The ‘wussification’ of America: MLB to ban home plate collisions

Glenn is not a sports aficionado… by any stretch of the imagination… but even he could not get over a new rule that came out of Major League Baseball winter meetings yesterday.

“Can I ask you something? Nothing makes sense anymore. And I don’t know anything about sports, but the home plate collision thing – that seems ridiculously stupid,” Glenn said on radio this morning. “Again, I don’t know anything about it, but is this the wussification of America again?”

“Thank you,” Pat said. “You’re exactly right.”

The AP reports:

Pete Rose sounded bowled over.

Charlie Hustle, who famously flattened Ray Fosse to score the winning run in the 1970 All-Star game, couldn’t believe Major League Baseball intends to eliminate home-plate collisions by 2015 at the latest.

[…]

New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson, chairman of the rules committee, made the announcement at the winter meetings, saying the change would go into effect for next season if the players’ association approved. Safety and concern over concussions were major factors – fans still cringe at the thought of the season-ending hit Buster Posey absorbed in 2011.

Players, both current and former, generally seem unhappy about the rule change because it fundamentally alters the nature of the game, but Stu had some insight into why MLB would implement the change.

“Well, the NFL just paid $800 million in lawsuits related to concussions,” Stu surmised. “That’s why. That’s what it is.”

But Glenn wasn’t buying it.

“Look. If you are getting into the NFL and you’re getting a concussion and this is somehow or another a surprise to you, you’re a moron. Now, I know there must be a lot of morons in the NFL, but do you really want to stand up and announce to the world how much of a moron you are,” Glenn asked. “It’s like boxers trying to saw. You’re getting hit in the face, of course.”

Ultimately, Glenn, Pat, and Stu wondered whether or not the tightened rules and improved equipment might actually have an adverse effect on safety.

“Rugby doesn’t have this problem. The incidence of damage, severe damage to neck and head in the NFL is much higher than rugby,” Glenn said. “Why? Because the more safety equipment you use, the more invincible you feel and so it’s the reverse effect. In rugby you know: I’m going to get hurt badly.”

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Front page image courtesy of the AP

  • Anonymous

    Home plate collisions don’t occur because people are trying to hurt each other. By rule, if the runner can knock the ball out of the catcher’s mitt, he’s safe. There is a PURPOSE and a STRATEGY to the collision. The manager/coach from little league on up will encourage it, it’s gamesmanship. If you don’t like getting hurt, then don’t play the game, it’s that simple. Anyone who doesn’t like baseball period, you are not qualified to comment on this.

  • kanakattack

    It doesn’t happen in rugby because rugby players are smarter than football players. They’re precise in the way they tackle and the runners know how to handle a tackle so it won’t hurt them. It’s not so much that they don’t hit as hard or run as hard. They are just forced to learn how to do it so it doesn’t hurt them because they have no false sense of security that football players have with wearing pads.

  • Anonymous

    I’m disqualifying Glenn from this discussion. He knows nothing about sports. This is not wussification.

  • Daniel Brenek

    It doesn’t happen in Rugby because they don’t wear pads and helmets, and they’ll hurt themselves just as severely as the opposing player. If you want to stop concussions in football, give them leather helmets and no face masks.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8FvmesaxXg Sam Fisher

    If you join the NFL 9 times out of 10 you are going to get hurt.

  • Anonymous

    We need a law against people who are PANTY WASTE, that would eliminate Liberals

  • AVinny GarSac

    The NFL lawsuits and overall MLB injury cases have little to do with why the MLB has come up with this faulty idea. The real reason is due to the recent increase in pay given out to premiere catchers such as Joe Mauer ($23M/year), Buster Posey ($20M+/year beginning in 2016 -$15M/year presently), Yadier Molina ($15M/year), Brian McCann ($17M/year), and the fact that two of those (Mauer and Posey) wound up missing almost entire season due to injuries inflicted from collisions at the plate… and while both were being presented as the new poster-boys for the sport. McCann missed a heavy amount of this past season due to lingering injuries sustained from collisions in the past. Molina missed significant time due to an injury stemming directly form a collision this year. Young catchers entering their prime such as Matt Wieters, Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Wilin Rosario, Miguel Montero, etc all project to earn similar salaries in upcoming years. MLB teams are trying to find ways to get the most out their spending, and doing so at the Catcher position is limited as it is due to the need to regularly rest those guys else risk serious knee, hip, back, and shoulder deterioration. This rule is designed to help MLB teams to better protect their own investments. I wouldn’t call it ‘wussification’, as most of the players, fans, and coaches oppose the idea of this rule change. I’d call it ‘enhanced profiteering’.

