So what does Glenn do up on his ranch? Watch this video to find out…

Watch Searching for Grandpa’s Christmas ON DEMAND now!

What do you do on a ranch in the middle of the Mountain West when you’ve committed to no electronics and are twenty minutes away from the nearest town? Well, you learn to take care of yourself – and that involves taking care of your own nourishment.

“I’m going to be honest here, I’m no farmer,” Glenn told viewers. “My grandfather, he was a farmer, but as a kid I was much more interested in moving to the big city to do radio than cattle or farming so I never really learned. But now, for some reason, as I’m getting older – I actually want to milk a cow. And I wanted Raphe to experience it with me.”

What was it like? Watch:

Get Glenn Live! On TheBlaze TV

“I don’t know if I taught him how to do it exactly right, but what is important is he will always remember this moment. I hope it is something Raphe will tell his grandkids about. There is a freedom that is inherent in doing things for yourself, being self-sufficent, protecting yourself.”

  • Anonymous

    So, Glen, why a “home” in Texas and a “ranch” in Idaho? That don’t make no sense.
    You (Glen) ain’t tryin’ to hard to become a Texan.

  • Anonymous

    Yes, Raphe will always remember that moment when there was a camera crew filming him milking a cow on his family’s multi-million dollar ranch for content on his dad’s network. So special.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8FvmesaxXg Sam Fisher

    But you have no problem with Moore Al Gore and Obama making millions and not giving money to the poor.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8FvmesaxXg Sam Fisher

    If I where Glenn I would not be doing this on camera their are a lot of unstable liberals and anti-Mormon people coming to this site.

  • Anonymous

    They can do whatever they want with their money. I have no problem with Beck’s wealth either. People like you are free to pay him as much money as you like. I was making a minor point that the heartfelt moment in Beck’s video was acted. When camera crews and lighting are staged to capture something between a father and a son, it’s not genuine. Beck’s really teaching his son that personal moments can be used as content for a media network to make money. It all seems just a little disingenuous to me.

  • Anonymous

    Hello? Why did you not put the cow in an out building or barn? Where are the hobbles? AND you did not clean the udder first either……you do have neighbors to help you with this stuff you know. My family had a milk cow the whole time I grew up and you don’t have to milk the cow in the dark………….. ?? It is definitely a memory.
    Merry Christmas.

  • Anonymous

    Get an English speaking person to help you with your sentence structure and spelling.

  • Deb Holeman Moody

    I started milking cows when I was 6 yrs old and we always milked in a barn, used hobbles and cleaned the teets and bags if needed, but that doesn’t mean you HAVE to do it that way. The little Brown Swiss is obviously very well behaved and doesn’t need to be hobbled and if you we’re to clean her teets with water in the cold it’s very likely they would chafe and become very sore. Not happy times for the cow : ). As far as milking in the dark….it’s always best to milk at the same time twice a day. So if she’s used to being milked that early,and outside, best keep her on her schedule. @ Landree, I filmed my kids the first they milked a cow, too. It doesn’t look like there was a big film crew there, but even if there was ….so what? It looked like they were having a good time and it was an experience they will both remember, cameras or not. I was impressed by how quickly Raphe was able to get milk to come out! It is no easy task and if you think otherwise, try it yourself. Good job, Glenn. Keep teaching! Too many people think milk, and other food stuffs, come the “magic” back room in the back of their grocery store. MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!

  • http://www.itsthepits.org/ San Diego County Citizen

    “Ranch” is the covert term for “survival retreat”, and there is plenty of “sense” to have it 20 miles from the nearest town in BF Utah/Idaho. Any urban environment, even in the Great Republic of Texas, will turn into a 100 mile diameter zombie outbreak zone once the power goes out and the delivery trucks stop dropping off pallets at Walmart.

  • Anonymous

    Yeah, I milked cows as a kid, too. Very enjoyable and satisfying to interact with a calm and compliant cow. One who would stand still, in the middle of the field if necessary. Others, however, just like people, have their personality quirks. A bucket of grain to get their head in a stanchion, and put your head into their side, just in front of the haunch, so that they couldn’t lift their leg so quickly, and it also was an early warning sign that they were going to lift their leg to kick, and put their foot in the bucket, mostly full by now, and make the milk all green. (yes, it got chucked, darn it.) And then, getting swatted up side of the head with a tail matted with cockleburs, is always a nice friendly touch.

    Yeah, I loved milking cows. Taught me punctuality and dependability to be there at the same times, twice a day, to do the milking. Dad kept a small farm, I think, just to have chores and the modest fruit of our labors. Skimmed cream, churned butter, and made buttermilk soup (a Danish recipe from Grandma) that I still make, even with cultured buttermilk.

    Then there was mowing the alfalfa, and putting it in the barn, but that’s another story.

    Recipe? Quart of buttermilk, a cup of flour for thickening, cup of sugar, vanilla and lemon extract to enhance the tart with the sweet. Slowly heat to a boil, to thicken, stirring constantly to prevent scorching the dairy. Serve with a dollop of strawberry jam in the middle of the dish, with vanilla wafers on the side. Even those leery of buttermilk love it. Vary the ingredients to suit. Enjoy!

    (Gotta brag, the lemon extract and the strawberry jam was my idea.)

    Ah, the memories! Thanks, Glenn!

    Laus Deo

  • Anonymous

    I like this. Who cares if there was someone there to film it? I recall what my 4 year old daughter said the first time she saw a cow milked. “I don’t like that kind of milk. I like the kind that comes from the grocery store.” When she found out the grocery store milk came from the same place, she said “I’ll never drink another drop.”

  • Anonymous

    Delightful! Something every kid should know….but, GLENN! You need to feed your cow—she’s skin n bones. Reminded me of my own growing up: I helped my dad milk 40 of ‘em …every morning and evening. We had a ‘city family’ that were very close friends. First time they came to visit us, their daughter (about my same age) came out to the barn and watched me milk the cows. At dinner that evening, she said: “Now I know two ways to get milk: the way Mel does and at the grocery store.”

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8FvmesaxXg Sam Fisher

    Again I could care less.

  • Anonymous

    That is the poorest(skinniest) milk cow I have ever seen. How about feeding that animal.

  • Igor Shafarevich

    More dangerous than merit-based rewards is the notion of “distributive justice” that requires each of us b subjected to centralized control

  • Rosie Nanette Gagnon

    This is a dairy cow, not a beef cow. They really do look that skinny. Its just the bone structure.

  • Rosie Nanette Gagnon

    This is a dairy cow, not a beef cow. They really do look that skinny. Its just the bone structure

  • Anonymous

    Love you Glenn, we are neighbors, and say “Welcome to the simple and satisfying life of self sustaining your family”. You are a treasure to our community. Love the video. Btw take grape seed extract 5 times a day even small amounts of 50 to 100 mg will help with your condition. It’s kept me alive and functioning these past 18 years. Get a hold of me and I’ll share a wealth of knowledge. Keep up the good work, let’s build a better world.

  • Jeff H

    I would milk an old holstien every morning before school even skinnier than that. But holstiens are taller and I would set on a stool not more than just a T, tuck my head clear up in the flank and go to to town. When I was done there would be three gallons of warm milk topped by 3 inches of foam. We sepatated the cream and made our own butter but never learned to make cheese.