM at the time of the “moon speech” – i saw nothing impossible about it. I did think that the call for it within the calendar decade might be a bit ambitious, but ten years was a reasonable expectation.

    Too many of both left and right use the “history” books of the time to describe the people of the time. I was born in 1935 in NYC. I entered Princeton in 1953 and graduated in 1957. I am a charter member of the “silent generation”. But the silent generation is a fiction, the book was written by a sociology professor at Princeton and his subjects were all members of my class of 1957. They were anonymous in the book, but I could name each one of them by the descriptions of their backgrounds. They were not silent in the sense that the professor implied, they were listening and learning and thinking critically. The Princeton of my day had mainly liberal professors but, unlike today, they entertained full discussion in their courses. I was “taught” nothing in college, the professors may have had an opinion but they didn’t have an agenda. Oops, there was one in sociology that did, I won’t name him but he wasn’t taken seriously. Had I parroted a professor’s views I would have gotten a C – countering him with argument was the best way to an A. Sadly, those times are gone.

    It was another day in another way – the professors actually taught the lectures and classes. I had Samuelson for economics and argued with him. He was able to disagree with my conclusions yet grade me hlghly for my logic and understanding.

    We were not a silent generation, we just didn’t shout it out in the streets. Pardon my diatribe but I’m a bit tired of those who use the contemporary histories to categorize a time – and in this particular article Glenn is guilty of that, but I forgive him . I knew a lot about JFK, the family of my girl friend of the time were close to the Kennedy’s socially (not politically). I voted for him as I thought he would do nothing and Nixon would do the wrong thing – boy, was I wrong,

    At this 50th anniversary of the assasination may i offer credit to JFK – he was learning his job on the job and probably would have become a good President. There was a noticeable change in the man on the death of his child – both as man and as President.

    As long as I’ve gone this far I might as well add more. He should have been Court Martialed for the PT109 incident rather than given a medal. He saved lives after the incident, but he caused it by lying to in the middle of a channel with his engines shut down and no lookout in a combat zone, even though it was a back side zone from the combat. That is another story.

    I think the man was finally growing when he was killed, I see no growth in our current President.

  • Anonymous

    Just as the sycophant liberal historians and mythologists JFK surrounded himself with were capable of creating the grand illusion that was JFK, the social historians of the later 60s succeeded in mythologizing their own generation as more important than the half generation that preceeded it. The 60s were transformational in exactly what way positive, I continue to wonder? I guess we got legitimate environmental protection and the enforcement of previously denied civil rights. In contrast, without your generation, there was no Gemini or Apollo program; no computer advancement and indeed the technology that the environmental movement later claimed as their own.
    We are all taught that Kennedy was a great leader in the Bay of Pigs (for taking fault) and the Cuban Missile Crisis. My understanding is that the Bay of Pigs was the highest risk for no possible reward venture and that at least 8 other, more clandestine attempts were orchestrated on Castro’s life. I have also read that Kennedy almost manufactured the missle crisis on his own for poltical gain. We were not in the oval office for those meetings, so we will never know.
    I agree with your assessment that JFK was growing on the job. And by way of contrast, I have just finished reading Robert Caro’s most recent installment on LBJ–the Passage to Power. Whatever one thinks of LBJ (and his escalation of Kennedy’s start in Vietnam), I tend to agree with Caro’s assessment that Kennedy was naive when it came to moving legislation through Congress. In the three months following the assasination, LBJ was able to get through the rules blocks that the Dixiecrat and conservative Republican senators set up to stop Kennedy’s budget, tax cut and the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
    But like GB above, I ,just a child at the time of the assasination, will remember that period of a time of hope and belief in the impossible–or rather that anything was possible. History remains the province of the victors; or at least the highly compensated authors.
    Thank you for your thought and insightful post; the personal touch is also fascinating.

  • Thomas Aquinas

    A lamp of liberty, illuminating candid facts in the dark of our patient sufferance: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0094KY878