  • batmanroxus

    yup, NASCAR ain’t racing anymore either.

  • Anonymous

    yeah it is, it is the most violent part of Baseball besides a bench clearer, yet more injuries happen at 2nd base when breaking a double play. Figure that out. It has jack to do with safety, it has to do with the image. Just like Hockey and fighting. Wussification!!!!!!!!

  • RJ Vidimos

    So what MLB is saying is that the runner does not have the same right to the plate as the catcher. If the catcher is doing his job correctly, he will have the ball tucked in close to his body. As the collision happens, he is to roll backwards, lessening the blow. This would not stop all injuries but too many major leaguers do not know the basics. They do not know how to bunt, hit the cut off man or run the base paths. So instead of teaching the proper way to absorb a hit, they ban the play? Sorry, you just made the game less interesting.

  • Ol lib

    Baseball is suposed to be a game of athletic finesse. Not brute force as those home plate collisions have made it. The ruling should return the finesse.

  • Anonymous

    Lets make the bats out of cardboard line drives would not hurt.

  • Anonymous

    Bert30, I would say you aren’t qualified to comment either. I have coached 4 year old’s through high school and I can tell you the only league where the collision rule is allowed, is the majors. Do you really think they teach kids to plow over each other. I love baseball and my son plays and has played catcher. It’s simple to me. We shouldn’t ask anyone, who has dedicated as much of his life as it takes to become a major league catcher, to step in front of a Pete Rose or lets say Albert Pujols to save a run. What if we ask a rookie to do that and he receives a carrier ending injury. All so Bert30 can see a collision on Sports Center. Come on Man. Go watch Hockey!! When the baseball forefathers wrote that rule they didn’t envision it like it has become. The rule is outdated and though i normally like Glen he is way off here. This rule needs to be changed so none of these boys, that grow up to be catchers, have to put up with this crappy rule. Its hard enough to recruit young catchers and if they know they may have to be sitting ducks they are smart to try and find another position.

  • Anonymous

    You’re entitled to your opinion man. The catchers wear pads for a reason.

  • drew

    Glenn,
    I respect you, but please do your research before posting something so
    misinformed. I’ve played baseball / softball my whole life and I
    support this movement. This much needed change in MLB is being led by
    very respected managers in the league.

    Lookup the Buster Posey, (SF Giants) Scott Cousins (Marlins) collision incident from
    2011 for a reference of what needs to be eliminated from the game. They
    are simply trying to penalize players who target defenseless catchers
    and basemen instead of the base. These plays can cause very serious
    injury & even possibly ruin a mans career. How do you think you
    would fair if you had to stand still, with your eyes fixed on an
    incoming throw, while letting a 6’2″ 220 lb pro athlete lower his
    shoulder into your chest while running full speed?

  • drew

    Actually it’s not legal to collide at home in little league. The “slide or avoid” rule is always in effect. If there is a play at ANY base, the runner must slide or avoid the defender… otherwise they are OUT for interference. This rule is used at MOST levels of baseball & softball. I play competitive tournament softball with many former college, minor & major league ballplayers, and we have the same rule no matter what association we play under.

  • drew

    Finally, an intelligent voice he spoken on this!

  • ANTHONY CLIFFORD

    I don’t know what little league you played in, but it was encouraged heavily where I grew up. Your goal as the runner in that situation isn’t to hurt the catcher, but to knock the ball out of the catcher’s hands. Interference is when a runner stops a fielder from making a play.

  • drew

    All Little League’s have the same rules Anthony. It’s a national association.

