Meet the Obama donors behind the Time Warner Cable/Comcast merger

It has been just two days since Glenn first asked his listeners to visit GetTheBlaze.com and fill out the FCC comments form in regards to the proposed merger of Time Warner Cable and Comcast. Just 10,000 comments would have made a significant impact, but some 22,000 responses have already poured in from concerned Americans who do not believe this merger is in the public interest.

On radio this morning, Glenn thanked the audience for their overwhelming response over the last several days and encouraged people to tell their friends and family to make their voices heard as well. Glenn, Pat, and Stu also offered some startling insight into why Comcast executives are marching through the Congressional testimony and FCC comments period seemingly without fear.

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“Yesterday, we told you that Comcast has the largest lobbying team in the history of America. That’s pretty significant,” Glenn said. “They’re trying to get this merger approved. They’re trying to jam it down everybody’s throat. And they’re not afraid.”

Why?

As Glenn explained, when you look at the political donations of Time Warner Cable and Comcast, there is an obvious political bias within the companies. According to Forbes, Comcast employees donated $465K to the Democrat National Committee vs. $114K to the Republican National Committee in 2012. Time Warner donations were $442K to Obama and $28K to Romney.

But those fundraising figures are just the beginning. The Forbes article goes on to explain two Comcast executives playing a major role in the merger talks have deep ties to the Obama Administration.

1. Comcast CEO Brian Roberts is a big Democratic donor and one of the President’s golfing buddies. He serves on Obama’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness. In 2011, Roberts hosted Obama and his senior advisor Valerie Jarrett at his home in Martha’s Vineyard.

2. Meanwhile, Comcast executive vice president David Cohen is overseeing the merger. As Forbes reports, Cohen and his wife have given some $500,000 to Obama while raising another $2.2 million. Cohen has hosted fundraisers for the President at his Philadelphia home.

The purpose of this FCC comments period – which ends August 25 – is to help determine whether or not the merger is in the “public interest.” Considering this merger would allow two of the biggest cable monopolies – with the worst customer service records – to dictate what 30% of America can see on cable TV, it is safe to say the public interest is not the priority. Ultimately, this merger means less choice, less competition, and higher cable bills.

“You ask the FCC: Is this in our interest or in the interest of some political cronies,” Glenn said. “This is clearly not in the public interest. Send that message clearly to the FCC.”

Fill out the FCC comments form HERE.