Karl Marx defined socialism as a pit stop between capitalism and communism. While sometimes this change happens slowly, it always ends badly. The quickest and worst example of this transition is Chairman Mao, the greatest mass murder of the 20th century. Mao Zedong used his power to crush the Chinese people in a merciless attempt to create a new socialist China. The majority of his crimes came in two distinct waves — The Great Leap Forward, beginning in 1958, and the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s. In the end, an estimated 65 million Chinese had died by execution, imprisonment or forced famine.

Listen to this segment from The Glenn Beck Program:


GLENN: The story of America is really one of self-reliance and optimism. And profound faith. Not only in the context of religious freedom, but also in the unprecedented faith in the able to of human beings to control their own destiny. And while the spirit of personal responsibility was extraordinary, strong with our Founders, great patriots like Thomas Paine argued for redistribution of wealth right off the bat. Alexander Hamilton wanted a central bank. They wound up losing those battles, but there were plenty who kept on fighting.

The Constitution of the United States kept those dogs at bay for a better part of 200 years. But eventually, those seeking a different path than the ones the founders settled on, realized only way to really defeat the Constitution was for the people to stop reading it. Progressives realized victory required changing history. And to defeat them, we have to correct that.
Progressives know how powerful history is. When these truths are told and the lies get corrected, the game is going to be on. It’s pulling the mask off, like Che Guevara. Che may make communism look cool and trendy, but the reality couldn’t be more horrific and disgusting. These related political philosophies are not hip and are certainly not taken lightly. Karl Marx defined socialism as a pit stop between capitalism and communism. It isn’t an end point. While sometimes this change happens slowly, it always ends badly. And perhaps never worse than with Chairman Mao. Mao used his power to crush the Chinese people. The majority his crimes came in two distinct waves.

Lee Edwards explained.

VOICE: From 1959 to 1961 was the so-called Great Leap Forward, which was actually a gigantic leap backwards in which he tried to collectivize and communize agriculture, and they came to him after the first year and said, Chairman, 5 million people have died of famine.
And he said, no matter. Keep going.
The second year they said 10 million Chinese have died.
And he said, no matter, continue.
The third year, 20 million Chinese have died and he said, finally, well, perhaps this is not the best idea that I’ve ever had.

VOICE: A survivor of the Mao regime recalls.

VOICE: When he was told his people were dying of starvation, Mao said educate the peasant to eat less. Death haze benefits. It fertilizes the land.

GLENN: Mao’s approach turned from brutal indifference to revenge. With a cultural revolution, his messing was to destroy both enemies and intellectuals.

VOICE: Professors, teachers added in the corner with a dunce cap. They were made to get down on all fours and bark like a dog.

GLENN: Jung Chang and her family found themselves in Mao’s crosshairs.

VOICE: My father was one of the few who stood up to Mao and protested the cultural revolution. My mother was under tremendous pressure to denounce my father. She refused. And so as a result, my mother was made to kneel on broken glass. She was paraded in the streets where children spat and threw stones at her. She was excited to a camp.

GLENN: When her father wrote to protest the cultural revolution, he paid the ultimate price.

VOICE: My mother tried to stop him. My mother said, you don’t want to ruin the lives of your children. So he said, what about the children of the victims. As a result, he was imprisoned, touted, driven insane. He was exiled to a camp and died prematurely tragically.

GLENN: Has a victim of Mao’s rushing rule. Jung Chang’s father was not alone.

VOICE: Some 65 million Chinese died under Maoist communism.

VOICE: Mao just didn’t care. And he said for all his project to take off, half of China may well have to die.

VOICE: By a ratio of three or four to 1, we certainly can say that Mao was the greatest mass murderer of the 20th century.

GLENN: Which makes this comment by former House White House communications director, Anita Dunn, so incredibly disturbing.

VOICE: Two of my favorite philosophers, Mao Zedong and Mother Teresa.

GLENN: Dunn’s comments, once again, highlight the treatment that leftist totalitarianism receives by too many in our society. Communism is looked at as something we can borrow from, liberally, even today. But the truth is that it is among history’s the most proficient killers.

VOICE: According to the Black Book of Communism published by Harvard University Press, nearly 100 million people died under communism in the 20th century. It all flows out of this idea that the communists think that they can create a new society. And anybody who gets in their way, they will cut down. They will kill. They will imprison. And they will eliminate in pursuit of that goal.

GLENN: This was an idea shared by more people than you would think. Including Nobel prize winner and famous playwright, George Bernard Shaw.
VOICE: Now we’ll be kind of enough to justify your existence if you’re not producing as much as you consume — (indiscernible) more, then clearly we cannot use the big organization of our society for the purpose of keeping you alive, your life does not benefit us, and it can’t be of very much use to yourself.

GLENN: And this was actually somewhat subtle for Shaw. He’d also foreshadowed some of the worst atrocities in our planet’s history he wrote, I appeal to the chemists to discover a humane gas that will kill instantly and painlessly. In short, a gentlemanly gas, deadly by all means. But humane, not cruel.

VOICE: Jonah Goldberg, author of the liberal fascism, explains.

VOICE: People like George Bernard Shaw were convinced that overpopulation was this terrible, terrible problem particularly because the unfit, the genetically less desired, were watching the good genetic types. In the late 19th century, there are almost the cream of British intelligencia, embracing eugenics, well into the early 20th century, saying that thousands, millions had to be march off into gas chambers and liquidated.
George Bernard Shaw has this great line where he says, you know, we should do it while playing lovely classical music as we march them into the gas chambers. A lot of people seem to think that this concept of the gas chamber as a tool of social policy was invented by the Nazis. It wasn’t. And I mean in this the most gusting, evil way. It was perfected by the Nazis. But the idea of using things like gas chambers to kill off millions of people so that the rest of the good guys could prosper and move to the sunny uplands of history was immensely popular.

GLENN: With 100 million killed, communism exists in a very exclusive club. Alongside the planet’s worst communicable diseases like smallpox and the bubonic plague. But it’s not just communism. It’s the truth of any government with too much power. Some government is of course necessary. But too much is suicidal. Every all-powerful government has elements of what Marx called the revolutionary holocaust.

The relentless pursuit of nirvana. And the price it’s worth paying to get there in human life.
It’s only by understanding history that we can stop this from happening again and again and again.