  • Anonymous

    Best move baseball could make.You can’t come in spikes high into second so why should you become a bulldozer at home?If baseball wants to stop something please ,please don’t go to instant replay.Between 8 to 10 foul balls for most at bats and instant replay the game will put everyone to sleep.

  • drew

    To stop 8 oz baseballs. Not 220 pound humans. Nice try.

  • Anonymous

    Hey Glenn, why don’t you consider that those related injuries – especially head injuries are sometimes permanent. As in my uncle’s case after playing years of professional football, he now has neurodegenerative disease with alzheimer’s like symptoms. NFL made a ton of money off these players so guess what they can pay up. You got one thing right in this article – you don’t know what you’re saying.

  • Anonymous

    I never liked what Pete Rose did and started with his home plate mauling. Getting rid of the intentional PR’ing of the catcher puts baseball back the way it’s supposed to be played….You’re supposed to beat the ball to the plate not the guy who caught it after you arrived late.

  • Anonymous

    Drew is 100% correct.
    Get down, give up, or go around.
    The rules should have been at the MLB yrs ago. Why
    risk hurting a 15 mil a yr catcher, the fans will only pay for it,
    one way or another. Plus the current MLB rule only confuses
    the LL boys.

  • http://www.facebook.com/randy.wade.777 Randy Wade

    Nerf Baseballs – Thats the answer, and girlie throws too!

  • ..

    Lets ban wild pitches as well. “T” ball by 2015!

  • Anonymous

    It’s the way all sports are going. Injuries are predominating in all sports today because sports are more entertainment than true sport. In a team sport how is it that one player makes millions while the rest make peanuts? Surely, a top player has extra talents, but if the team fails to support, the superstar is nothing.

  • ..

    I think all players should wear bubble-wrap uniforms so they don’t break a nail during the game.

  • Anonymous

    Well said Drew. In Football they call it Pass Interference and the defender has to at least make a play for the ball, or consider NFL rules on roughing the passer or roughing the kicker within seconds of the pass or kick …. but Pete Rose’s cheap shot version of baseball is different….while the defenseless catcher has to keep his eye on the incoming 90 MPH baseball all the runner has to do is smash into the catcher and break up the play and the player. I never liked Pete Rose for doing what he did and when his defenders called him Charlie Hustle the only hustle that came to mind was his gambling.

  • Anonymous

    Excellent. period.

  • Anonymous

    You’re supposed to beat the ball not the catcher.

  • Anonymous

    In the NFL nobody, a lot of guys, don’t intend to dish out concussions with helmet to helmet hits on defenseless receivers, but it’s having a negative impact on their health so rules were changed and I think this is going to be a positive thing.
    Catchers already have shorter careers than most guys due to wear and tear on their knees. I don’t know if I were supreme ruler of Baseball I would ban home plate collisions, but I get where the rule change is coming from. While catchers have protective equipment it’s not sufficient for the kinds of blind side hits they could take.

  • Anonymous

    Posey is from South Ga, right down the road from me and got to see him in high school for 10 games or so, I would rather
    see him behind the plate calling a good game then sitting on the bench in a cast for 162 ball games.

  • Anonymous

    Glenn clearly has not seen “League of Denial”
    nor is aware of the popularity of MMA…America is being wussified my ass

  • Anonymous

    Last post on this.
    I am on the local LL Association board and if we get word that a coach is telling his boys to go in home like that it will be his last game coaching, he will be barred for the rest of the yr and if he does it again it will be permanent.

  • http://answersfromscripture.blog.com/ Eddie Armstrong

    Maybe it is just my age (62) and the violence I have seen in my life, but this is only a game with not much redeeming value except for entertainment and the discipline plus God-given talents required to reach a high level of skill for the majors. This is what I admire in the sport. Why not protect an often defenseless catcher? Is a possible career-ending injury or death (God forbid) part of the athletic power and finesse of the game? I hope not. Maybe I am a pussy cat myself, but there are other things that make a man that require more than muscles and weight. Let’s PLAY ball!

