African American pastor: Paula Deen scandal shows out of control political correctness

Pastor Ken Hutcherson has been featured on The Glenn Beck Program several times, most recently appearing with Glenn at his speech in D.C.. Today, he joined the radio show to discuss the Paula Deen scandal. No stranger to confronting racism, Hutcherson argued that the Paula Deen scandal exposes out of control political correctness and the need to silence any offensive voice.

"Her using the N‑word is terrible," Hutcherson said. "I fight for her right to have freedom of speech in our Constitution. I don't like it, I've been called the N‑word so many times."

Hutcherson explained that he confronted with horrific racism when he was growing up and was often looked at as subhuman.He described his childhood to Glenn, "Probably the best way I can say it is when you are looked upon as less than human, when you are looked on as basically for years, you know, the whole concept in the South is three‑quarters of an individual, you wasn't even a whole individual, when you were looked at as being indolent, when you were looked at as not being able to think, you was a physical specimen, not a literal specimen."

Despite his backgound and exposure to racism, Hutcherson still believes in the Constitution and freedom of speech, even when it is hateful speech.

"The issue is not Paula Deen using the N‑word back in the circumstance she used it, back in the past and have to apologize for it. It is that she was brought out disturbing political correctness," he said.

Hutcherson called out the ridiculous double standard that exists over hateful speech, pointing out that David Letterman can call Sarah Palin a twit and keep his job Bill Maher can call her the C-word.

"What if Bill Maher or Letterman would have called Hillary Clinton those words? Do you think they would have been fired then?" he said.

Hutcherson said it's going to take a lot more than silencing someone in the nae of political correctness to change the country and end problems like racism.

"I think the best way to fight it is to understand that we've got to learn to get along together and get unified in this country. And we better learn that the freedoms that the Constitution has given us is the greatest freedom, the greatest piece of paper ever written anywhere in all the world, in all mankind. And that Constitution gives us the right to disagree, yet move forward together."

Full Transcript Below:

Now, it's strange that this would come up because Pat and I were on an airplane for two days with Ken Hutcherson who is ‑‑ was a former football player, played for the Cowboys, has an amazing story and is a black man who grew up in Alabama during the civil rights era. The stories that he told us I was going to say turned my hair white, but my hair's been white for a while. And wanted to get his opinion on this because I'll bet you that it is a little more passionate than mine. I have no idea where he's going.

Let's go to Pastor Ken Hutcherson in Seattle from the Antioch Bible Church. Pastor, how are you, sir?

HUTCHERSON: I'm doing good, guys. How are you guys doing this morning?

GLENN: Very good. Are you familiar with the story on Paula Deen?

HUTCHERSON: Oh, please.

GLENN: Okay.

HUTCHERSON: You know I am.

STU: (Laughing.)

GLENN: So where ‑‑ so what should happen in this story?

HUTCHERSON: I think it's one of the ‑‑ this is so stupid. I cannot believe something that she said after a guy tried to rob her. If a black guy tried to call me, I may even call him the N‑word.

PAT: (Laughing.)

HUTCHERSON: But the issue here, guys, really boils down to political correctness. Is ‑‑ her using the N‑word is terrible. Under the circumstances on how she used it to be understood. And I fight for her right to have freedom of speech in our Constitution. I don't like it, I've been called the N‑word so many times, I've been called the N‑word more than Van Camp's got pork and beans and so, you know, you get to the point where you've got to say, all right, that person is ignorant, that person is upset, that person is mad, but it all boils down really, guys, not that she used the N‑word but because she offended political correctness.

PAT: Yeah.

HUTCHERSON: And I don't understand why they would want to fire her. And I watch the Food Network, guys. You know, I get ‑‑

PAT: Me too.

HUTCHERSON: ‑‑ (inaudible) about watching that thing.

PAT: And Ken ‑‑ and Hutch, this is amazing.

HUTCHERSON: I like eating stuff that's with grease.

PAT: This is amazing coming from you because you, you grew up in a really tough environment and you got into football so that you could legally punish white people for the things they called you and the things they did to you.

HUTCHERSON: Absolutely.

PAT: And then ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: I found a legal way to hurt white people.

GLENN: Tell me ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: Football was the way to do it.

GLENN: Tell the story ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: And I got all my frustrations out that way.

GLENN: Tell the story a little bit, Hutch, for people who don't know you or your life story. Can you, can you kind of tell what your childhood was like?

HUTCHERSON: Probably the best way I can say it is when you are looked upon as less than human, when you are looked on as basically for years, you know, the whole concept in the South is three‑quarters of an individual, you wasn't even a whole individual, when you were looked at as being indolent, when you were looked at as not being able to think, you was a physical specimen, not a literal specimen.

PAT: When, in fact, you're an honor student for one thing.

HUTCHERSON: Yes.

PAT: Yeah.

HUTCHERSON: It kind of broke the mold when I was coming through school because I said if I beat up a white guy physically, they're going to say that, you know, I am part animal anyway and my muscle structure is built differently. But when I can compete with them mentally, that, that just disturbed a lot of white people in Alabama. And I was so frustrated about that. And I was a better baseball player than I was a football player, but you couldn't hit white people in baseball and get away with it, but you could in football.

