Will Cain exposes NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio’s war on charter schools in new docuseries

On Thursday’s Glenn Beck Program, Dana Loesch filled in for Glenn and was joined by TheBlaze’s Will Cain to discuss progressive New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s war on charter schools. In February, de Blasio brought down the gauntlet on three charter schools operated by Eva Moskowitz, leaving hundreds of kids without classrooms to return to this fall. Will’s kindergarten-aged son attends one of those three schools, and he working on a four-part digital documentary series for TheBlaze entitled “Alise vs. the Mayor,” in which he looks at the issue of charter schools in New York City through the eyes of a student of Harlem Success Academy and her mother.

Watch Episode 1: Pawn below:

Alise’s story is quite powerful, and in parts two, three, and four of the series you will learn more about the families who rely on these charter schools to provide not just a good education but a good environment to learn and thrive.

“You’re not just talking about a good school,” Will said. “You are talking about a lifeline.”

Considering these charter schools are among the highest performing schools in all of New York state, you might wonder why de Blasio – who rode the ‘income inequality’ bandwagon to victory last November – would deny these children the opportunity to succeed. Will, however, offered three possible reasons:

1. He has a known political vendetta against Moscowitz
2. He is deeply in bed with the teachers union
3. In his warped progressive ideology, sub-par equality better than unequal success

Ultimately, Will said viewers may be surprised about what they learn from this docuseries in the coming weeks – chiefly, how large an impact charter schools have on familial culture and the unlikely allies that rally around the movement.

Get Glenn Live! On TheBlaze TV
  • Deckard426

    Another home run for Loesch with this interview.

  • Anonymous

    Isn’t it about lost revenue from the feds for schools & ultimately teachers & their unions? If money is being raised independently – then it can’t be siphoned off by the city, unions, etc. That must just irritate him…

  • Anonymous

    Gotta love it how liberals/leftists like Oblabbio and his ilk like to portray themselves as for the children, for the poor people and downtrodden. Yet, they deny access to a better quality education by cutting off school vouchers so children trapped in miserable, failing, cesspool public schools cannot escape these inferior schools. They are in the pockets of the unions, who vehemently oppose vouchers, at the expense of doing what is right for the children. Liberalism is a mental disorder – Michael Savage is right.

  • Guardian

    It’s all politics. The kids in this charter school scored tops – it makes the rest of the schools look bad which also makes the leadership look bad. Solution? Get rid of the perceived problem that makes them look bad – the charter school. Politics over children.

  • Haley Schmitterbach

    Centralized bureaucratic socialism began to grow more prevalent in the United States after Stuart Chase laid out the eighteen collectivist tendencies of Germany and Italy on pages 95 and 96 of his 1942 book The Road We Are Traveling.

  • ameree

    Hopefully Will Cain will now do a documentary about
    1. The parents of traditional public schools that were forced into half their building to make way for Success Academies and are now treated like second class citizens in their own school
    2. Eva not being transparent and opening the books to her charter operations even though she claims to be a public school and takes public dollars
    3. The special needs students and ELLs denied access to Success Academy along with the behavior problem students and low performing students that Success tossed out and sent back to public schools because they couldn’t handle them and it would reflect in their own scores.

  • ameree

    If she has plenty of independent money, then why does she need tax dollars?

  • ameree

    It’s not hard to be tops when you eliminate problem students and only keep the best. Success is like the Little League coach who picks only the talented players and then claims he’s better than everyone else.

  • Guardian

    It’s done by lottery.

  • ameree

    Which parents have to apply for…then those kids that are problems are “counseled out” and sent back to the public schools. Usually that is done right before testing and right after the date passes which allows them to keep the money for that student.

  • Guardian

    …”counseled out” and sent back to the charters. … You are making no sense.

  • ameree

    My bad. Counseled out and sent back to the public schools.

  • ameree

    And what do you know! Here’s an article today regarding what I was saying. One particular paragraph stands out

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/education/gonzalez-success-charter-students-fail-top-city-schools-article-1.1833960

  • Anonymous

    Choice Media did a fantastic piece on this story on last week’s “Reform School”…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XCYfjVsiyo&list=PLlfByvTYaRoWPpIz66Y1vqYQwn2ShnCpD&index=3

  • Guardian

    You can’t necessarily extend that schools experience to all of the charter schools. Also, where this does happen, what about those who do stay in? How is their performance compared to their history? My bet is that it is better than it was and better than it would have been without it.

  • ameree

    If they are scoring that high on the state tests and the school can’t get at least three kids into one of the specialties, than that says they are only teaching the kids to be test taking robots who aren’t authentically thinking. FWIW, even the middle schools that are considered “failure factories” had kids accepted to one of the eight. This just proves that if you are a good parent, your kid will do well anywhere.

    But the biggest concern in that article isn’t the kids not getting in to specialities, it’s the 56% attrition rate. 32 of an original 73 kids dropped out and likely went back to the public schools. That’s a crime that she gets any credibility if she failed to teach over half the students and it’s a crime she’s even being compared to public schools with those tactics.

  • Guardian

    We must be reading different articles, because I have read about the attrition rates being far lower in some charters to non existent in others compared to public schools.

  • ameree

    73 kids in first grade, 32 left by the time they got to eighth grade. That’s bad and far worse than any public school. Even if it the reason for pushing those kids out were valid, it’s disingenuous for charters to claim they are better given if they get away with that.

  • Guardian

    Hearsay.

  • ameree

    Umm…no. That’s coming from Success’s reports.

  • Guardian

    Apparently they don’t speak for all.