  • Anonymous

    Vinny, that’s an interesting perspective and possible benefit to the rule change. Point well taken. But the roughing the catcher play was started by a disgraced player. So if destroying the catcher is fair game then how about justifying The Pete Rose Rule to destroy First, Second & Third? How about knocking out the First baseman on a pick off play? Steal Second? No…run him over and take him out! What’s next…throwing bats at the pitchers? The whole point in Baseball is to beat the ball not the players.

  • AVinny GarSac

    You’ve apparently never had to stand your ground at the plate while waiting for an incoming throw and another player barreling down on you at full speed. You also apparently know nothing about the sort of injuries that have come from these collisions in recent years, to both catchers and runners. There are relatively few injuries incurred at second base, not even while breaking up double plays. Why? Neither the second baseman nor short stop are actually blocking the bag. They generally have enough time and experience to get out of the way of virtually any runner sliding or charging at them. This is not the case at home plate, where there is a severe injury involved nearly once a week in the majors.

    As for hockey and fighting, that was more of a move to purify the sport… rather than let it remain a boxing match on ice.

  • Anonymous

    Glenn. your Company should sponsor a LL team, good experience and when you sign up they will give you a copy of the rules, if you encourage your boys to go into home like that you will be banned from coaching the rest of the year, 2nd offense will be permanent. You will love the time spent with the kids 2-3 times a week for 1-2 hrs.

  • Toes

    America is not just in love with sports, we idolize every aspect and detail of them. It’s at every level. I just drove into a small town that welcomed its visitors by listing out on a big sign all of the State Championships it’s teams had won… Maybe we should make abortion into a sporting event in this country. Think about it, what is more dangerous, a player getting run over at home plate by another player, or a truly “defenseless” baby being slaughtered in the womb? Please just think about it before reacting with your Party line. Objectively, and honestly you would have to choose the latter. Now if abortion practice were a sport, according to the standards being set out, they would have to regulate the killing of the baby a penalty, and ban it from the sport since it’s prone to cause harm. Right?

  • AVinny GarSac

    Those pads are not the same sort of gear that hockey and football players wear. Trust me. I know. I’ve played all three sports, and I spent several years behind the plate. The pads are there to protect catchers from errant pitches (which in some cases come at a velocity of 102 MPH from a distance of 60 2/3 feet.) and foul tips. If you’ve never noticed, the home plate umpires wear a similar form of padding, yet they won’t be blocking the plate from anyone.

  • Toes

    I love it. Maybe nookies in the club house and a warm blankie after the game.

  • Toes

    Did Ty Cobb know this?

  • Toes

    You know, in the medical field when our patients have failed Ambien, the next thing we prescribe is 2 full innings of Major League Baseball. Pretty much guaranteed to put you to sleep, with very few ASEs.

  • Toes

    Under the same circumstances as these guys ($200 M contracts) I’d do it every night.

  • AVinny GarSac

    One small problem, there is no “Pete Rose Rule”. The problem with your analogy is that there is a different situation happening at the other bases. The only base that a defender is allowed to block is home. If a defender stands in the way of a runner heading to first, second, or third it is ruled as base-path interference. It was called over two dozens times this past season, and twice in a game against the Chicago Cubs. Even when applying a tag at any of those bases, you are not allowed to stand in the runner’s way.

    Another flaw in your analogy is the fact that Pete Rose wasn’t the guy who invented bowling over a catcher. That began way back in the 1880s. In fact, part of the reason Ty Cobb was so hated by his fellow players was due to such tactics, regardless of need. If a catcher stood anywhere close to the plate, Cobb would intentionally shift his path so that he would run over an unsuspecting catcher. Cobb retired from playing in 1928 and died in 1961. Rose was born 1941, and debuted in 1963.

  • AVinny GarSac

    Again, a small problem with this statement. Perhaps you should watch the game a bit more closely. Nearly every single collision at the plate is caused by a runner beating the ball and trying to make his way through a catcher blocking his path. Keep in mind that if a runner moves around the catcher, he could be called out for running out of the base line. Also, if the catcher happens to get the ball just as the runner is trying to avoid him, there is a 100% chance of the runner being called out for running out of the base line.

