What’s happening?

An “inclusionary” trend in some European schools seems to be spreading in the U.S. “Should schools ban kids from having best friends?” a piece published by U.S. News & World Report asked earlier this week.

“A focus on having best friends certainly indicates there’s an unspoken ranking system; and where there is a ranking system, there are problems,” psychologist Barbara Greenberg wrote in the article.

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The argument is that kids are learning to exclude each other by having a “best friend” and that they should instead be encouraged to have a larger social circle and be “more inclusive and less judgmental.”

Glenn’s take:

“This is crazy town,” Glenn said on today’s show. “Does inclusiveness just keep going until our kids in a classroom are chained together all day? That way no one is ever left out.”

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article provided courtesy of TheBlaze.

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This is a rush transcript and may contain errors.

GLENN: Having a best friend is not inclusive. And that’s a huge problem.

An emerging trend in some American schools is banning kids from having “best friends.” Because it’s not inclusive enough.

Here’s a question – do we ever reach a point where we’re too inclusive? Just asking for a friend. Because I still believe in those.

Does inclusiveness just keep going until kids in a classroom are chained together all day, that way no one will ever feel left out? Everyone goes everywhere together. Lunchtime chained together. Recess, the same. Playing red rover or going to the restroom will be tricky, but hey, at least it will be inclusive.

Dr. Barbara Greenberg, a child psychologist writes, “There is, in my opinion, merit to the movement to ban having best friends.” She says, “The phrase best friend is inherently exclusionary.” She says it implies a ranking system, which creates conflict.

She goes on to explain that kids throw the “best friend” label around so irresponsibly that many end up with their feelings hurt, when they lose “best friend” status to someone else.

In some sane cultures throughout history, that’s called part of growing up.

This trend is bizarre on so many levels. But one of the main problems with the Left’s attempt to change language in order to change reality is that it never changes anything. Did the Left not learn anything from Jurassic Park? “Life finds a way.” Kids will always find a way to have best friends. And yes, some will get their feelings hurt. And yes, they will still somehow survive.

Patrick Moore was one of the founders of Green Peace. He helped grow the organization for several years until he started to realize that, “Science and logic no longer held sway.” The final straw for Moore came when his fellow directors decided Green Peace had to try to ban the element Chlorine, which they started calling “the devil’s element”. Moore asked if they realize Chlorine is actually one of the elements of the periodic table, and that adding chlorine to drinking water was one of the greatest advances in the history of public health. Yes, and they had to ban it. He left Green Peace and never looked back.

Having best friends is on the periodic table of life. It’s not something you could ban, no matter how hard you try.