Ready for a spark of hope? Glenn spoke with Carolyn on radio today, an 18-year-old millennial who called from Pennsylvania to talk about her upbringing, interests and plans for the future. Aside from her impressive and exemplary manners, Carolyn calmly and confidently articulated her ideas with thoughtfulness and intelligence.

Speaking about her father, Carolyn had this to say:

“He really is my role model because he always lived a life, he always does live a life of integrity. You know, it’s . . . sort of like in Ayn Rand’s book Fountainhead, you know, he’ll take whatever job necessary as long as he keeps his integrity,” she said.

Carolyn also revealed that she began listening to Glenn in the fourth grade.


“She’s killing me,” Glenn replied.

Having just graduated from high school, Carolyn will attend Hillsdale College in the fall to study politics and history.

Listen to this segment from The Glenn Beck Program:

This is a rush transcript and may contain errors.

GLENN: America, I want to introduce you to Carolyn, as we meet for the very first time, calling from Pennsylvania.

Hello, Carolyn.

CALLER: Hi, Mr. Beck.

GLENN: How are you? You can call me Glenn. You’re 19 years old?

CALLER: I’m actually 18, sir. I just graduated.

GLENN: Wow, 18. You are so polite. You were homeschooled?

CALLER: Actually no. No, sir. I went to Catholic school.

GLENN: Okay. You were — you grew up in a military family?

CALLER: No, sir. I grew up —

GLENN: Okay. Wait. Wait. You grew — I’m just guessing — you grew up in the South?

CALLER: No, sir. Western PA.

STU: You’re doing a good job of cold reading here.

GLENN: I’ve gone through everything that usually is tied directly to, yes, sir, no, sir. Where did you pick that up? It’s refreshing and wonderful.

CALLER: I mean, I grew up with a father who was a small business owner, who taught his sons and daughters from a small age to go in for a strong handshake, look someone in the eye, and say, yes, sir, no, sir.

GLENN: I love your dad.
(chuckling)

CALLER: He’s been a very big fan of your show.

GLENN: What does he do? What’s his business?

CALLER: Well, for most of my life, my father owned furniture store companies. Though he would sell furniture to people in the local area. But after the crash in ’08, you know, things got rough. And he tried and tried again to start something up. But he bit his tongue and just took a kind of different path in life.

GLENN: And what happened? He’s selling drugs now?

CALLER: No. He — he works for the state. He works for — well, we call it PennDOT. He works for the state as a foreman.

GLENN: Oh, my gosh. That must be killing him. That must be killing him.

CALLER: Yes, sir. He’s part of a union. And I now kind of see it as a blessing because I now understand, you know, not just the side of the entrepreneur, but the side of the union man. And it’s very humbling.

GLENN: Carolyn, I want you to close your eyes right now and put your hand on the radio, and we’re going to heal your father from his deep scars. My gosh, I can’t imagine what it would be like to join a union after a lifetime of working for yourself. To join a union and then — and then PennDOT. I used to live in Pennsylvania, so I know.

CALLER: Yeah. Yeah. He really is my role model because he — he always lived a life — he always does live a life of integrity. You know, it’s not — sort of like in Ayn Rand’s book, Fountainhead, you know, he’ll take whatever job necessary as long as he keeps his integrity.

GLENN: Wow, I could talk to you all day. You make me feel good.

So, Carolyn, how can we help you?

CALLER: You posed a question yesterday of how your life has changed since 2006. But I can kind of trace it back a little bit further. I first started talking about politics when I was in kindergarten. I came home — I came home crying on the bus in kindergarten because in 2004, no one wanted to discuss the Bush versus Gore reelection with me, and I was very, very much so at politics even at that young age. And I actually started watching your show in about fourth grade.

In fourth grade, I had received —

GLENN: She’s killing me.

CALLER: Yeah. I had received a B in I think it was my reading class, and so I wasn’t allowed to watch TV for the rest of the school year. So every night, my dad would let me sneak in and watch Bill O’Reilly’s show, which really got me started. And after that, I would come home after school every day and sit and watch your show at 5 o’clock exactly.

GLENN: Wow. Thank you so much. So that has — that has damaged you and oppressed you.

CALLER: No. No, sir.

GLENN: Or?

CALLER: It’s definitely taught me the importance of principles. You know, I know today in the political climate we live in, especially as a young student, it’s hard to — to be able to see right versus left because it seems as though politics infiltrates not just culture, but the classroom. And what I’ve learned over time is that, yes, people who are liberals can be friends with conservatives.

The key is that you stand on principles. And not rhetoric. I know after the very — very scary shooting last week of — at Capitol Hill, I texted a lot of my — my more liberal friends, you know, who supported Bernie Sanders, voted for Clinton. And I just said, “Hey, I’m someone who stands on the principle of individuality. And I know that just because one Bernie Sanders supporter did such a terrible act, that does not make all Bernie Sanders supporters terrible people.” And I just wanted to remind them that. And that I loved them.

GLENN: And what was their response?

CALLER: A lot of them were just so grateful that I gave — that I showed love. And they said, Carolyn, you’ve taught me that not all Trump supporters are KKK members. Or not all Trump supporters are Nazis. Because if you don’t show love and reach out during those moments, it would be easy to let the status quo persist. And I just wanted to be able to show, you know, just little acts of live. And it does change people’s minds rather quickly when you do that.

GLENN: You know, it’s funny, I was having dinner last night with some Silicon Valley and some Hollywood lefties. And as we were — we were talking, a couple of them sounded very much like people that — one person in particular that I spoke to yesterday to, on the radio, a woman called, and she was very animated. And felt that —

CALLER: Sir.