    The entire reason for the collision is almost always the fact that the runner has beaten a throw that arrives shortly after he does. The catcher is trying to stall the runner to be able to apply a tag. Rarely does a collision occur without the runner beating, or tying, the ball to the plate.

  • AVinny GarSac

    As has been stated many times before, baseball is only boring to those without an imagination or a strong mental focus. Which case is yours?

  • Kevin

    I played ball from the time I was 9, all the way through senior year of varsity. I learned to catch my first year and quickly became my favorite position. I learned to square up, about three ft up the line, hold tight, cause that runner is going do everything they can to knock that ball out of your hands. And I’m proud to say no-one ever could. But I knew I could get hurt, goes with any sport. Fact is tough, despite a few bumps and bruises, I’ve never been injured playing ball. I believe the contributing factor to be that I learned to play the game correctly. And by learning the proper way to play, you simultaneously learn the safe way to do things. I even remember knocking a kid on his behind on a big play at the plate, when he tried knocking me down. He cried, cuss he’s the type of child these guys are trying to raise. But the coach contested it, and was over ruled. Any league that doesn’t allow for collisions at the plate, is a nerfed, pansified league built for coddled mamas boys that are only playing because their dads were just trying to find a way to get them to stop spending so much time in their rooms touching themselves.

  • Jaamoose

    Wow – Boehner stood up to the teahadis and Beck supporters are pointing out the stupidity of a Beck article…has the world turned upside down?

  • Boagrius

    Au contraire mon frere, I beg to differ. I have seen many many plate collisions in my life time. I was 15 years old when Charlie Hustle hit Ray Fosse like a freight train at home plate. I remember the game vividly. I still believe to this day that Peter hit Ray like he did on purpose for the reason of #1 hurting him and two, instilling a sense of foreboding the next time Rose comes barreling around 3rd headed for the plate.

    Back when I was a kid, most catchers were bigger and stronger than the average player. Pete Rose was an exception. He was a great offensive weapon and defensive player as well but I also believe he was a bit ruthless when running the bases or tagging a player. Ty Cobb, who played for the Detroit Tigers in the beginning of the 20th century, had the same philosophy. He was a dirty player and purposely tried to hurt people. The man would sharpen his spikes for sliding into base to cut up the defending player.

    Today, players are much bigger and stronger and catchers are getting hurt more often. Before we know it, MLB will be having line backer size guys behind the plate to compensate for the evolving of larger stronger players. I can’t see the players association ratifying this new rule. But, given the wussy socialist society we live in now, it’ll probably happen.

  • jon

    interference is also called when the fielder blocks the base path obstructing the runner while not making a play

  • HCUA

    Cobb was into the heads of everyone he played against. He would sharpen his spikes just to psych them out, and it worked. All those guys he played against were quite capable of retaliating, and some of them did. He or anyone else might get a mouth full of horsehide if the infielder wanted to do it to a guy sliding into the bag.

    He was the best player ever, and he has been getting a bad rap for playing good baseball. Everyone could get a file if they wanted one. I like him, Peter Rose, who should be in the Hall of Fame, and Billy Martin. If you can’t take the heat, get out of the kitchen.

  • Toes

    Hey Sac, I’ll be the first to admit it takes a lot of imagination to enjoy watching baseball, and mine just isn’t quite there. Now playing it is totally different. I thoroughly enjoyed playing ball for about 14 years, but then again, that was back when you played hurt, and the pitchers actually pitched inside, and did it for 9 innings or more. The fundamentals were stressed over and over, and an outfielder could actually make a strong throw home either on the fly or one good bounce. Today I would pay he price of admission twice over to see one strong throw per game. All these guys want to do is juice up and crank em over the fence. How exciting. That’s like watching Shaq dunk on every play down the court.
    As far as mental focus, with a nickname like Toes, I can barely focus on the next step I take. Good luck with it though!

  • HCUA

    My Dad played in college for Iowa and Minnesota in the twenties, and he said that some people lost some teeth and there were some broken noses a lot. That was a man’s game then. He said that, one year, only 12 guys won letters. You played both ways. He was the left tackle. I thought that the players then were much lighter than today, but, he was about 6-3 and 220. He said that he was light

  • Anonymous

    When BHO leaves office–sooner than later, I hope–he can become a pitcher in the major leagues. He does throw a ball like a girl. Cheers.

