The National Review published a profile Monday morning that examines Glenn’s ever-growing focus and influence on culture. Entitled “The New Glenn Beck,” editor Eliana Johnson headed down to Dallas to see what Glenn is building and why he is building it.

Check out the entire article HERE.

“We are in Beck’s office on the second floor of a sprawling movie studio in Las Colinas, near Dallas, Texas. His company, Mercury Radio Arts, purchased the iconic 72,000-square-foot building last June. Movies and TV shows such as Robocop, JFK, Prison Break, and Walker, Texas Ranger were produced here; it includes three main stages, outdoor shooting locations, and a lot of office space,” Johnson writes. “Beck’s personal office is a fusion of the antique and the modern. It reflects the range of his interests, from history and politics to cinema and technology.”

As Glenn has explained in great depth over the last several months, he believes culture provides the key to the future, and the article largely revolves around that theme.

“Though best known for his flame-throwing political commentary, he is turning his attention to cultural projects like plays and movies,” Johnson explains. “His years in TV, he says, have taught him that news is secondary to culture. ‘News,’ he says, is simply ‘what the culture allows.'”


From 1791 Supply & Co. to TheBlaze TV, American Dream Labs to Mercury Ink, the article makes sense of the various projects Glenn is working on and how they tie into his plans to influence culture.

“Beck is nostalgic for an America of decades past, and his cultural projects will aim to resurrect and revive it,” Johnson writes. “It’s an America where duty trumped desire and Americans were bound together by a sort of civic religion created by that sense of duty. ‘I want to impact the culture in the way that people see good again,’ [Glenn] says.”

Ultimately, TheBlaze’s new mission statement – We tell stories of love and courage where the good guys win – encapsulates Glenn’s mindset as he moves forward.

“Beck is nostalgic for an America of decades past, and his cultural projects will aim to resurrect and revive it,” the article reads. “It’s an America where duty trumped desire and Americans were bound together by a sort of civic religion created by that sense of duty. ‘I want to impact the culture in the way that people see good again,’ [Glenn] says.”

Read the profile in its entirety HERE.