‘You may disagree with me…’ Glenn explains his personal journey as of late

Over the last few months, Glenn has heard from supporters and detractors about the position he has taken on a number of issues. On radio this morning, Glenn sought to further clarify where he is headed both personally and professionally as he laid out the values and principles that inform his life. While he understands not everyone will agree with his logic, he felt it was necessary to explain his journey.

Below is an edited transcript of the monologue:

I want to take you on a journey with me today. If you've been listening to me for a while, you're not going to be surprised by this journey at all. But I think we started something last week.

When I first learned about the Bundy ranch, we were looking into it. And it was a Saturday when it was all coming to a head. I got up in the morning, and I was watching it, and I heard in my head, ‘So it begins.’ And I don't know what it means to you. I don't even know what it means to me right now. But I've been avoiding some things for about five years that I don't want to do. And, honestly, it's not that I don't want to do them as much as I don't know how to do them.

I'm not a perfect guy by any stretch of the imagination. I'm not a preacher. I am barely even a man of God. I'm just not that guy. And I'm not a guy who leads things. I mean we started the 9/12 Project, and I said, 'It's yours.' It's just not me.

But something has begun. And what has begun is the things that I have seen coming for a long time. The anti-Semitism, the hatred, the split between us that is The Coming Insurrection, and I have not had a solution for you. I've had little solutions, but I have not had a solution for you. And I've been telling you, ‘We're passing all the exits,’ and that has made me more and more withdrawn, mainly because I know the answer and it's: I don't want to do it. I don't want to do it.

But nobody else is. And I've come to a place where it doesn't matter if anybody else does it. It's where I have to be. You may not join me on this journey, and you may disagree with me. That's fine. There's no condemnation. There might be anger on my part, but it's only because I'm a flawed human being. And I say ‘anger.’ I mean, occasionally I'll fly off the handle and can't understand why people might not see it. And that's okay. In the end, I might be wrong. I don't know. But I know it's where I'm supposed to stand.

We cannot build the future that I see and that I think you believe in. And when I say that, I don't mean I have some vision of some utopia. It's just the future where our kids play together, where people do judge our kids by the content of their character, not the color of their skin, not if they're conservative or liberal or Christian or atheist or Jewish anything else – just, what is their character? We have not accomplished that, and we cannot accomplish building that future if we are constantly looking behind at the past and blaming everything on people.

Look, there's lots of blame to go around. I had this conversation with somebody. They were like, ‘I'm not going to be blamed for this.’ Why are we talking about blame? Let's fix the problem. How are we going to do anything if we keep looking back and saying, ‘Hey, it's not me. You got to get that guy.’ Stop it.

There was never a rally sign. There was never a single rally that changed the world, that won a revolution. And, quite honestly, no revolution really is ever won. No revolution is ever won by guns. Revolutions that are won by guns are like the French Revolution or the Cultural Revolution in China. You don't want to be a part of any of those. The revolution in Russia, you don't want to be a part of that. That's not a revolution you want anyone to fight or win. A revolution that wins and the one that you want to be a part of, is the one that ends like the American Revolution – and that one didn't start with guns. That one started with ideas. The idea that we're all created equal. What does that mean? That you judge a man on the content of his character, that we're all coming to the table, we're all the same. They had flaws. They had slaves. We don't have slaves. We can do it this time.

And there are millions of Americans who believe that all men are created equal. I don't care what other people say. I don't care about the Klan. I don't care about the anti-Semites. I don't care about them. They will find themselves in the dustbin of history if we can stop giving them so much time in power. Let's empower the people that actually believe all men are created equal and endowed by their creator with certain rights. Life. You cannot take my life from me. Liberty. You can't throw me in jail without a just court. And the pursuit of happiness. I get to keep the fruits of my labors. I do the things that I have inside of me. And if you don't like it, you don't want to go along with it, it's okay.

Those were the ideas, but they're only won when they're forwarded by men and women of integrity. How many of us have integrity? It's really hard to have. They're only won when they're forwarded by people of compassion. How many of us have compassion? Compassion really counts when you don't want to do it. And courage. How many of us are even afraid to say anything now because of a label? Justice and mercy. Justice falls apart when there is no mercy. Justice falls apart when a society goes so cold they no longer pay any attention, when the people fall into iniquity. The people in power know they don't have to do justice anymore because nobody is keeping them in check. So they don't care about mercy. Mercy does not come from a government. Mercy comes from the human heart. It must come from us.

It's what made America great. We were good. We were merciful. We tried to do the right thing. And doing the right thing really only matters when it goes against what you want to do, what you like to do, goes against your best interests. That's when it really counts. Doing good when somebody is watching, doing good when it's in your best interest, that's nice and everything, but doing good when it's against what you want to do, that's when it matters. That's when there's a man of integrity behind it.

As JFK said, we don't do the things because they're easy; we do them because they are hard. We have to look forward, not back. We have to do the things that are not for us, but for others. And when I say that – not for your particular group. If it's for your group, then you're getting a benefit out of it. You have to be doing the things and I have to be doing the things and I trust God will take care of my group.

My group is taken care of because I'm concentrating on others. And if we can get the Jews to worry about the Christians and the Christians to worry about the Jews and the atheists to worry about the Christians and Christians and the Jews to worry about the atheists, and we're protecting those inalienable rights for all men, and we look at our rights last and look at our responsibilities first – we win. We win. And the world changes. Period.

Sen. Ted Cruz: NOBODY should be afraid of Trump's Supreme Court justice pick

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Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) joined Glenn Beck on the radio program Wednesday to weigh in on President Donald Trump's potential Supreme Court nominees and talk about his timely new book, "One Vote Away: How a Single Supreme Court Seat Can Change History."

Sen. Cruz argued that, while Congressional Democrats are outraged over President Trump's chance at a third court appointment, no one on either side should be afraid of a Supreme Court justice being appointed if it's done according to the founding documents. That's why it's crucial that the GOP fills the vacant seat with a true constitutionalist.

Watch the video below to hear the conversation:

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Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) joined Glenn Beck on the radio program Wednesday to talk about why he believes President Donald Trump will nominate Judge Amy Coney Barrett to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death.

Lee, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee that will consider and vote on the nominee, also weighed in on another Supreme Court contender: Judge Barbara Lagoa. Lee said he would not be comfortable confirming Lagoa without learning more about her history as it pertains to upholding the U.S. Constitution.

Watch the video below to hear the conversation:

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This week on the Glenn Beck Podcast, Glenn spoke with Vox co-founder Matthew Yglesias about his new book, "One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger."

Matthew and Glenn agree that, while conservatives and liberals may disagree on a lot, we're not as far apart as some make it seem. If we truly want America to continue doing great things, we must spend less time fighting amongst ourselves.

Watch a clip from the full interview with Matthew Yglesias below:


Find the full podcast on Glenn's YouTube channel or on Blaze Media's podcast network.

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'A convenient boogeyman for misinformation artists': Why is the New York Times defending George Soros?

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On the "Glenn Beck Radio Program" Tuesday, Glenn discussed the details of a recent New York Times article that claims left-wing billionaire financier George Soros "has become a convenient boogeyman for misinformation artists who have falsely claimed that he funds spontaneous Black Lives Matter protests as well as antifa, the decentralized and largely online, far-left activist network that opposes President Trump."

The Times article followed last week's bizarre Fox News segment in which former House Speaker Newt Gingrich appeared to be censored for criticizing Soros (read more here). The article also labeled Glenn a "conspiracy theorist" for his tweet supporting Gingrich.

Watch the video clip below for details:


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