  • Toes

    For all the liberals out there who have been wussified, maybe we should make it “fair” by going to weight classes like boxing and the MMA. Anyone over 200 lbs will be banned. They can start their own damn league so the 190 pounders won’t get hurt by them.

  • Toes

    Now that’s well said.

  • HCUA

    They are supposed to slide. Cobb had 12 different slides. He would practice all winter, until his legs were bleeding, and slide some more. He hunted all winter in Georgia with steel plates in his shoes so that his legs would be much stronger. Then, in the Spring, when he played, he said that it felt like he was not wearing any. He was a lightning-fast runner, too, and would practice sprinting all the time. He had total dedication to his job, and those are some of the reasons that he was the best of all time.

    When he retired, he had about 65 records, many of them still standing, and he quit about 1928.
    He once tried to hit homers on purpose, just to show that he could if he wanted to. In two games in a row, he hit something like 2 homers and 3 triples that hit the top of the fence. Then he went back to his great style.

  • tat

    Next up…everyone has to run like girls because its not fair that some folks are faster tha others. And the discrimination…only letting the people who excel play? This cant possibly fit into a consistent, truly Progressive world.

  • HCUA

    No infielders or outfielders are throwing to the catcher at 90mph. Where do you watch ball?

  • HCUA

    Panty waste is where you might find Oh Bummer, if you looked in the panties.

    Or diapers.

  • Toes

    Again, very well explained. Thank you for clarifying that Pete Rose was not the first player ever to bump a catcher. I think we’re talking with a few here who haven’t followed the game long. Oh, and someone mentioned throwing bats at pitchers. I hope that wasn’t a serious original thought. If so, please look up Bert Campenaris.

  • Toes

    I was no Pete Rose fan growing up, but he was a fierce competitor, and would do anything to win a game. In fact that was his goal every single time he took the field, and in every situation, no matter how dire. To this day he is the winningest athlete ever, in any professional sport, having played on the winning side 1972 times.

  • HCUA

    I will be 80 if I get that far in 2 months. I still play BASEBALL. Today, I showed some finesse, when, with one out and the sacks loaded, a fly was hit to me in short left. I don’t know what the runners were thinking, I guess that they weren’t, but I caught the guy off second, and he was out by about two feet. It ended the inning, but, some of the umps are pretty stupid, and the ump called the guy safe at second. He thought that you had to tag him after a fly ball. We set him straight, and went to the dugout.
    I went one for three, with an RBI. We won, 11-0.
    When I get to be and old man, I might play softball, but, I am not ready for that yet.

  • HCUA

    If I had no chance to beat the play going into second, I would go in standing up and try to get the infielder to throw off-line. It put my head in danger, but, that is how I played. These days, at my age, we are not allowed to slide, or we will be called out. That is OK with me now, as the fields are in terrible shape, and I don’t need a broken ankle.

  • Anonymous

    http://articles.latimes.com/1999/mar/07/news/mn-14924

    If there is a bible of ‘The Wussification of America,’ it must be ‘DUMBTH!,’ the 52nd book written by prolific author Steve Allen, alias ‘Mr. Entertainment.’

  • HCUA

    If I could have gotten my son to play ball, I would have trained him to be a catcher. Catchers and pitchers always have the best chance to go big-time. Some of these garbage pitchers in the Majors, go 6 and 9, with an ERA of 4.32, and haul in 6 million a year. Talk about overpaid, they are the ones.

  • HCUA

    The ball weighs five and a quarter ounces.

  • HCUA

    By the time the pitcher releases the ball, he may be 6 or 7 feet closer to home, and it’s still 102. Only Chapman of Cincinnati throws that hard consistently. Randy Johnson, at 6-9, was plenty close when he let go of that baby.
    This is fun. I love talking baseball, and it beats politics sometimes, although I love politics. too. After all, that’s where all the action is.

  • HCUA

    No redeeming value? Get a life. Baseball, Mom, and apple pie were around a long time before you.

