On radio this morning, Glenn marked the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination by reflecting on JFK’s legacy and pondering how we would be accepted in today’s political climate.

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Today is the 50th anniversary of the assassination of JFK. We mark the death of JFK as a profound change and an acceleration of our country into darkness. It only takes one event like this to change the world, and this death changed the world.

Make no mistake: JFK was getting ready to run for his second term. He didn’t really have any big accomplishments. He is not a guy that was going to be remembered in the history books. Camelot is not true. Camelot is something that was changed after the fact. That was Jackie Kennedy. He had Bay of Pigs. He did bring us through the Cuban missile crisis, but he’s not a guy that had accomplished an awful lot.


What was it? What was it that he did do? He had us look up. He had us think big. He had us dream, against all odds. The people in the 1960s that I know, it sounds strange for my kids to even understand, but we didn’t think we could go to the moon. The people who are living at that time, who are our age now, they didn’t think that they could go to the moon. We take it for granted. We look at it now and my son doesn’t understand why we haven’t been to Mars. Everything’s possible now. It wasn’t back then. And so when he stood there in front of Congress and said, “I have a goal that within this decade we land a man on the moon and return him home safely,” that was outrageous.

So who was JFK? He’s been coopted by the left, but would people like Orrin Hatch, would people like Mitch McConnell even accept a man like John F. Kennedy today? You see, the left will say that, “Well, of course he would be right there with the left today.” Well, he might be because when you boil a frog, as long as the water is tepid when he gets in, right? But if you do it slowly, he’ll be boiled. But if it’s hot, he’ll jump out I contend that the water would be so hot right now that JFK, if you could bring him back, if you could bring back the politician that JFK was, he wouldn’t be accepted by the Republican Party because he would be a TEA Party radical. He wouldn’t even recognize what this country had become. And I’m basing that on his words.