GLENN: I was, you know, betraying the cause by — by saying that we have to be — we have to change our language and we have to be very aware of how we’re talking. Because we can make an impact for the good as opposed to just building up more walls.

And — and most of the people that were at dinner with me last night, they felt the same way. And they were looking for a way to start talking to people. And not necessarily about politics. Just talking to people. And one of the guys said something along the lines of, you know, we need to fix things politically. We need the government to — to fix all of these things. And, you know, the language is not going to break through.

And I have found — I mean, I — I am sitting with you guys. Because I changed my language. And I haven’t changed a thing in my policy and my principles. But we’re talking. So how can you not say that it doesn’t work? It does.

CALLER: I — I — I whole-heartedly agree with you, sir. I think it’s very interesting that you’re discussing, you know, the idea of care versus harm, liberty and oppression. Because last summer I was actually sitting in a lecture where we were discussing, you know, political campaigning and the such. And the speaker put up on the screen this chart about how liberals use certain words and they react to certain words versus conservatives. And it was the same kind of idea of liberty, care, harm, justice.

GLENN: Yes.

CALLER: And I just sat there, and I thought, you know, that’s it. That’s the secret.

And so ever since then, I’ve been able to engage some of my liberal friends on things such as Planned Parenthood and being pro-life and really some hot button topics. But if you go in and speak the language and you go in with genuine love and intellectual curiosity, which most of my liberal friends are curious, they want to know what a conservative believes. Why we believe what we believe. They don’t just want to label everyone. They do want to know. And if you go in from that approach, they are much more open and much more understanding. They may not change their minds, but they want to understand, the same way we should want to understand.

GLENN: Oh, my gosh. And it’s really amazing — and I have example after example after example of this — people don’t know how to be able to have that dialogue. But they want that dialogue. And if you will model it, they will fall into it.

And it’s — you know, the — one of the — one of the guys that was there last night said, you know, I read a book. And he said, “It totally changed my mind. Totally changed my mind.”

CALLER: Yeah.

GLENN: And he said, “It is the Righteous Mind by Jonathan Haidt.”

CALLER: Hmm.

GLENN: Which is the book that really takes the care and harm and liberty and oppression and is teaching me — has totally changed the way I view things. And you can. I spoke at a table with 20 Silicon Valley liberals last night. One Libertarian.

And we spoke about abortion. And I talked about how they see oppression of women, and they all shook their heads. And I said, “We see sanctity.” And I could feel their eyes roll up. And I said, and that’s a word that you guys don’t speak. So let’s just talk about harm to women. And we had this conversation.

And it was — I don’t know if anybody changed their mind or anything, but at least it didn’t devolve into where it usually devolves.

I mean, one of the guys who was with me, he sat back from the table, and he said — I said, “What did you notice about things?” And he said, “I was watching people and listening.” And he said, “As you were speaking, I heard so many people say, huh. Wow.”

JEFFY: Yeah.

GLENN: And that’s the beginning of it. Just opening people’s minds to, that’s not what I thought at all.

CALLER: Yeah. Exactly. And I think as soon as — as soon as that spark kind of goes off in someone’s mind and the wheels start to turn — it’s not that you should go in with the approach of you want to change their mind, but you just want to understand and they want to understand, that’s when real change happens.

GLENN: Yeah. The problems that I have with talking people is when they say, “How do you win?” Or they’re trying to win the argument.

There’s no — Martin Luther King said — and he is absolutely right. Winning assumes that there’s going to be a loser. And you want everyone walking from the table feeling that they’ve — that they’ve won, that they’ve reconciled with somebody else.

CALLER: Exactly.

GLENN: Because we’re going to have to — if you play this out in your head — if the Democrats get absolutely everything that they want, and let’s say they rule for the next 20 years and they get this socialist utopia. Well, there are going to be people like me and maybe you that — no. Never. I’m not going there. I won’t buy into it. I’m not going to speak that language. I’m not — I will not go over the cliff with the rest of humanity because it’s easier. I will stand for what I believe is the truth.

So what do they do with that ten to 30 percent of that population that doesn’t comply? Well, usually, it’s round them up and kill them or put them in a training camp or whatever.

That’s what happens. And the same would happen if you are a big government person on the right. What are you going to do with the people that disagree with you that will never change their mind? You have to reconcile with them and live in peace. And that has to be done before we talk about any policies. We have to start trusting each other.

Carolyn, quickly, what do you want to do for a living?

CALLER: I’ve not thought that far. I will be attending Hillsdale College in the fall, where I’ll be studying politics and history.

GLENN: Good choice.

CALLER: And I know I — I joke with my mother, I was adopted from South Korea — so I can’t run for president. But I love to joke with my parents that I would like to find a way to be First Lady.

GLENN: Oh, that’s great.

CALLER: The same way Jackie Kennedy went in and sort of restored the White House with interior design. I would say I would like to restore it with making it the people’s house again. Allowing — allowing people from all over the country to come in and, you know, have lunch with the president or the First Lady and just spend hours talking and really knowing what they want to hear.

GLENN: Carolyn, I would love to spend more time with you. I would like to have our producers grab your phone number. I would like to have you on at least once a year to see that you have held the course all the way through school. And if you’re ever looking for an internship, I would love to have you intern directly with me. So I want to put you on hold. We’ll get the phone numbers. Thank you so much. And say hello to your father and your mother.

CALLER: Thank you, sir.