  • HCUA

    Get rid of soccer. That is a totally un-American game. Kids should play American games, not some stupid sport where the field is 200 yards long, and the scores, if someone manages to score, are 0-0, or 1-0, if you are lucky. It’s worse than watching a chess match, or watching grass grow.

  • HCUA

    What is putting people to sleep are the new rules in high school and college basketball this year. Who wants 50 fouls a game? What a drag. Even in the old days, not very long ago, my wife would go to bed and want to know when I would be there. I would be watching b-ball, and I would say–There are only 43 seconds left in the game. I’ll be right there. Around 15 minutes later, after ten timeouts apiece, especially when one team was ahead by 16, I would finally turn off the TV, when the game finally ended.

  • Guest

    OFF TOPIC.

  • HCUA

    Exactly. People that don’t like baseball don’t understand what it is all about, and some of the best athletes of all time played the game. It is a beautiful thing. Who could not like Stan The Man Musial, Albert Pujols, Willie Mays, Ty Cobb, Rogers Hornsby, Babe Ruth or Joltin’ Joe?
    Speed, power, grace. Exciting !!!

  • HCUA

    What is a teahadis? That’s a new word for me, and I always know when I see a new word.

  • HCUA

    Jimmy Carter made peanuts, but then, he was not a good player, anyway.
    Come to think of it, he probably made millions, all right, but, they WERE peanuts.

  • Chris Gobin

    Next the NFL will adopt a NO tackle policy, touch only, maybe use ribbons in waistband… Oh and NHL players will now play their games on X-box to prevent injuries.

  • Anonymous

    If home plate collisions are on purpose instead of by accident then of course they should be banned.

  • Anonymous

    Quite being a wuss and call them what they really are.
    Those pussies need to man up and stop using gloves too.

  • bumpkin

    They are trying to avoid Worker’s Comp and lawsuit claims. Why aren’t we talking about George Soros buying up the Marlin Firearms company through his company Cerberus Capital Management, which owns The Freedom Group? Oh, wait. Guess I need to go back to the headlines list and look again. FYI: If Americans are ‘wussied’ as is inferred, (which will only happen in the youth) it would certainly be advantageous to planners/plotters if the plan was to “control people”.

  • Jake

    in
    a sport where fat guys make millions and do nothing to risk their
    long-term health we are supposed to mourn the loss of head injuries??
    The collision at home plate amounts to nothing more than a crash at a
    NASCAR event….do we consider the individual’s children?
    about an hour ago
    it is pathetic to continue to quote “little league” rules the painful truth is that baseball is not a contact sport and does not test the ability of an individual to absorb physical contact that is why so many games are played, you are hanging on to an archaic concept, cut the season to 80 games, allow all contact and let’s play…ooops thats football, no! hockey, how many games???? 160+++, those fat guys sure hang in there!
    · Like

  • Tommy Owens

    Contact with a catcher in possession of a ball in little league is an automatic out. Contact with any malice in little league if he has the ball or not is an out and ejection and you serve a one game suspension in Little League. If you were doing this in your little league, you would stand to lose your charter.

  • Hal Slusher

    I refuse to watch a wiffleball world series.

  • ugottabkiddingme

    Enough with Rose already. Your envy of his non-steriod induced, natural talent is showing.

  • Anonymous

    This is all about the emasculation of the male species. Testosterone is an enemy to the state.

  • William Soost

    Excellent comment, AVinny! And spot on.

  • William Soost

    Hihoze, Rose should be in the hall of fame. So what if he bet on baseball. He never bet against a team he was working for. Gambling is only immoral or illegal if the revenues from gambling don’t go to government.

  • Terri Angerbauer

    The runner has the right to the baseline and the base. If the defender doesn’t want to get ran into he has to move. This is not the same as the slide rule applied in little league, where the runner must slide if the play is close. Anthony Clifford has it right about interference too.

  • Terri Angerbauer

    There are different leagues in little league, Babe Ruth, Pony, etc., they do not all have the same rules. The rules also change as the kids get older, to be closer to MLB rules.

  • HCUA

    We gamble every time that we vote. Where’s my cut?

