Maryland bans birthday invites in order to protect feelings

It's natural for a parent to want to protect their kids, but has it gotten to a point that we aren't letting them learn life lessons? A Maryland school has banned invitations to birthday parties, claiming that in the wake of the Sandy Hook shootings they don't want to do anything that would cause kids to get upset. Isn't that crossing a line?

"You notice, you see up in Maryland there's this school now that says you can't have birthday cards, you can't have birthday invitations, you can't pass any of that out at school, you can't have the cupcakes, you can't have anything. And all of it is set up because people will get hurt. You're going to hurt my kids because they weren't invited to the birthday party and so they will be hurt," Glenn said.

"Let me tell you something. My daughter I believe changed. I can tell you the day my daughter Mary changed, and I think she was in first grade. And I'll never forget. She came home and she had a friend who, you know, I think we all you ‑‑ you know, as parents all of our kids at some point have a kid that, no, they're not your friend. They are really not your friend. They are just, you know, they're ‑‑ they'll play with you when nobody else is around, you know, and they are just, they are just not ‑‑ they are just not your friend. Well, Mary had this friend and I remember, you know, Mary coming home one day and everybody in the class was invited to a birthday party except for her. She was the only one in the class. And this was her friend. And my daughter changed because she came home and she had convinced herself that it was okay. And then she had ‑‑ when she told her mother and I, she said it this way: 'You know, it's her birthday on Saturday and I've got to get her something and is she having a birthday party?' Yeah, everybody got a birthday party. Did you get an invitation? No, but that's okay. That's okay. That's okay. Just, I want to get her something and it's okay. It's okay. And she kept saying that, 'It's okay. It's okay.'It broke my heart."

"Now, here comes the hard decision. What do I do? Do I call the school and tell them stop all of the invitations? Do I tell them ‑‑ do I call their parents? Do I involve? Do I ‑‑ as a dad, and I contend this is the easy thing, and I contend we do these things not for our children but for ourselves. We could get involved and we could say, 'You know, I want that changed. That shouldn't happen anymore because that was too much pain.' Too much pain? I think my daughter changed on that day, and I know my heart broke, my heart still breaks, still breaks. I've spent my whole life now with Mary trying to get her to say, 'It's not okay. It's not okay. I hurt. It's not okay.' But she's just put up this wall of defense. And I'm happy to say she is, she is growing past it now. She's a ‑‑ she's a miracle. She is ‑‑ she's a miracle."

"But anyway, what parents do is they get involved and they try to save it, and I contend they do it because it would have been so easy for me to be a hero in my daughter's eyes if I would have said, 'You know what, honey? I'm going to call them.' And she would have said, no, Dad, don't do that. 'No, I'm going to call them and this is going to stop.' And then I could have paraded around my house and I could have been indignant about it and I could have shown her that 'I'm going to do something about it because now I'm her protector.' And if I had enough and early enough, she will believe that I'm her protector when indeed I'm not protecting her; I'm hurting her. And beyond that, beyond that, it's selfish because if I can do that, I can be her hero and be, I don't have to go into my room and cry and try to be strong around my daughter and then come back out of the room and say, 'Honey, you're going to get hurt a lot. That's the way life is. And I wish I could help you, but I can't. And the world sometimes is an unfriendly place, and sometimes, sometimes people hurt you and they don't even know. Sometimes people will hurt and they do know. And I know you feel bad because of this and you feel singled out and you now feel different, and I know you're not going to listen to me at this point. It's not going to make sense, but know this: Everybody who's ever done anything worthwhile has been different, and you can either let it destroy you or you can say, 'You know, it's not okay. I have my feelings hurt, but I can move past that because this will make me a stronger person in the end.' That's a hard conversation to have and a conversation that your kids probably won't understand for a long time, and you're not their hero. 'Dad, help me.' 'I can't. I can't. There's some things you're just going to have to face and I can't help ya."

"All of these things, all of these things come from, do you want to protect her in a small ‑‑ a big government that will protect you, do you want a big helicopter parent that will protect you all the way? I don't care what your politics are, liberal or conservative. It only matters when you start telling me we have to protect."

"I want to play this gun testimony from a citizen in Connecticut in a few minutes. The point of what he said was you were promised liberty, not safety. Liberty. You were not promised anything, except you could be born, and you have certain rights. Everything else is up to you. Teaching that in this society is tough and that's what has to be teached because ‑‑ taught because that is what makes us unique and different. Everybody over in Europe, you can't change your station in life, you can't get around the machine, you can't dream and become."

"Here, you always have been. You've always been able to do it. And now more than ever before for all races, all groups of people, all different philosophies, that's what needs to be taught, reinforced, and strengthened and that doesn't ‑‑ you can't strengthen that through the State. You strengthen that in your own families, with your own children."

There's been a lot of talk about the idea of a (peaceful) "national divorce" as the Left continues to abandon everything that made America what it is. Well, this week's guest on "The Glenn Beck Podcast" is all for that divorce. Michael Malice is the author of "The Anarchist Handbook" and host of the podcast "Your Welcome." He joined Glenn to talk about how an anarchist would peacefully take on America's greatest challenges — with a smile.

"My rights are not up for discussion," Malice told Glenn. He explained why his version of America will save America, and why, in spite of anxious talk of "national divorce," he has so much hope for the future.

Watch the video clip below or find the full episode of "The Glenn Beck Podcast" here:


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There are new curriculum standards being implemented into schools throughout the nation for health classes that not only go far beyond what's appropriate for young children, but are entrenched in clear political biases, too. Under the standards, third-graders are taught about hormone blockers and endless gender identities, and topics get shockingly graphic for kids as young as 11. Some schools are even teaching their teachers and kids to ignore what parents have to say about these topics. And the worst part may be that many parents are completely unaware what their children are being taught.

Tina Descovich, co-founder of Moms for Liberty, joined "The Glenn Beck Program" to explain exactly what you can ask at your next school board meeting to ensure this "horrifying" curriculum isn't being taught in your kid's school.

Watch the video clip below:

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It should come as no surprise that a newsworthy story receives more media coverage when released on a Monday than a Friday. The reason is in part due to a large number of news-consuming Americans checking out for the week to focus on their weekend plans rather than the news.

On Monday's radio program, Glenn Beck shared information that President Joe Biden decided to release on Friday — when fewer people would notice — regarding the Climate Finance report. This report is marketed to Americans as "A Roadmap To Build a Climate-Resilient Economy." But Glenn believes the report to be Biden's Great Reset warning shot to banks.

In this clip, Glenn warned that if Americans don't stand together, in eight years we all indeed will own nothing. Watch the clip for the full story. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.



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On today's radio program, Glenn Beck was joined by Bill O'Reilly to discuss the top stories of the week.

For O'Reilly, the biggest story this week centered around someone mysteriously missing from mainstream media news reports today: Mark Zuckerberg. Specifically, O'Reilly said it's the 'scandalous' way the Facebook CEO spent nearly $420 million to influence the 2020 election — and did so successfully.

Watch the clip to hear the full conversation. Can't watch? Download the podcast here.

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