The war on women is a term disregarded by many on the right today and is used as a political weapon by many on the left. Join Glenn as he highlights the history of this movement and puts things into proper perspective.

Listen to the full series from The Glenn Beck Program:

Part I
There was a Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Civil War, World War I and World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and Desert Storm. But what’s the longest-running war in world history? If you believe the mainstream media and the progressive left, it’s the War on Women — and it’s being waged exclusively by people on the right. Learn the truth about the beginning of the women’s movement and key issues troubling feminist today — reproductive rights and equal pay.

Part II
There is a War on Women, but it’s not in the United States. According modern American feminists, their biggest priorities include access to birth control, abortion on demand and income equality — all of which they already have. They ignore the plight of women and girls across the globe who face real subjugation and inequality. Under Sharia law, women face a level of oppression and violence the likes of which modern feminists have never experienced. Women live under the rule of men and antiquated laws that include stoning, honor killing and mutilation. These women don’t have the freedom to wear pink, knitted hats and rant in the streets about imagined oppression. Theirs is real oppression that often times ends in slavery, severe punishments or death.


Part III
I Am Woman, Hear Me Roar,” was one of the biggest hit songs in the 1970s from singer Helen Reddy. In the midst of a social upheaval that revolted against traditional female roles, it became the background anthem for protests against beauty pageants, bra burning demonstrations and the failed Equal Rights Amendment.

Part IV
As with many movements in the 1960s and ’70s, Marxism and radicalism poisoned the direction that this movement would take. What may have started out as a way for women to discover new talents that they never knew they had, and to spread their wings to fly a little, morphed into yet another way for radicals to infiltrate American society.

 

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