  • HCUA

    Unless they are scoring standing up, nearly every player slides all the time. If you have watched thousands of games, in truth, not many catchers get run down.
    The slides are around the catcher, trying to get the foot on the plate.
    Name another guy that Rose ran over. You can’t. Fosse got in Pete’s way, but, Pete was not famous for that one incident. He was a champion ball player, as was Ty Cobb, and their records on the field speak for themselves.

  • Anonymous

    Re: Football and equipment. It’s NOT that safety equipment makes you feel invincible it’s that you can USE your safety equipment (helmet, shoulder pads) as weapons and really hurt someone. Also, players today are so much bigger and faster than in the past that it can be a lethal situation.

  • Anonymous

    the best move I saw a catcher make was when Mark McGuire left second base on a single to right, rounded third and headed home. The Montreal catcher (very smartly) moved up the first base line to receive the throw rather than try and bloc the plate. Probably enabled him to finish the season and gave him a few more years in baseball.

  • Anonymous

    Kinda like every player gets a trophy

  • Gary

    Sorry to hear about your uncle, but at the same time, did he not realize the potential for injuries of all types before he signed a contract? The lure of big money makes people do strange things, but no one forces them to play.

  • Fat Lip

    The best part of this wussy application us big fellows get to wear dresses with know panties just like the not so ladies in this country now .
    Hope everybody is ready for the swinging no bitching either all us fellow’s have are rights to you know ..

  • Thomas Davenport

    They most certainly are. Major league outfielders throw to home in the upper 80s regularly and most can break 90…some generate throws of 100+ crow-hopping from the outfield.

    Do some research before you pop off buddy.

  • HCUA

    Well, BUDDY, I don’t usually make snide remarks when answering people, but, that is your style.
    Here is a fact about bullets and baseballs: The farther they go, the slower they get, just like your mind.

  • Anonymous

    I played ball growing up. MY coach wasn’t big on that rule. We collided and collided dude, and we WON.

  • Eliot Mason

    Pretty sure GB is talking about fully grown men playing in the top league in the world. I think that is in some ways a little different than LL noobtard.

  • HCUA

    Not only that, but, I did do research, the numbers were almost impossible to get. It was said that A-Rod, when fully planted, and 2 or 3 others, could hit 90 mph. MLB outfielders today are generally throwing in the low 70s.

  • HCUA

    On a web site called Answers, it says that A-Rod could hit 90 when fully planted, and Jeter did when young once in a while, but, does in the low 80s now. They also said that most MLB outfielders throw in the low 70s.
    Do some research before you pop off, BUDDY.

  • Anonymous

    The last paragraph annoys the ish out of me.

    American football isn’t more dangerous just because the extra equipment gives you a sense of “invincibility”.

    American football players are faster, stronger, and more specialized.. and football plays are shorter and more explosive than any given play in a rugby match (with very little stoppage). Tackling form in rugby is much different than in football, no doubt, but that certainly isn’t the only factor.

  • Anonymous

    I do agree that their is and has been a “wussification” of America going on but I don’t believe that this is part of it. This is simply a common sense approach to address an increasing problem in baseball. Players are no longer 5’10″ and 175 lbs. The average baseball player is looking more like a linebacker everyday and the bone crushing play at home plate is no longer so innocent. I’d prefer simply banning the head first drilling of the catcher in favor of a feet first slide.

  • Bluetahoe

    Glen is absolutley correct. He doesn’t know anything about sports. BAseball is not boxing or football.It is a skill game, not a violent contact sport. Home plate collisions are unnecessarily hazardous to both the runner and the catcher. I am a big sports fan, myself, but I decry the unnecessary football injuries caused by spearing, later hits on the quarterback and ohter gratuitous forms of bullying. I strongly support outlawing such actions, and believe that such considerations are equally valid in baseball.

    Anyway, Gl;en, there is certainly enough to straighten up in Washington without picking fights in the private sector.You are doing a magnificent service for humanity by educating us alll on the wickedness running rampant in politics. Leave MLB alone.

  • Larry Miller

    The NFL is now seeing more knees torn up because they are hitting lower. It’s called the law of unexpected consequences.