A new crop of commercials is drawing on values of hard work and ingenuity that once made America great. A new ad for the Cadillac ELR is aimed at “workers, not wishers.” Walmart, meanwhile, released what has become a controversial ad featuring Mike Rowe. It contains one powerful message: “Work is a beautiful thing.” On radio this morning, Glenn reacted to the pro-work message.

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The Cadillac ELR is a new electric vehicle from the brand. While Cadillac was part of the infamous government auto bailout, the commercial explains that it is an unmatched work ethic and desire for more that got a man to the moon and made Americans the world’s best consumers.

“I want to point out Cadillac got a… bailout from us. I’m tired of people telling me, preaching to me, ‘We’re the greatest country in the world because we just get it done. By the way, thanks for the billions of dollars of bailout because we just couldn’t get it done,’” Glenn said. “[But] I want you to listen to this [commercial] and tell me that this isn’t what America is starving for.”

Watch the commercial below:

This is a message that President Ronald Reagan eloquently delivered, and it took him all the way to White House. Glenn believes Americans are desperate to hear those ideals once again, but it is unclear who is in a position to deliver them.

“This is what Reagan won on because he believed it. We are repeating the 1970s, and they don’t even see it. Remember, we went from Nixon, who was just riddled with corruption, riddled with progressivism…  He really washed our innocence away… So then we went from Nixon to Ford, who was just an imbecile, into the socialist country of America, the socialist direction of Jimmy Carter,” Glenn said. “Jimmy Carter was telling us, ‘Put a sweater on.’ Americans don’t put a sweater on. Americans go find new energy.  That’s what we do… If you give a man a handout, he loses a piece of himself. He loses self-respect. You have to earn it. This is the winning message.”

“Now, I don’t know who is going to come and deliver that message to America,” he continued. “But if we really want to survive, if we really want to make a difference, we will hear that message. That message is the message that will win in every place, every place. It will win.”

Pat and Stu both pointed out that Cadillac is a higher end car manufacturer, and the base price of the ELR is $75,995. Is this message of hard work and dedication one that is purely aimed at the wealthy?

“Is it notable at all that this is a commercial targeted at Cadillac buyer – somewhat of an upscale buyer,” Stu said. “This message in our past resonates to Chevy buyers, and Ford buyers, and Kia buyers, anybody. This should be the message that resonates with every American.

“I think it does,” Glenn interjected. “I don’t think this is a rich man’s [message]. This is an American message.”

Another commercial that gained a tremendous amount of attention is Mike Rowe’s appearance in a new Walmart ad called “I am a factory.” It coincided with the launch of Walmart’s initiative to purchase $250 billion of American-made products over the next 10 years. Many have since criticized Rowe for partnering with the retail giant because he is supposed to champion the little guy. Not standing by idly, however, Rowe has since released an epic response.

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“Play the Mike Rowe ad for Walmart,” Glenn said. “He’s getting crap because ‘Oh, Walmart. Why are you with Goliath instead of David?’ He said there’s nothing inherently good about being small or inherently bad about being big. And it’s true. It’s absolutely true. Life is what you make of it.”

Check out the 60-second spot below:

“If Walmart is putting $250 billion into getting Americans back to work,” Pat said. “How do you bash them for that? Because they’ so big? It is bizarre to criticize… What small guy is going to spend $250 billion getting Americans back to work?”

On Sunday, Rowe took to Facebook to take on his critics.

“Honestly Kevin, who gives a crap about your feelings toward Walmart?” Rowe asked one man who questioned Rowe’s decision to partner with Walmart, often a major target of those who like to demonize business.

“[D]ozens of American factories are going to reopen all over the country. Millions of dollars will pour straight into local economies, and hundreds of thousands of new manufacturing positions will need to be filled. That’s a massive undertaking packed with enormous challenges, and I want to help,” he added.

“Isn’t this the kind of initiative we can all get behind?” he concluded.

But there was more.

“I’ve looked up to you for the longest time,” said the same man, Kevin. “What happened to your support of the underdogs? Sad times Mike.”

Rowe didn’t hold back:

Be strong, Kevin. I’m flattered that you’ve looked up to me in the past. Hopefully, I’ll redeem myself in the future. But I’ve never supported the “underdog” simply because they’re not the favorite. Size might matter in some pursuits, (I’ve been assured it does,) but in business, there’s nothing inherently good about being small, and nothing inherently bad about being big. My foundation supports skilled labor, American manufacturing, entrepreneurial risk, a solid work ethic, and personal responsibility. We reward these qualities wherever we find them, whether they’re in David or Goliath.

To see Rowe’s full 2,648-word response to those and others, you can go to his Facebook page.