GLENN: I think full ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: (Inaudible).

GLENN: I think full con‑ ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: ‑‑ in my locker when I was in high school, break up one white boy a day ‑‑

GLENN: That's what you had over your locker?

HUTCHERSON: ‑‑ in the South in the Sixties. And that's what I did. That's how I lived. And to hear what's happening with Paula Deen after going through what I went through is really small. But again, guys, don't lose what the issue is. The issue is not Paula Deen using the N‑word back in the circumstance she used it, back in the past and have to apologize for it. It is that she was brought out disturbing political correctness because Bill Maher, like you guys have been talking about, called Sarah Palin the C‑word.

GLENN: That's the other word I don't use.

PAT: Mmm‑hmmm.

HUTCHERSON: You know what? Is that offensive? Is that sexism as much as racism? But since he did it to a conservative white woman, it's okay.

PAT: Yeah.

HUTCHERSON: He laughed about that.

PAT: Yeah.

HUTCHERSON: Or what about David Letterman? What did he call Sarah Palin? A twit. Is that not sexism, but because it's not political incorrect ‑‑

PAT: Plus he went after her daughter.

HUTCHERSON: ‑‑ they did not get upset at them.

PAT: Yeah.

STU: It seems to be ‑‑

HUTCHERSON: And what I'm saying is, come on. Be real. They can get away with that because they think that Sarah Palin is a second class citizen who is conservative, who is not worth listening to, who is stupid and not really a whole individual. What if Bill Maher or Letterman would have called Hillary Clinton those words? Do you think they would have been fired then?

GLENN: Yes.

HUTCHERSON: And so stupidly ‑‑

GLENN: Let me ask you this, Hutch ‑‑

PAT: ‑‑ and inconsistency drives me nuts.

GLENN: And so I don't want to be the person. I stand up for Bill Maher's right to say those things, and I just speak out against it and say he's wrong.

HUTCHERSON: Yeah.

GLENN: There are people that ‑‑ see, I don't think people actually change. I think the chairs at the table change and the ‑‑ and those who are currently seated may have their seat removed from the table at some point.

HUTCHERSON: Yep.

GLENN: And so they just, the power changes, but people don't. And there are people now that are wanting revenge for what happened to their ancestors in the past and then the argument against it is, "Well, there's a double standard." Well, of course there's a double standard. There will always be a double standard.

HUTCHERSON: Yeah.

GLENN: There will always be injustice when man is involved. So what is the best way to fight this? Because I don't think ‑‑ I don't think fighting with boycotts or fighting to have David Letterman fired, I don't think that is the way. What is the way to fight this?

HUTCHERSON: I think the best way to fight it is to understand that we've got to learn to get along together and get unified in this country. And we better learn that the freedoms that the Constitution has given us is the greatest freedom, the greatest piece of paper ever written anywhere in all the world, in all mankind. And that Constitution gives us the right to disagree, yet move forward together. Even the issue, guys, when Imus was fired, does that bring up (inaudible) for you guys?

GLENN: Oh, yeah.

PAT: Yeah.

GLENN: We defended him as well.

PAT: Yeah.

HUTCHERSON: Yeah. When you call a basketball girl a nappy‑headed ho?

STU: Yeah.

HUTCHERSON: I mean, it's extremely insensitive.

GLENN: Yes, it is.

HUTCHERSON: Yeah, but he apologized, wanted to make it right and moved forward. But when you have blacks in this world who have a chip on their shoulder and think that America owes them something and that you ‑‑ "I'm a victim of everything that you do to every white person," we'll never get along in this country and we need to make up. What's going on ‑‑ why aren't people upset with what's going on in Chicago with black kids killing each other or in New York with black‑on‑black crime? It's almost 80% of what's going on. We better wake up, we better live our Constitution, and we better know that there's no second class citizen. And, we are going to overcome this and we are the greatest country in the world, and I love being black in America.

GLENN: That is something you just don't hear.

STU: Yeah.

GLENN: And when you hear ‑‑ Hutch is going to come down and do some shows with us, and when you hear his whole story and you know what this guy came from and to see how you conquer it, it is exactly the same way. What he ‑‑ how he has lived his life is the way we all need to live our life and the way our country needs to behave. Because if he can conquer his hatred, if he can conquer those who tried to keep him down and he had ‑‑ I mean, you were ‑‑ the Black Panthers were your boys in the Sixties.

HUTCHERSON: They was my boys. Eldridge Cleaver, Soul on Fire, Ice, baby, those are my boys before I met Jesus. When I met Jesus Christ, everything turned around. And there are too many people out there that don't know Jesus. That's why we've got such a bad world.

GLENN: Ken, I look forward to talking to you some more. I know that ‑‑ I missed your e‑mail. Am I going to like your e‑mail or not like your e‑mail?

HUTCHERSON: You're not going to only love my e‑mail, you're going to do back flips on my e‑mail.

GLENN: I'm in love with you. Ken, thank you very much.

HUTCHERSON: All right, guys, have a great day.

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